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  1. kevinmoelk

    kevinmoelk New Member

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    Howdy. Yes, my question relates to burning manure. It seems many cultures burn cow patties and other sources of animal manure for fire fuel. I don't have any cows, but do have 4 large dogs. I'm wondering if anyone else has tried burning dog poop or any other poop for that matter. I'm laughing while typing this, but it is a serious question.

    I know that I throw away about a paper trash bag full of poo every week. Seems like a waste to send that to the landfill if it could be used to burn.

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  2. coldinnj

    coldinnj New Member

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    what a sh*tty fuel.

    Ok, enough of those fecal jokes.
    Cow manure and dog manure have different properties. Heard of using dried cow manure. Never heard of the same for dog manure though.
  3. coldinnj

    coldinnj New Member

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    BTW your avatar looks like someone is looking for even more fuel. LOL :)
  4. johnsopi

    johnsopi Minister of Fire

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    That's funny!
  5. Homefire

    Homefire New Member

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    You could try a bucket full of dog poo and report back. Do you have an open
    firepit or a window you could vent it out . Let us know how it works out for you.
    There are turkey barns about 10 miles from here where you can get turkey poo for
    $15 a yard. Most of the time it is already putting out 3 - 4 hundred degrees, that
    would be a little head start for you in your quest to muck up your stove.
  6. nrmahoney@cox.net

    nrmahoney@cox.net Member

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    In Tibet a common source of blindness in children comes from the burning of Yak Dung in open fires for warmth.
  7. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    lol Well i guess we should of known this thread/question was coming.
  8. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    Buddy , leave the chit in the brown paper bag and i will send you a 16" Oak split to make up the difference. :-/
  9. stangds

    stangds New Member

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    Dog crap has some nasty pathogens in it. I've considered doing this myself, i wouldn't try to burn them unless the fire was raging, and I could toss in a bag and slam the door behind it. not sure if you want the nasties floating around in your house....
  10. DeanBrown3D

    DeanBrown3D New Member

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    Approximately how long does a decent size dog poo take to season properly?
  11. kevinmoelk

    kevinmoelk New Member

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    I knew this thread would draw some funny remarks. Okay, so dog poo a resounding NO. Still, what about cow manure?

    Never heard of anyone going blind by fire, that's a new one.

    -Kevin
  12. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    I wonder what it would smell like, remember it has to be seasoned . I think he has discovered a way to keep solisitors from knocking at his door.
    I'm trying real hard not to laugh too loud thinking about coments I could make. but this is a chitty situation and I think the effort is full off crap
    Is your stove listed to burn this chit. And my wife thought cleaning ashes was messy. Hey honey don't go in the garage for the next 9 months the buckets of dog chit have not dried yet
    And I thought cresote smell was bad in the summer
  13. kevinmoelk

    kevinmoelk New Member

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    Don't hold back on my account Elk... I can take it. Let's hear 'em!

    Still looking for blindness related to the burning of Yak manure in Tibet on google. No evidence yet. I forget who posted, but let's see a link.

    -Kevin
  14. tw40x81

    tw40x81 Member

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    From http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=1314944

    In Tibet, an area with one of the highest prevalences of cataract, a lack of vitamin A is compounded by exposure to high-altitude ultraviolet (UV) light, soot and pathogens from indoor burning of coal and yak dung, and a dusty, windy environment. As a result, 10.9% of the total Tibetan population suffers visual impairment.
  15. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    Any residual "mositure" is going to give your cat, if you have one, thermal shock.

    Burning any of that stuff really stinks, especially the kind that gets squeezed out by carnivores. You might do it once, but I doubt you'll make the same mistake twice.

    I've found over the years that while you can burn all kinds of interesting things in a wood stove, burning anything other than dry firewood is a mistake.

    I know that Dylan burns cardboard, but it seems to me that would be more trouble than it's worth.

    Bury that dog squeeze along with all your kitchen scraps and wood ashes in the ground, and you'll be improving the soil. Just not in a garden because of the pathogens from the dogs.
  16. quads

    quads Minister of Fire

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    We got lots of it, but have never tried burning it. Don't think I will either. Cow manure=fertilizer, firewood=firewood! Seems like Laura Ingalls burned buffalo poop on the prairie, didn't she? Didn't her sister go blind? Hmmm, maybe a connection?
  17. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    God that smell is killing me I thought you said it was seasoned. Got a better idea much cleaner too, burn the dog food

    Dont mind him he burns all kinds of chit. When you start the fire would you use chit on a stick

    Craig this thread is going down the crapper quickly but at least it could be funny.

    Damn honey you just ruined our heat supply watch where you are stepping
  18. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Darn. Something else that is fun that makes you go blind.
  19. Andre B.

    Andre B. New Member

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    An almost infinitely better way of heating with "crap" is to put it in a digester and burn the resulting methane for heat, or better yet burn it in a engine spinning a generator to offset some grid electricity and use the waste heat from the engine. That has to do with the concept of the quality of a given amount of energy, a very large mass of water that is at a temperature 1°F hotter then your house may have the same number of BTUs that a small mass of water at 120°F hotter then your house. But the smaller mass of water will provide a lot more useful heat.

    Then you still have the liquids and remaining solids from the digester for use as fertilizer on the garden.
    ________________
    Andre' B.
  20. kevinmoelk

    kevinmoelk New Member

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    Noooo. Would never do that. I live on a well and fecal contamination is a concern. I would never leave the dog poo out too long and certainly not bury it. Leaving it on the grass just kills the grass. Kitchen scraps and wood ashes... okay, I'll put them in the ground.

    Methane production has great potential and another good saleable product for dairy farmers. I'd love to see more of it.

    Blindness? Okay, but there seems to be many other pieces of the puzzle beyond just burning manure.

    I'm not defending or promoting manure burning, lol... just trying learn and keep the forum lively.

    -Kevin
  21. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    Can you run carnivore chit through a digester, Andre? Would the residual material be safe to use in the garden, or would you want to age it to kill off the bugs?
  22. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Imagine sitting around a wood stove convention so what are your tools of the trade a chain saw maul PE wedges
    what do you use a super pooper scooper and how do you stack it does it need to be split or covered. are flies a problem
    In Franklin Ma maybe your neighbor would not be stealing you chit..

    Honey pull over pull over did you see that road apple.Nothing like a trip to the park and transporting a fresh bucked of dog chit
    Damn honey I hope you don't mind but the bucket tipped over in the car but don't worry I scraped most of it back up.
    The best part no one will be bumming ride from you anymore Might reduce the trade in value This gives a new meaning to owning an old chiter to drive around
  23. kevinmoelk

    kevinmoelk New Member

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  24. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Hilarious Elk.
  25. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    If you have any neighbors that are Viet Nam vets I would advise against burning poop. Liable to set off major flashbacks. The method of poop disposal for the American troops there was tossing diesel in with it and burning it. And ya smelled it 24/7/365.
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