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Hearthstone Heritage

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by RORY12553, Jan 22, 2013.

  1. RORY12553

    RORY12553 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2011
    Messages:
    510
    Loc:
    Southern NY
    Is there any reason why the top burn tubes on the Hearthstone Heritage slop from front to back? Makes it difficult to load.

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  2. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    It's not an uncommon design. I believe all, or most, burn tube stoves have an upwards slope of some degree from back to front.
  3. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    You want the slope so that smoke will follow the roof towards the chimney. Without the slope, the smoke would pour out the side door.
  4. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    Really, its just that the firebox is too small. You would never notice that sloped roof if the stove was twice as large.
  5. RORY12553

    RORY12553 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2011
    Messages:
    510
    Loc:
    Southern NY
    I know you had the stove that i have now...the firebox is to small...not sure the stove is big enough for the 2400 sq ft i have to heat with it...max burn i get out of it is 7-8 hrs and that is if i'm lucky ...I know i have asked you in the past but what was your overall view of the stove?
  6. RORY12553

    RORY12553 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2011
    Messages:
    510
    Loc:
    Southern NY
    being you had the stove maybe you can help me ....i load the stove raking coals forward....loading bigger splits in the back and then smaller ones in the front ...issue i sometimes have is to much coals that block the air from coming in the front...any suggestions? to many coals?
  7. ridemgis

    ridemgis Burning Hunk

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    Loc:
    South Kingstown, Rhode Island
    U
    Use a poker to dig a little trench from the dog house through the mounded coals before putting in the front row of splits.
    Then load the hell out of it with wood against the glass and touching the burn tubes. Play the air right and you can get 7 or 8 hours of heat. That may not be enough for 2400 sqft though.
  8. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    I owned the stove as well. I liked it a little more than Highbeam. I thought it was a good stove for a well insulated 1500 sq ft home in a colder climate or under 2,000 sq ft in a milder climate.

    Expecting whole house heating for 2,400 sq ft in New York is not what this stove is made fore. Depending upon your insulation, the Mansfield or Equinox would be required.
  9. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
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    I liked the stove just fine but I was able to conclude that it was never designed for a long life of daily burning. It was a very attractive stove with a great fireview and performed per the specs. Really shoddy door latch systems.

    ridemgis is right about moving the coals to the front but also digout a small channel to allow that airjet to blow. Really though, blocking that little doghouse hole might be a benefit since it reduces the air supply and might extend the burn. The primary air mainly comes in from above the glass and PLENTY of air comes in to this stove if your chimney is reasonable.
  10. RORY12553

    RORY12553 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2011
    Messages:
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    Loc:
    Southern NY
    The stove is old and the more that I look at it the more things I start to see that are going wrong with it. I have replaced both front and side door handle, the front glass, front glass gasket, the front door itself, the side door gasket, the ash door gasket. I noticed that the front door frame is starting to seperate from the stove slightly and I can't tighten back up. I know the prior owners put the stove in around 2002 so it is 11 years old now. what is the average life span of this stove?
  11. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
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    Mine was still servicable after 5 years and over 25 cords of wood. The slop in the non-repairable hinges was the final straw. The door gaskets outlasted the casting! We do miss the awesome fireview.
  12. Kitchen

    Kitchen New Member

    Joined:
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    41
    Loc:
    Shawangunk Mountains, NYS
    I hear ya brother. I've owned my Heritage for about 6 years and I hate it. It looks great, especially when you rear vent it, but the quality is terrible. I've replaced the front door frame once the cast broke. Luckily Hearthstone replaced this door frame with a latch channel that was not cast, but a steel plate in it's place. Both door latches, however, have been worn down until they are paper thin and eventually break. There is not a positive fit when I close either door. I am scared to death to put any kind of load in this stove because there is just no way to control the burn with the leaks and I'll be damned if I am going to put anymore money into it.

    I have decided to get a Jotul F 55. A little bigger than I need, but I tend to keep my 2400 sq ft house on the cool side. It might be nice to see what 72 degrees feels like. I also like the combo construction - steel firebox with firebricks, but cast iron sides. The best of both worlds in my mind. Also, it eliminates the ash box, the top load that the F 50 had and it is 100 pounds lighter than the F 50.
  13. RORY12553

    RORY12553 Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
    Southern NY
    What is the price for that stove? I can't afford to buy a new stove right now. The one I have works ok but I don't like it overall. think i am going to start writing things down that I don't like so I know what i would want in the next stove.

    I also just realized I am not far from you. I live on the north side of chadwick lake.
  14. Kitchen

    Kitchen New Member

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    Loc:
    Shawangunk Mountains, NYS
    Not sure on the price, but Jotul advertises it as an affordable, simple stove with many improvements. I would hope it would be under $2k.

    I live by the Mohonk Mountain House.
  15. RORY12553

    RORY12553 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2011
    Messages:
    510
    Loc:
    Southern NY
    Yeah i know where that is. Nice looking stove. Can you side load that stove? Not sure I want to be opening the front door all the time.
  16. Kitchen

    Kitchen New Member

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    Loc:
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    No, but the Jotul F 50 is essentially the same stove, but you can side load, top load and it has an ash pan. There is a grill sleeve that you can put in the top load to do some cooking as well.

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