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Going broke heating with wood. :)

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by mking7, Jan 28, 2013.

  1. Oldhippie

    Oldhippie Minister of Fire

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    LOL!!!

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  2. ohlongarm

    ohlongarm Minister of Fire

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    Northeastern Ohio
    Beautiful racks best I've seen,and a wonderful helper.
  3. Reckless

    Reckless Feeling the Heat

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    Jan 24, 2013
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    Loc:
    Orange county, NY
    Ill take some of that wood off your hands XP Were in the midst of an icestorm here and the "Cord" I bought only half of it is seasoned and the other half is waterlogged and frozen..... nice racks btw
  4. Dakotas Dad

    Dakotas Dad Minister of Fire

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    Central Kentucky
    My brother in the Waco area burns more wood than me.

    Nice racks for sure.

    I also thought PVC at first.. lol
  5. Sprinter

    Sprinter Minister of Fire

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    SW Washington
    Very nice. I'm no welder, but I can slop glue on PVC just fine. I'm thinking I'd like to do something similar with PVC. Do you think PVC would work, and what size do you think would be best?
  6. Reckless

    Reckless Feeling the Heat

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    Orange county, NY
    Does PVC crack and break down over time with extreme tempature changes? No need to weld, I'm using 2" steel pipe I had lying around, works just fine for me. Once you get weight on them they aint moving ;) it would be nice to have those ends but I just stack them pretty.
  7. corey21

    corey21 Minister of Fire

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    Nice wood racks.
  8. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    South Puget Sound, WA
    Insulation is important down there too, especially during the air conditioning season which can be 5 months of the year or more.
  9. mking7

    mking7 Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2011
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    Loc:
    West, TX
    Usually more for us. But I got to thinking....I wonder if some of what we do to make our homes efficient for summer make them less so in winter. Insulation is great either way but for example I have radiant barrier roof decking that is supposed block 90+% of the sun's radiant heat from the sun. Keeps the attic cooler in the summer and reduces your cooling bill. In the winter, I might like that radiant heat to keep the house warmer, no? Do you guys install radiant barriers up north?
  10. mking7

    mking7 Burning Hunk

    Joined:
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    Loc:
    West, TX
    I would think PVC would have a relatively short life in our weather conditions here. You'd also probably need to put a runner across the top of the rack to keep them solid.

    But good point on not needing a welder. You could do what I did with threaded pipe ends and some elbows.
  11. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Ideally what happens up at the roof and in the attic will be isolated from the house interior. You would be better off to maximize solar gain in the interior of the house from the low sun angle in the winter. Even if it is not through windows in the house a solar space heater can help in your climate. See how precaud did this in the green room.

    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/adding-another-solar-air-heater.52195/
    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/...ces-for-space-heating-and-other-stuff.103879/
    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/passive-solar.104532/
  12. Motor7

    Motor7 Feeling the Heat

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    East TN.
    I wish I had some Sch 40 pipe "laying around"...excellent job! Don't get to far ahead on wood, uncovered stuff I have from 3 years ago is almost past it's prime...gotta burn it up this season for sure.
  13. mking7

    mking7 Burning Hunk

    Joined:
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    Loc:
    West, TX
    Well, I wish I hadn't had it laying around. Since I only had enough for 1 rack laying around. The 2nd two proved to be kinda pricey. :)

    Too far ahead on wood? Are you in the wrong forum? :)
  14. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    What type of wood is it, have not had any problem with three year old wood getting bad.
    Joful likes this.
  15. Motor7

    Motor7 Feeling the Heat

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    East TN.
    No and I'm way behind. The house build took all my "energy" so I did't cut any wood until Oct-ish. And yes, saws, chaps, grinder, pto log splitter, tractor for the logsplitter, etc ....gets expensive....BUT LOOK AT THEN MONEY WE ARE SAVING ON THE LIGHT BILL[​IMG]
    ...and no I wouldn't have it any other way
  16. Motor7

    Motor7 Feeling the Heat

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    Loc:
    East TN.
    Oak, up on pallets uncovered. The lower layer has termites in it.....NG(not good).
  17. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    I've had a plan (no time to act on it), to buy some ground treatment for termites, and install it in the aisles between my woodpiles. I've also seen evidence of termites in my stacks, mostly in the wood that sat on dirt for a few years in the round.
  18. Slow1

    Slow1 Minister of Fire

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    Eastern MA
    Get that wood up off the ground using something that the termites can't or won't eat and you will have your problem solved. As I understand it they have to have a path to ground to survive.

    Consider using plastic pallets and be sure they are elevated high enough (perhaps go 2 high if necessary) so the termites can't mound their way up.

    I'm glad I haven't had to deal with those buggers! We do get carpenter ants here but I believe we've beat those back into the woods finally... at least for a few months.
  19. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    They have no trouble building a path, when none exist. Mud tunnels.
  20. Slow1

    Slow1 Minister of Fire

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    I just googled that - amazing and scary. I reiterate - sure glad I haven't had to deal with them!
  21. Motor7

    Motor7 Feeling the Heat

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    East TN.
    Yep, the first log house I built in TX was up on old creosote power poles. The little buggers would mud tunnel up over 4' on the poles to get to the sweet sweet southern yellow pine logs>>
  22. katwillny

    katwillny Guest

    you teaching that girl the tricks of the trade is worth every penny my friend. there is no price to the amount of memories you are creating for that little girl right there. in 30 years she will look back and say, i remember the days when I did this and that with "MKING7" lol.

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