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Basement vs. Living room for wood insert?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by emt1581, Jul 7, 2010.

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  1. emt1581

    emt1581 Minister of Fire

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    See my above post on back-up heat sources. ;)

    -Emt1581

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  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    That's a regional thing. It depends on the species of wood, time of year, seasoning, whim of the seller, etc. Ask around locally and pay a little more for wood from a seller that has a good, year after year, reputation. It's worth it.

    Whatever you find, get at least a couple of cords of 16" seasoned wood bought and stacked now. Modern stoves do not like semi-seasoned wood and don't produce a lot of heat if you try to burn it. This is the most common complaint we hear come November.
  3. emt1581

    emt1581 Minister of Fire

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    Oh good to know!!

    I figure I'll check Craigslist initially, but other than that I really don't know how to find someone that has a "good rep". I mean everyone I know has a gas fireplace...for the look. No one serious about wood heating. So how do I find someone in my area?

    Thanks!

    -Emt1581
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    This doc explains it on page 3 & 4.
    http://tinyurl.com/2cpmeop
  5. btuser

    btuser Minister of Fire

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    If you're all electric then you're at the low end of "do I have to worry about this" spectrum. A gas/oil burning appliance will need combustion air to burn, so does a wood stove. An atomspheric gas boiler is no match compared to a well-drafting wood stove, and even it was oil burner/power-vented it will suck the flue gas right out the barometric damper But you're electric so I wouldn't worry.

    I would have to pay $300/cord for dry wood, $250 for "seasoned" wood, and $200 for a decent cord. You can get deals if you buy more at a time and save the driver trips. I just got 4 REALLY GOOD cords @ $170/cord. Wood is better than oil right now and 2x as good as electric (my rate is about $.19/KW) but still not as good as gas. I live in Southern NH.

    Have you run the numbers on what a gas conversion would cost/save for your heating and hot water? Why not take the offer of $300 for a gas hookup and go with a 90+ furnace that could direct vent, then you've just regained another flue for a possible wood stove in another area? Ahhh, I love spending other people's money.
  6. emt1581

    emt1581 Minister of Fire

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    You mean that part about the down/thermal drafts? Seems like that's only if I have a few fireplaces. Hopefully we'll figure out a way to get a stove upstairs and then use the downstairs for either an insert of some sort or just a regular fireplace (if entertaining or whatever).

    Thanks!

    -Emt1581
  7. emt1581

    emt1581 Minister of Fire

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    Woah! I thought a good cord would be like $150-ish! Seems like the cost of wood has gone up from the 90's. I have not done the numbers on gas but I want a fire of some sort...for light, heat and ambiance. Unless a gas furnace would be ridiculously cheaper I wouldn't be interested. Plus I like being independent. I can always get more wood or find stuff to burn if need be. I don't want to have to worry about a supply line or price going through the roof and such.

    Thanks though!

    -Emt1581
  8. btuser

    btuser Minister of Fire

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    Not so much downdraft because the flue is cold, but the suction caused by the draft of a hot flue.
  9. emt1581

    emt1581 Minister of Fire

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  10. emt1581

    emt1581 Minister of Fire

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    Something we haven't focused a whole lot on is the idea of a wood stove in the living room and it's capabilities. If I were to put a stove in the living room...would it heat the upstairs bedrooms fairly well?

    Thanks!

    -Emt1581
  11. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Mine does. Heats both floors. As I have said here before, I sleep under a sheet year round. And yes I am in balmy Northern Virginia. We only got down to five degrees last January, with three feet of snow. Kind of a temperate climate.

    Of course the other three feet that fell on top of it before it melted pissed me off.
  12. Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle

    Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle Minister of Fire

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    Probably, depends on the layout.

    I'm rounding up the "sistahs", this is getting out of control. You guys have forgotten us , yet again.

    I bet it'd be a done deal, for the sistahs, put a stove on the first floor, and git 'er dun.
  13. emt1581

    emt1581 Minister of Fire

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    Wait...what?? What's getting out of control? Who have I forgotten? Do I need to put my body armor on and hide under the bed or something???

    -Emt1581
  14. Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle

    Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle Minister of Fire

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    Yes. All of the above :coolsmirk:
  15. Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle

    Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle Minister of Fire

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    I advised on "get your wood now" on page 1, I believe.
  16. emt1581

    emt1581 Minister of Fire

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    I think someone's been nippin the hooch..... ;)

    -Emt1581
  17. emt1581

    emt1581 Minister of Fire

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    Who the hell remembers back that far?!?!

    It does seem like a lot do it though. We close on the 22nd. I plan to figure out what we're going with and get two cords ASAP then cover them up with a tarp and wait for winter like a kid on Christmas Eve!!!

    -Emt1581
  18. Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle

    Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle Minister of Fire

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    Nope, not tonight.
  19. Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle

    Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle Minister of Fire

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    Cover top only, after it's stacked.

    If the weather is good, hold of on the covering. Wood needs air flow to dry.
  20. emt1581

    emt1581 Minister of Fire

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    Other than putting a canopy over the wood pile...how do you cover just the top? Also, if there's any sort of wind when it rains, isn't the rest of the pile going to get soaked??...or do yall run out and quick cover it in a rain storm?

    Thanks!

    -Emt1581
  21. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Don't worry about it. Just cover the top of the pile. Any side wetness will dry out quickly.
  22. gyrfalcon

    gyrfalcon Minister of Fire

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    Forget about the rain. It won't get "soaked," just damp about an eighth of an inch in at best, and it dries out in a day or two, hours in the stove room, minutes inside the stove. If you really, really, really can't stand to leave it totally uncovered, you can cut down some tarp and string it just over the top of the pile, or better yet get a few metal roofing panels and weight them down with rocks or something.

    We argue about this all the time on this forum, but one thing we agree on is never, never cover the whole shebang because it just holds in the moisture the wood is trying to get rid of. I don't cover my stacks at all, even in winter, and the worst that happens is it's a little damp on the outside when I bring it in and takes a couple hours near the stove to dry out completely, maybe a day if it's stacked on the other side of the room away from the stove.

    But you really have to get your wood and get it stacked outside loosely NOW. It's no kidding that the new stoves/inserts require totally dry wood to work properly (and not gunk up your chimney with creosote), and starting now with green wood, you're going to have your problems as it is.

    Come over to the Woodshed forum and talk about wood supply and folks can give you the lowdown. One word of warning. If you find somebody on craigislist advertising "seasoned wood," it won't be.
  23. ddddddden

    ddddddden Minister of Fire

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    Also, I think you mentioned a wood rack behind the trees. . .you want your wood out baking under the summer sun, not under the shade of trees, especially if you have only ~ 4 mo. to get it dried out. If your father's Osburn is much over ~ 20 yrs old, it's "pre-EPA." As has already been mentioned, but perhaps underestimated by you, newer "EPA stoves" are much more picky about their fuel being dry. "I can always find something to burn" is not as doable with the new stoves, unless you are talking about finding something dry like 2x4's or wood bricks. Around here, nobody sells dry firewood anymore, except for the $4 bundles @ Kroger. IME, the wood vendors on Craigslist are con artists who either don't know what "seasoned" means, or don't care and will just tell you whatever they think you want to hear. Best price around here is $300 for a dump truck load that's supposed to be ~ 2.5 cords. . .works out to ~ $1 /cu ft.
  24. gyrfalcon

    gyrfalcon Minister of Fire

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    Here's one "sistah's" perspective on the stove versus insert issue. Before I had a stove, all I knew was fireplaces, which I loved. I felt cheated when I couldn't find a home that I liked with a fireplace and had to settle for a woodstove. After I lit the first fire in it, you could not have paid me a million bucks to have an insert instead. Woodstoves are magical in a way that inserts just aren't, nor are fireplaces. An insert just feels to me like a thick glass barrier between me and the fireplace. A handsome woodstove is pure joy just on its own terms, radiates heat on five sides and doesn't require a noisy blower to warm up the room. I'm a total, complete, abject convert.

    But on the esthetics, there are woodstoves and there are woodstoves. Some are un-handsome and utilitarian "black boxes," but others are the handsomest piece of furniture in any room, even when they're not going.
  25. emt1581

    emt1581 Minister of Fire

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    I appreciate your reply. No offense though but you ARE posting on this forum...that sort of makes you more biased than the "typical" gal in terms of fireplaces, stoves, etc... I think what I'll do is explain that if we get the stove and don't have to spend thousands on a fireplace, she can get the granite counter tops...

    BTW, by handsomest do you mean the colorful ones with the glazing on them?

    Thanks!

    -Emt1581
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