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How do you measure when cutting rounds?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by bogydave, Jan 16, 2010.

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  1. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    HehHeh . . . I don't have the patience to be that exact when it comes to bucking wood. I generally eye-ball it or may use the saw's bar as a rough guide and then mark the tree with the saw's chain like Tony to give me an idea of where I will cut.

    My figuring is that as long as the wood fits in the stovebox it's good . . . I'm not trying to win any firewood beauty contests . . . generally the wood ends up around the same size. Occasionally some wood is longer and needs to be zinged down to size (typically before I load it in the woodshed) . . . and occasionally when I'm working with my buddy Joe the wood is a bit smaller than I like (because my buddy has a smaller sized woodstove and tends to cut smaller even when we're working on a load for me -- but who am I to complain when I'm getting free labor?)

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  2. mayhem

    mayhem Minister of Fire

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    I eyeball it and I'm usually about an inch plus or minus from what I want. I'm building a sawbuck out of pallets, borrowing an idea I saw posted here...planning on marking out a spacer at about 18-20" so its quick and easy to make what I need. If I use a 2x4 chunk as my spacer I'll get both since its just a bit less than 2" thick.
  3. JBinKC

    JBinKC Feeling the Heat

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    When cutting most limbs for firewood typically I am more concerned about what cut will make a straighter piece that will make it easier to stack in a pile than being set upon a consistent set length.
  4. Eric A

    Eric A New Member

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    The mingo marker is pretty fast and ok on accuracy depending on how you use it.
  5. snowtime

    snowtime Minister of Fire

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    Like many I marked my bar years ago. I got so use to the length that I found myself not using the bar. That worked fine for the last 40 years but now I cut a short 17 to go NS in the new stove and I have to use the bar all over again. If I cutwithout it I get the old length. I wonder how long it will take me to be on auto again? Good test of the old dog rule.
  6. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    That's my problem too. Plus add bifocal glasses. (sometimes have them, sometimes I don't)
    Old stove, anything less than 22" fit OK, now N/S (back/front) over 18" is too long.
    Not that I can't burn the longer ones during the day at an angle or E/W, but to load for a long burn 18" or a little less is perfect.
    The stick in the hole 3" from the tip is working great for me.
    I cut like the old days, fell, de-limb, top. Then in a few seconds, put on the stick & mark 17-3/4" in the log or mark & cut on anything less than 12" diameter.
    Faster than a tape, marks on the bar or long stick with marks on it & more accurate. Not as fast as I once was but now more accurate.
    Made one from an old fishing pole, Graphite! looks more professional :)

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  7. snowtime

    snowtime Minister of Fire

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    The real motivation for me to not measure but to get back to eyeballing it is speed. After I skid the tree and clean it up I lift the whole tree to waist height, usually the tree is 120' and cut from each side. I have to change sides now and then so the tree does not tilt but by doing this I save my back and I can cut as fast as I can lift the saw. It makes for mighty fast cutting and no issues with dirt or turning.
  8. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    Nice system.
    120' logs (that's huge, 79 - 80 rounds @ 18" per tree) probably means a stick on the bar would be in the way due to diameter.
    But you could walk the tree & mark it with it on the saw, then take it off & get after it.
    You cut so much wood you don't need a measure, you just cut & I bet they're dead on.
    Would be good to have the tree waist high & just let the rounds fall, but I don't have the equipment for that. (yet, but is on my wish list)
  9. snowtime

    snowtime Minister of Fire

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    Yes when it comes to equipment I rate my tractor right up there. I recommend a 4+4 diesel. The 4 wheel drive means you can go down in a gravel pit and back out with your bucket loaded and you can skid a pretty good size tree. I do not want to break my tractor so I keep the skid trails clean,level and use long chokers to get into the forest. The diesel is self explanatory.
  10. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    I'm envious & you're spoiled. :)
    In a good way.
  11. Eric A

    Eric A New Member

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    Does anybody use the mingo marker or know any thing about it????
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