BIg Green Egg Grill

Bone1099 Posted By Bone1099, Jul 8, 2010 at 8:03 PM

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. HeatsTwice

    HeatsTwice
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 7, 2008
    577
    76
    Loc:
    Santa Rosa, California
    Cowboy charcoal is sold at Home Depo - $8 a bag.

    Where is Wicked Good sold?
     
  2. stoveguy2esw

    stoveguy2esw
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 14, 2006
    6,169
    1,088
    Loc:
    madison hgts. va
    our local lowes carries cowboy for six bucks and change. as for the other ive never seen it
     
  3. richg

    richg
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 20, 2005
    888
    63
    Wicked Good can be a little tough to find and it is pricey, but worth it. Here is a link to their "where to buy" page.

    http://www.wickedgoodcharcoal.com/retail_locations.htm
     
  4. Lanningjw

    Lanningjw
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 15, 2008
    510
    20
    Loc:
    Plymouth, Minnesota
    We use the Weber smoker 22.5 for cooking ribs. I can put 6 slabs (laying flat) on the smoker at one time. Smoked 20 pounds of ribs in 4.5 hours and drank some cold beer. I can smoke a 15 lb turkey with the room this smoker has. I payed $350 for this thing, you may want to consider this one also.

    http://www.weber.com/explore/Grill_details.aspx?glid=8&mid=121
     
  5. JoeyD

    JoeyD
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jun 15, 2008
    527
    149
    Loc:
    South Jersey


    For the money these are not bad. The difference between this and a BGE is you can also grill, bake, roast and do high temperature cooks of 650 °F + . You will never be happy eating a steak at a restaurant again. Also try to maintain a low and slow for 20 hours in the middle of the winter or anytime of year with a WSM without adding fuel. This gives you more time to drink beer :coolsmile:. Really this is like comparing apples and oranges, the egg does what this can do and whole lot more.
     
  6. Lanningjw

    Lanningjw
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 15, 2008
    510
    20
    Loc:
    Plymouth, Minnesota
    Let your back and wallet be your guide......
     
  7. JoeyD

    JoeyD
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jun 15, 2008
    527
    149
    Loc:
    South Jersey
    I hear ya! If money is a issue the WSM gets a lot of good reviews and makes a pretty darn good smoker.
    I have a question though never having used one. How easy is to control the temperature with those? Is it easy to keeps temps down below 120 °F to do jerky? Or under 100 °F to smoke cheese? I ask because with the egg it can be done but takes some unconventional set ups. Nothing difficult but not as simple as loading up and lighting it. Jerky and cheese are two things I want to do but haven't done yet.
     
  8. Lanningjw

    Lanningjw
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 15, 2008
    510
    20
    Loc:
    Plymouth, Minnesota
    The WSM uses a large water bowl as the heat sink to control temps. I have not done Jerky or smoked cheese, but I have read that the smoker is better at low temp smoke that the egg. I bought the WSM last summer and had all the peolpe that live around us over for ribs or chicken. Every time I use it I learn more and more about making ribs. If its a windy day it effects the temp of the smoker. Seems to suck the heat out of the thing.

    How are you making your spare ribs with the egg?
     
  9. smokinj

    smokinj
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Aug 11, 2008
    15,981
    1,412
    Loc:
    Anderson, Indiana
    If done in the winter those temps are easy to do!
     
  10. JoeyD

    JoeyD
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jun 15, 2008
    527
    149
    Loc:
    South Jersey
    I do an indirect setup and a drip pan with a dome temperature of 250 °F with a dry rub and sauce for the last hour or so. Usually they take about 5 hours until the meat begins to pull back of the bone. This makes the meat come clean off the bone when you eat them but not mushy like when some people foil them.

    Here is another method I've used that a lot of people enjoy: http://playingwithfireandsmoke.blogspot.com/2002/06/baby-back-rib-class.html
     
  11. JoeyD

    JoeyD
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jun 15, 2008
    527
    149
    Loc:
    South Jersey
    Yes, one of the nice things about the thing is the ability to maintain temperature for hours year round with little or no adjustment. The ceramics are a great insulator. I do use a remote thermometer and one of these for long cooks in the Winter:
    http://www.thebbqguru.com/categories/Power-Draft-Controls/
    Ya, its cheating but it make things a whole lot easier. I cooked 32 lbs of pulled pork last year in a snow storm for close to 20 hours on one load of charcoal and had plenty left over.
     
  12. smokinj

    smokinj
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Aug 11, 2008
    15,981
    1,412
    Loc:
    Anderson, Indiana
    I have the sameones
     
  13. richg

    richg
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 20, 2005
    888
    63
    The Weber Smokey Mountain is a fine cooking implement. You can do just about anything on it. AGainst the Egg, though, the Weber will come up short. The Egg is made of thick ceramic and the airflow is totally controlled by the top and bottom vents. In the dead of winter, the Egg is unaffected by wind or cold. The weber is made of uninsulated metal; whle you can smoke on it in the winter, it takes a lot more work to maintain a constant temp. Some recommend replacing the water with sand.

    I did a 20-hour pork butt last February that was as good as anything from the warmer months.
     
  14. pyper

    pyper
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 5, 2010
    491
    1
    Loc:
    Deep South
    My old water smoker was shot and I was kind of temped by an egg until I saw the prices. I got a Brinkman water smoker at Home Depot. Maybe it uses a little more charcoal, but you can buy a lot of charcoal for the difference between $60 and $900. ;-)

    I haven't found anything I couldn't cook in a water smoker. I usually fill the water bowl about half way, and then as the fire dies down and the water evaporates things even out. I did a 4 pound roast last weekend on a single (half) load of charcoal.
     
  15. KennyG

    KennyG
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Mar 24, 2010
    30
    0
    Loc:
    Kansas City
    People love their Big Green Eggs like people love thier Fiskars/Stihls/Dolmars. I don't have one, but have friends that do. They love the BGE.
     
  16. spirilis

    spirilis
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 8, 2009
    758
    42
    Loc:
    New Market, MD
    Lol for anyone good with DIY projects, check this out-

    http://z12projects.blogspot.com/2010/07/little-blue-egg.html

    Half tempted to try it myself. Not sure how well terracotta flower pots insulate compared to the BGE's ceramics (which are some special type, according to the sales guy I spoke with at a local dealer) but a hell of a lot cheaper!
     
  17. smokinj

    smokinj
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Aug 11, 2008
    15,981
    1,412
    Loc:
    Anderson, Indiana
    I have seen them made out of big clay pots as well.
     
  18. HittinSteel

    HittinSteel
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Aug 11, 2008
    1,587
    409
    Loc:
    Northeastern Ohio

    Good Eats with Alton Brown?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Ka2kpzTAL8
     
  19. smokinj

    smokinj
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Aug 11, 2008
    15,981
    1,412
    Loc:
    Anderson, Indiana
    Thats it..........
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page