How do you measure when cutting rounds?

bogydave Posted By bogydave, Jan 16, 2010 at 5:48 AM

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  1. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake
    Minister of Fire

    Jul 22, 2008
    17,139
    3,582
    Loc:
    Unity/Bangor, Maine
    HehHeh . . . I don't have the patience to be that exact when it comes to bucking wood. I generally eye-ball it or may use the saw's bar as a rough guide and then mark the tree with the saw's chain like Tony to give me an idea of where I will cut.

    My figuring is that as long as the wood fits in the stovebox it's good . . . I'm not trying to win any firewood beauty contests . . . generally the wood ends up around the same size. Occasionally some wood is longer and needs to be zinged down to size (typically before I load it in the woodshed) . . . and occasionally when I'm working with my buddy Joe the wood is a bit smaller than I like (because my buddy has a smaller sized woodstove and tends to cut smaller even when we're working on a load for me -- but who am I to complain when I'm getting free labor?)
     
  2. mayhem

    mayhem
    Minister of Fire

    May 8, 2007
    1,938
    4
    Loc:
    Peru, MA
    I eyeball it and I'm usually about an inch plus or minus from what I want. I'm building a sawbuck out of pallets, borrowing an idea I saw posted here...planning on marking out a spacer at about 18-20" so its quick and easy to make what I need. If I use a 2x4 chunk as my spacer I'll get both since its just a bit less than 2" thick.
     
  3. JBinKC

    JBinKC
    Feeling the Heat

    Jan 14, 2006
    289
    16
    Loc:
    Lake of the Ozarks
    When cutting most limbs for firewood typically I am more concerned about what cut will make a straighter piece that will make it easier to stack in a pile than being set upon a consistent set length.
     
  4. Eric A

    Eric A
    New Member

    Jan 19, 2010
    12
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    The mingo marker is pretty fast and ok on accuracy depending on how you use it.
     
  5. snowtime

    snowtime
    Minister of Fire

    Oct 31, 2007
    523
    0
    Loc:
    northern BC
    Like many I marked my bar years ago. I got so use to the length that I found myself not using the bar. That worked fine for the last 40 years but now I cut a short 17 to go NS in the new stove and I have to use the bar all over again. If I cutwithout it I get the old length. I wonder how long it will take me to be on auto again? Good test of the old dog rule.
     
  6. bogydave

    bogydave
    Minister of Fire

    Dec 4, 2009
    8,426
    3,446
    Loc:
    So Cent ALASKA
    That's my problem too. Plus add bifocal glasses. (sometimes have them, sometimes I don't)
    Old stove, anything less than 22" fit OK, now N/S (back/front) over 18" is too long.
    Not that I can't burn the longer ones during the day at an angle or E/W, but to load for a long burn 18" or a little less is perfect.
    The stick in the hole 3" from the tip is working great for me.
    I cut like the old days, fell, de-limb, top. Then in a few seconds, put on the stick & mark 17-3/4" in the log or mark & cut on anything less than 12" diameter.
    Faster than a tape, marks on the bar or long stick with marks on it & more accurate. Not as fast as I once was but now more accurate.
    Made one from an old fishing pole, Graphite! looks more professional :)
     

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  7. snowtime

    snowtime
    Minister of Fire

    Oct 31, 2007
    523
    0
    Loc:
    northern BC
    The real motivation for me to not measure but to get back to eyeballing it is speed. After I skid the tree and clean it up I lift the whole tree to waist height, usually the tree is 120' and cut from each side. I have to change sides now and then so the tree does not tilt but by doing this I save my back and I can cut as fast as I can lift the saw. It makes for mighty fast cutting and no issues with dirt or turning.
     
  8. bogydave

    bogydave
    Minister of Fire

    Dec 4, 2009
    8,426
    3,446
    Loc:
    So Cent ALASKA
    Nice system.
    120' logs (that's huge, 79 - 80 rounds @ 18" per tree) probably means a stick on the bar would be in the way due to diameter.
    But you could walk the tree & mark it with it on the saw, then take it off & get after it.
    You cut so much wood you don't need a measure, you just cut & I bet they're dead on.
    Would be good to have the tree waist high & just let the rounds fall, but I don't have the equipment for that. (yet, but is on my wish list)
     
  9. snowtime

    snowtime
    Minister of Fire

    Oct 31, 2007
    523
    0
    Loc:
    northern BC
    Yes when it comes to equipment I rate my tractor right up there. I recommend a 4+4 diesel. The 4 wheel drive means you can go down in a gravel pit and back out with your bucket loaded and you can skid a pretty good size tree. I do not want to break my tractor so I keep the skid trails clean,level and use long chokers to get into the forest. The diesel is self explanatory.
     
  10. bogydave

    bogydave
    Minister of Fire

    Dec 4, 2009
    8,426
    3,446
    Loc:
    So Cent ALASKA
    I'm envious & you're spoiled. :)
    In a good way.
     
  11. Eric A

    Eric A
    New Member

    Jan 19, 2010
    12
    0
    Does anybody use the mingo marker or know any thing about it????
     
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