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looking for a new stove for next winter

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Cornelis, Feb 6, 2013.

  1. Cornelis

    Cornelis Member

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    I get it close to 600. And at the the end the air goes all the way open and also open the the door a little.
    Maybe at night I should open the air just a little. And I am really looking to get extra air to the back of the stove.

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  2. Bluerubi

    Bluerubi Member

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    That could quite possible be the worst stove design imaginable. They have some of their statements correct, but are using heat transfer very wrong. Aluminum is a great conductor of heat, and surface area is great for radiant heat transfer, but shiny aluminum is pretty much the worst possible surface you can have for giving off radiant energy. If you look at emissivity tables, shiny aluminum surfaces is something you would use to help retain heat (aluminum pipe jacketing), not give it off. If you had a hot oil jacket surrounding the stove that you wanted to heat using aluminum would be a great choice, but otherwise you'd be better off painting the whole thing flat black with high temp stove paint.

    Maybe I'm missing something, but if they really think their high surface area aluminum is helping things out, then I'd call into question the rest of their stove since the most basic function of a woodstove (IR heat) isn't even correct.
  3. Cornelis

    Cornelis Member

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    I have no clue about all the tech stuff but it was interesting and was just wondering if that stove could work with all that aluminum.
    From what I understood cars use aluminum heads s and they get very hot.
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    If your chimney top is reasonably accessible I would try adding some more height. You could try this by using some cheap galvanized 6" round duct and inserting it crimp down into the liner. If you notice a good improvement in the burn then make the extension permanent with stainless.

    Also, rake the coals forward to the front of the stove for a better burn down.
  5. Cornelis

    Cornelis Member

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    So you think the height is not en off. Is there a reason that there is no air intake in the back of the stove to get the coals burned faster.
    Maybe the wood is not dry en off I have big peaces so this season I will split a little smaller so they have more chance to dry out
  6. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    It's normal for your stove to burn front to back. Try one thing at a time and observe if there is an improvement.
  7. ddahlgren

    ddahlgren Feeling the Heat

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    With my experience of buying wood in CT it generates a question. Somewhere you mentioned cut and split 2 years ago. Did you have possetion of the wood for2 years and cut and split? If not it is not 2 years. There are calendar years dog years and wood salesman years. For every calendar year there are between 14 and 18 wood splitter years.. I have had better luck with some small diameter maple splits trimmed from a neighbors tree last summer than anything a wood dealer sold me as 'seasoned'.. Unless my Rutland thermometer has lies again the maple got the stove top to 700 at 4 am after a 3 am wake up call to hit the head and do a relight. An all time high for me and this 19 year old stove. It did make a lot of coals doing it but running at 650 now with a 4 inch bright red bed of coals heating quite fine. It will be perfect to toss some marginal splits on as with that many coals they have no choice to burn.
  8. Cornelis

    Cornelis Member

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    I get my own wood never buy wood. So yah I had it for 2 years and maybe I had a load that was not completely dry. If I have 4" of coal there is not much room to fill the stove. Maybe I should cut some of them 16" so I can lay them from west to east see if that will do a little better. And I will take the heat shield of and see if the air intake is still working ok
  9. ddahlgren

    ddahlgren Feeling the Heat

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    OK this west east north south has me a bit confused though maybe understand it correctly. When I hold a compass North is facing away from me and south is aimed at me and east weat is right left.. is that what everyone is saying? being a machinist i I think in x y and z z being up down y forward and back and x left right..
  10. Cornelis

    Cornelis Member

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    With the size logs I have now I can only load from the front to the back but if I cut them 16" I can load left to right,so you are correct
  11. Hearth Mistress

    Hearth Mistress Minister of Fire

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    You got it....
    North/South = load the stove with the ends facing front/back, depth of stove
    East/West = load stove ends facing left/right, width of stove
  12. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    Coaling is a stage in the combustion process. It's going to happen in any stove. Switching stoves isn't going to change that. Some wood species burn with different characteristics, as well. If your wood isn't dry enough, you're going to end up with more coals. If you reload too soon, and don't let them burn down, you'll end up with a stove full and no room for wood.

    You need to try different techniques to make it work for you. I pull the coals in from the sides and back, pile them up in front if the door, and open the air up. If I need more heat than that can give, I put a small split on top. I have to do this a couple of times. My stove can make A LOT of coals.
    PapaDave likes this.
  13. Cornelis

    Cornelis Member

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    Maybe I should try a few thinks like that saves me of buying a new stove.
  14. ddahlgren

    ddahlgren Feeling the Heat

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    Got it If i did a north south load it would be silly short wood. Compared to most my little stove is a toy but takes over 80% of heating the first floor when in single digits when 30 something it will keep the first floor in the 70's and second floor in the mid 60s and for me a good sleeping temperature..With my bacon / misery wood I am splitting down even at 20% measured MC I find myself loading several of them at a time as to not overwhelm the stove with wet wood or damp wood. With the 2 year + stuff I jam in as much as I can in big splits east west and let it go on a slow burn lasting about 4 hours for me and 6 hours of heat. The most I seem to go through of good dry wood is about 1 cord a month.maybe more now burning down these small splits. but they are only 14 to 16 inches long and around the size of a 2 x 3 so more like kindling..LOL...
  15. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid Member

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    I am going to jump in here since I have a lot in common with the OP. I have a Heatilator WINS18 which is essentially a WS22 made into an insert with a slightly smaller firebox. The internal designs and overall construction are the same. My chimney is very short, even shorter than the 15' the OP has. Mine is 12'5". I am also new to burning, starting only this year. I also live in CT so I have been heating against the same temps. Lastly, I am heating a living area not all that much larger than his 1100sqft.

    I have heated my home exclusively with wood since the stove was installed in mid-Nov. It took a few weeks to get the stove figured out as far as netting the best performance and balance of adequate stove temp and burn time duration. From what is being told, it sounds like everything is being done properly for an adequate heat output. Using dry wood, loading up N/S, bringing the stove up to 500-600 degrees. I do the exact same thing. I average a realistic 8hr burn times. This is from the time I load the firebox, until I am left with noting but a hot coal bed and a 300 degree stove top. When ever possible, like if I am home, I do feather the air intake depending on what stage of the burn cycle I am in, and this helps. Example, wide open getting it going, then as the temp starts to quickly rise, I gradually bring it back until it is all the way down and I am rolling at 625 degrees. After a couple hours and the heat falls to around 500 or so, I will bring the air up a 1/3 and let it cruise. The last couple hours I open the air all the way up and let it run until I am left with noting but a hot bed of coals.

    The conclusion I am coming up with is that the house itself may be the culprit. Because, as was mentioned, that stove should be able to roast you out of the room. And it sounds lke everything is being done properly to do so.

    How is the insulation? The windows/doors? Someting is amiss......?
  16. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    One thing we haven't discussed is the house. If the house is a leaky sieve, a bigger stove may keep you more comfortable, but with more wood consumed. You might want to have an energy audit done on the house. It could be a good investment, especially if you follow up on recommendations.
  17. dougand3

    dougand3 Minister of Fire

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    That Made Right Stove Co is scary. Reading their literature, they have taken common safety knowledge about stoves and flue temps and just chunked it.
    1. Don't give any clearances.
    2. Don't use a screen on raincap - too much creosote.
    3. Get a "Heat Bandit" (aka Magic Heat) to further cool flue.
    As noted above - stove sitting on carpet in brochure....SOMEBODY will install like that cuz "it's in the picture, therefore must be ok"
  18. ddahlgren

    ddahlgren Feeling the Heat

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    At least they did not call 'aircraft aluminum'. The looks a lot like a fire in the trash can and about as safe. Wait until they come out with a ventless model..LOL
  19. Cornelis

    Cornelis Member

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    thanks for the reply...I know the house is drafty that is why I installed a oak and that helped a lot. I also play with the air intake but still have to open the stove door to burn the coals down.
    Can somebody tell me how big the opening has to be for the air that cleans the glass in the door.
  20. mfglickman

    mfglickman Minister of Fire

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    Big unsplit wood takes...halfway to forever? A long time. A lot longer than split, even if it's split big...

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