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Cleaned my chimney and removed my insert - Jotul F 600 coming!

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Nick Mystic, Feb 25, 2013.

  1. Nick Mystic

    Nick Mystic Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2013
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    610
    Loc:
    Western North Carolina
    On Sunday I cleaned my chimney and removed my insert in advance of installing my new Jotul F600
    wood stove. As some of you know from my previous post when my wife and I bought our home eleven years ago it had an insert installed slammer style in the living room fireplace. Over the years I cleaned the chimney twice, but over time I started getting some stage 3 creosote in the huge 18"x13" clay flue. So, I decided to replace the insert with a new free standing stove and do a proper installation with a ss liner.

    Here is a photo of the brush I cobbled together for my chimney cleaning:

    IMG_0180.JPG

    And here it is with the 20' of handle that I pieced together from the broom handles I bought at WalMart to make this brush (4 brooms @ $1.48 each!).

    IMG_0178.JPG

    It worked great! I must have shoved it down and up the chimney at least 100 times if you count each three foot push and pull.

    That turned out being the easy part. Next, I pulled out the insert and proceeded to clean up all 20 gallons of creosote that had fallen down the chimney! After seeing all that creosote I told my wife that we really dodged a bullet by not having had a chimney fire! A good reason never to go with the slammer installation!

    Today I spent another two hours inside the fireplace scraping and vacuuming up the rest of the creosote in the smoke chamber. Once that was finished I proceeded to use my sawzall to cut an 8" hole in my cast iron flue door and assembly. That went pretty well, but I'm pretty sore tonight from all the contortions I had to do crammed in the fireplace!

    Finally, I fabricated a stop plate for the bottom of the chimney. This took a couple of hours since it was tricky shaping the trapezoidal size, but it came out pretty well I think. Here is a photo of the empty fireplace and the new stop plate:

    IMG_0184.JPG

    IMG_0183.JPG

    I have a 13" x 13" top plate with 6" hole that I'll be placing over this 8" square hole once I have my T connector down the chimney. I plan to put insulation on top of this stop plate and then use high temperature silicone caulk to seal the smaller cap plate when I screw it in place.

    Tomorrow I plan to spend some time seeing how clean I can get all those dirty bricks inside the fireplace. If I can't get them clean I'll probably paint the walls black. I'm hoping they clean up though.
    PapaDave, lumbering on and pen like this.

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  2. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    I think you will be completely amazed at the difference.

    Look forward to hearing how it goes as you learn the new stove.

    This is one giant step for a wood burner.

    Well done.

    pen
    PapaDave likes this.
  3. lumbering on

    lumbering on Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
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    Loc:
    New York
    I am looking to install a block-off plate myself.

    Can I ask what gauge of metal you used, and how you attached it to the brick (sealed, etc?).

    Looking forward to watching the project unfold.
  4. Oldhippie

    Oldhippie Minister of Fire

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    Wow! Great work!
  5. Nick Mystic

    Nick Mystic Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2013
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    610
    Loc:
    Western North Carolina
    I'm not sure of the gauge on the stop-off plate. I bought it about 25 years ago when I installed an Atalanta Stove Works Woodsman stove in my previous home. I used it under a layer of brick to make a hearth for the stove. More recently it has been sitting under my shop's wood stove. I pulled it out today to make the block-off. It's thick enough that I had to bend it three inches at a time with some large bending pliers. For the time being it is just held in place by friction, but when I do the final installation I'll drill some holes in the side flanges and put some screws in some mortar joints.
  6. Defiant

    Defiant Vermont Castings Geek

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    Old Lyme CT
    Nice job!!!!!:cool:
  7. Pallet Pete

    Pallet Pete Guest

    Good job and love the broom. That looks like it will be a great spot to relax near too. Keep the pics coming !

    Pete
  8. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    You can go light gauge here. It's easier to work with. 26ga is fine.
  9. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Northern Virginia
    Yeah light gauge sheet will do fine. And tight enough friction fit will work. Well, it has for six years.

    20 gallons of sote! !!! Why I used to pull that 650 pound slammer out every year to get that stuff out when sweeping.
  10. coldkiwi

    coldkiwi Member

    Joined:
    May 2, 2012
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    Loc:
    Socal
    Nice job,you are lucky to have a high lintel height makes installing a freestander a lot easier.You could try muriatic acid to clean the bricks, mixed with water.I would think twice about painting the alcove black, heat reflecting white may be a better bet

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