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I need a pep talk. Getting discouraged with new Jotul Oslo...

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Koko, Dec 7, 2010.

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  1. nelraq

    nelraq Member

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    Just came on line a few minutes ago and read all three 3 pages of this thread.

    Your situation - re. slow, sluggish burns and the fire almost going out when you close the air down - is EXACTLY the same
    story that I had with my new Oslo - installed last fall.

    My wood was between 9 and 18%, but I even tried some store bought wood - still didn't work!

    I kept having folks here suggest that my problem must be poor draft; but I had a hard time believing that!

    My previous stove was a PE Spectrum with double walled pipe to the ceiling and insulated pipe through the attic and out -for a total of 14 feet (no elbows). this was way too much draft for the PE - I couldn't load it up or it would run away on me (every time!)
    So... how could draft possibly be an issue with the Oslo?

    Well...that was the problem. BE Green suggested that I try adding 3 feet of 6 inch single wall pipe to the chimney top. this didn't help much; so I added another 2 feet. Wow, completely different stove- very good draft and from 0 to 550 degrees in 'nothing flat'!!

    I ended up adding 5.5 feet of insulated pipe to the chimney. Now I have a great stove that heats quickly, burns overnight and looks great.

    I really think that you have 4 things going against you:
    1. Outside chimney
    2. 8 x 8 flue - I would definitely stick an insulated liner down there (that will solve problem 1 too)
    3. Chimney height - extend it by 5 or more feet - use temp pipe first to make sure it works (you could get some more 8X8 clay liners and stack them on top-keep adding until the stove is drafting well)
    4. The elbows are further restricting draft - not much you can do about this, but I think that you will be a 'happy camper' if you
    extend your chimney and line it.

    Great looking install BTW. You are going to love the Oslo once you get it working properly!

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  2. nelraq

    nelraq Member

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    I tried getting a EURO plate for the Oslo. Had no luck. They come with the Castine, but not with the Oslo

    I took the doghouse off and put a fairly thick washer on each of the bolts. this left a fairly good sized space between the doghouse and the stove - thus creating the possibility of a lot more combustion air. Didn't work; but thinking about it now, the Oslo wasn't drafting well enough to pull extra air into the stove!!

    If I put those washer back in now I would have way too must combustion air!
  3. Renovation

    Renovation New Member

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    +1 There ya go. I love seeing someone get this sort of help. Thanks for giving back, Nelraq.
  4. wendell

    wendell Minister of Fire

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    It does seem like you are going to need to raise your chimney and I am sure that lining it would really help, too. If you do add a liner, you wouldn't need to raise the masonry chimney as you could just have the liner extend up out the chimney the distance you need.

    What you can also do is have the stove pipe into a T and then extend the liner down also to the clean out door and put a cap on it to prevent an air leak.
  5. Skier76

    Skier76 Minister of Fire

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    Anyone know if the Castine Euro plate would fit on the Oslo?
  6. logger

    logger Minister of Fire

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    Great setup... I know the issues you're experiencing are frustrating, but you have some great advice here. Once you get the draft solved, you'll absolutely love the stove. It can keep our 2,000 sq ft in the mid 80s if need be and is a work horse. Even when you do fix the draft: when you first shut the door when starting a fire, the initial draft must shift from the side of the stove where the door was open, to the new air intake when the door shuts. Our fires usually simmer down for just a few minutes after we shut the door, but pick right back up after a few moments once the draft shifts and gets going.. just a pointer.
  7. mikepinto65

    mikepinto65 Minister of Fire

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    Im not too sure its going to be the draft. I know the OP stated he tried a moisture meter, but I just got off the phone with his firewood dealer who informed me the wood has been off the stump for two years and cut/split for a few weeks (we live close, and I was going to buy from the guy). The Oslo is picky when it comes to dry wood. If I put anything in mine with 25%, or higher, the fire snuffs out and takes forever to become stable without having to open the door to revive it. Im not sold on the accuracy of half the moisture meters out there to be honest. I think its the wood.

    Koko, did you try burning the Kiln dried wood you bought yet or just the smaller splits? If not, try that out and let us know (but don't load the stove up with it, put three pieces in on a nice coal bed).

    Edit: I agree that the chimney has to be raised, and will greatly improve performance of the stove, but I just have a feeling that the moister meter is way off. No wood split a few weeks earlier is going to be dry enough.

    Edit again: Looking at the first picture of this post, looks like a 16" split in the stove. The wood that was cut/split a few weeks ago was 18" wood, so maybe its not the same batch. (try the kiln dried wood still if you havnt yet!).
  8. Koko

    Koko Member

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    Mike,

    I ordered my wood a ways back. I've got 16" splits. If you came and checked out the wood, you can see it's been split for a good while. Maybe I'll throw you a few pieces to try out if you'd want. When I bought from him this pile had been sitting split for a good while.

    I've only put a split of the kiln dried in there. But it was mixed with the other splits so I never noticed a difference.

    I'm still leaning towards draft. this morning with some red coals, I put in some small splits. It was smoldering a bit, I cracked the window right near me and "poof" flames were going and the wood caught.

    After measuring my chimney, I really think it's that unfortunately. Althought I'm not keen on the idea of extending it up with pipe. I'd rather add another 3 feet with clay tile and brick so it all matches. It will be a little more aesthically (sp?) pleasing in my eyes.
  9. Shari

    Shari Minister of Fire

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    Would an OAK help? New house = tight build.

    Shari
  10. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    In a earlier post you said the window did not help, I am confused.
  11. mikepinto65

    mikepinto65 Minister of Fire

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    Ya, if thats the case than an OAK would be needed I would think.
  12. Koko

    Koko Member

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    I'm learning here. I did have the window open on previous fires to try and help, but I did not see a noticeable difference. This morning, since I was working with just red coals, I looked over at the window, shrugged and said what the hell. Try opening it again. Once I did, there was more flame.

    What exactly is an OAK besides a species of wood?
  13. mikepinto65

    mikepinto65 Minister of Fire

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    outside air intake
    Sometimes new homes are so tight, that the stove isn't able to "breath" properly.
  14. Skier76

    Skier76 Minister of Fire

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    Yep, what "The Hoff" said. Koko, think of my "Turbo Jotul" setup. But remove the hair dryer and have the flex duct going outside instead.
  15. Later

    Later New Member

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    There was a thread a while back with a Jotul, maybe a Castine, that had the stove air lever dislodged sometime during delivery and although the lever moved, it didn't effect the flame.
  16. Koko

    Koko Member

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    That's worth looking too. When I let the fire go out this week so the chimney cap can get installed, I'll pull the plate and see if the lever is working correctly. There is a good amount of free play in the lever but it feels like something is moving a little bit.

    Sounds silly but does anyone have a picture of a properly burning fire in an oslo hovering around 500 degrees? I'd like a comparison.
  17. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

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    I had a tall (26 feet) outside masonry chimney.
    Enough draft to need a flue damper.
    They can cool off too quick.
    I had my share of smoke in the house from not building a quick hot little fire on a new charge of wood hoping the small amount of coals and heat in the stove and a couple small splits would be enough to get back going again. Always colder outside than I thought . :)
  18. mikepinto65

    mikepinto65 Minister of Fire

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    Heres two links of it in action.

    First mine: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W5HY0f8Xo44

    And second I believe by WoodButcher: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s6fXfjVQ9hE
  19. Koko

    Koko Member

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    What temp were you running at in that video Mike?

    Why was the flame so blue in woodbutchers vid, was it just lighting?
  20. gizmos

    gizmos Member

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    Koko,
    I also think that you have two issues to deal with. One being the chimney height. The other is the cold down draft under the second floor section of chimney that you are using for an up draft.
    I was curious about whats on the first floor? Is there an open fire place? Are you planning to vent another stove onto the chimney? Or is there nothing?

    Considering your options, If you are willing to spend the money to have you mason raise your brick chimney four to five feet, that would be nice. The brick looks great. If not, I would put a top plate on and run four feet of triple wall insulated pipe up.

    I really don't think just extending the chimney four feet is going to solve your problem. I would run a 6" insulated SS liner (pipe) down to the thimble at a 90.
    Just clean the pipe from the thimble up, instead of trying to climb on the out side of the chimney. I think this will solve the cold down draft issue and the 8X8 draft issue and the insulated liner verses and non-insulated clay flute liner issue.

    Ill follow your thread and see how things turn out. Good luck.
  21. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    That was my first thought, well second thought. The first one was why would anyone build a new house and stick a chimney outside? Second thought was to move the stove downstairs.

    One thing to check is the cleanout door. It should be gasketed, air tight. If not, now is going to be a tough time to seal it, but you could try some mortite caulk on it.
  22. ansehnlich1

    ansehnlich1 Minister of Fire

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    yaya gizmos, that's what I told him back in post #16

    I also have yet to hear anything in this thread about this earlier post of mine, but hey, it ain't my place to tell somebody how to build a chimney....

    "I wanted to comment that the Jotul Oslo manual states a wall pass through must have 12 inches of non-combustible surrounding the thimble, meaning no drywall, framing, or other flammables within 12 inches of the thimble, meaning basically a 30 inch square/circle of masonry through which the thimble passes. The manual also has a clear diagram indicating how to construct such a wall pass through."

    Koko says his double wall only needs 6 inches to combustibles, but I interpret the manual to mean otherwise in terms of thimble/wall pass through construction.

    I too have been following this thread.
  23. r_d_gard

    r_d_gard Member

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    Now here is an interesting thought. I also like the idea of gasketing the inspection port at the bottom of the chimney
  24. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    Mine was pulling in a little air and I just duct taped it, did not make a noticeable difference but if the leak was bad enough it could.
  25. mikepinto65

    mikepinto65 Minister of Fire

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    I don't remember the exact temp, but it was just hitting 500 when I turned the air down. The difference in color may have been the difference in wood species.
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