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New used boiler set up options

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by Moose, Dec 18, 2007.

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  1. Moose

    Moose New Member

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    Just bought over 30' of triple wall insulated stainless chimney and the guy had an older (1980) boiler and threw it in for free. The unit it self was only used for one winter then the city ordinance stoped the burning of solid fuels with in town limits, the thing looks great for being almost 28yrs old. The boiler has a massive fire box and a jig saw puzzle of grates and drawers in it. it has pipes that run through fire box where you can mount a fan to blow air through it and the boiler part of it just has piping that runs the inside of the outer walls of the fire box. If nothing else I know I can gut it and get a real nice forced air heater, but I would love to attach it to my existing boiler and utilize some radiant floor heating as well as the dhw that the existing furnace/boiler heats. I guess my question is with the wood boiler I have described is this safe and feasable. I am pretty confident that I have plenty of dumping sites to keep the thing from overheating but I'm not sure how to effectivly turn the pumps on to run to push the heat to the dump sites before the boiler temp reaches that critical point. I am pretty handy with projects like this once guided in the correct direction and I have been heating with wood for 28+ yrs wood stoves only though. Thanks for any help in advanced. I will get the make and model when I go home and some pics.

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  2. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    Ogdensburg. Another new member from the North Country. Chilly up your way this morning, I understand. Welcome to the Boiler Room, Moose.

    First off, what kind of boiler is it? If you don't have a name, post a picture. Odds are, somebody around here either has, has used one, or knows somebody who does.

    Moving the water around is not a big deal. You have to do some plumbing and put in some aquastats and pumps, but that's all just basic wiring and sweating copper pipe. If you can do that, you'll be fine. Of course, you can get as fancy as you like with computer controls--and we've got people who are into that--but if you get the pumps and aquastats (basically just thermostats for hot water) in the right places, you can make it do everything it needs to do. If I can understand it, I bet you can.
  3. Moose

    Moose New Member

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    Yeah a little chilly and I think it must have snowed because my back seems a bit sore. I'll definatly get some pics when I get home on wednesday. If I remember correctly it has Thermobilt Provider III stamped on the front of it.
  4. Moose

    Moose New Member

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    pictures of the stove

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  5. Moose

    Moose New Member

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    inside firebox heat exchangers

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  6. Moose

    Moose New Member

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    some how I got the pictures of the heat exchangers upside down.
  7. Moose

    Moose New Member

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    back of unit

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  8. Moose

    Moose New Member

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    more upside down pics sorry.
  9. sparke

    sparke Minister of Fire

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    That looks very similar to http://www.thermocontrolheating.com/cut_away_view.htm. Similar name too. I wouldnt be surprised if this is the same company.
    I believe the unit you have is a stove/boiler. Meaning approx. 1/2 of the BTU's are from radiant heat and the other energy goes into the water...
  10. atlarge54

    atlarge54 New Member

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    Looks pretty nice for the price. What is the temp control? Is there a bimetal spring on the door to control air intake? I think I'd be a bit nervous operating w/o pump and battery backup in case of power failure.
  11. Moose

    Moose New Member

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    It does have a bimetal spring in the door. not sure if it functions properly or not but its there. Why would I want to use that instead of just controlling the draft manually. I do have a mother of a pump that came with it. I don't think I have ever seen a domestic water pump of this size. It reminds me of a fuel transfer pump I'll take a pic if you like.
  12. BrownianHeatingTech

    BrownianHeatingTech Minister of Fire

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    To keep it from over-heating the water.

    Probably an old Taco 110 or something similar. Separate pump and motor? Probably with a spring coupler between the two?

    Joe
  13. Moose

    Moose New Member

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    here's what it is Don't know much about it. Is it worth using or should I get one of the little ones like I have on the rest of my systemt. pretty big motor I wonder about electric consumption.

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  14. Bartman

    Bartman Member

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    Get rid of that dinosaur circulator and get a small compact style, the Taco 007 series is a favorite of a lot of guys, personally, I don't like it. Over the years I've seen several that had their cartridges seize up, real easy to change but only $3 less tahn a new circulator. There is a new kid in town, the Grundfos UPS 15 with a built in check valve, it's 3 speed and only about $60. The multi-speed gives you flexibility. They also consume a lot less power.
  15. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    I like the Grundfos pumps, too. I've burned up a couple of Taco 007s, but had some go for a good long time. Shop for both on Ebay.
  16. Bartman

    Bartman Member

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    It's funny that you say that because yes, I have seen Tacos go years without requiring replacement, but others no good. There was a customer of mine that was having problems with his heat but the Taco was running, I took it apart and found a stub for an impeller. Before the Grundfos's I used B&G;Upstarts, they were pretty good, but I had to replace 2 out 4 over 20yrs. The earlier Grundfos pumps weren't that great either, I've seen their speed controls quit prematurely. Speaking of premature, although I so far love the new Grundfos, let's see how long they last..............
  17. Moose

    Moose New Member

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    get rid of the dinosaur, check
  18. BrownianHeatingTech

    BrownianHeatingTech Minister of Fire

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    Take apart a Taco and a Grundfos. Look at the machining and design quality inside the pump (where it counts). I think you'll buy Grundfos...

    Joe
  19. mtfallsmikey

    mtfallsmikey New Member

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    That is an old B & G 100 circ...newer wet-rotor circs will outpump this thing all day long. Less maintanence too.
  20. avocation

    avocation New Member

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    Hi , that is a Thermo-control unit... they are out of cobleskil n.y. now. I have one of those stove/ boilers and it works great.
    All parts are available for that stove. My heat exchangers are schedule 40 stainless, not sure what they were using then.
    I have mine feeding an 80 gallon electric water heater ( for a storage buffer) tied in with the gas boiler. I installed a taco 07 to circulate from the wood boiler to the storage tank and found that it is not needed. It themo siphons just fine, I do have an 07 from the tank to the gas boiler.

    they are good stoves, just run em hot, they are creosote machines if you don't.
    dave
  21. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    Welcome to the Boiler Room, mtfallsmikey and Woodboat dave! Thanks for your help.
  22. Moose

    Moose New Member

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    Thank you for all the help. Dave, does your unit have a bunch of grates and a large steel box on the inside of the fire box. Mine came with a whole load of stuff but I havn't the slightest clue where it all goes. I'm assuming that it is to keep the fire, coals, ash from directly comming in contact with the heat exchangers on the side. So you have no problem heating your dhw with that thing huh. I was hoping to get some radiant floor heat do you think it is up to the job?
  23. Moose

    Moose New Member

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    Quick question. I have an oil furnace in the basement uses class A chimney I don't use it other than to heat the dhw. when I install the wood boiler my plan is to turn the oil burner completely off. If I do this is there any reason that I cannot use the existing chimney for my wood boiler completely remove the oil burner and soley use the wood boiler. and if I do turn the burner off completely all the circulating pumps and the heat systyem should work just like normal so I would basiclly be using the oil burner as water movement system since its already there and there will be a furnace for the next person in the house to use. I'm confident I will not ever have to turn the furnace on for heat. this is my first winter in this house but I havn't used it yet and its been 3yrs since I've burnt any fuel but wood in my last house for heat. does any one see any problems with doing this....
  24. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    I don't see why not. As long as you disconnect the oil burner and just use it as a distribution vessel for the hot water from your wood boiler, I think that would be OK. Of course, that begs the question, what are you going to do for a backup, say when you go on vacation in the winter? Are you going to powervent the oil burner, or hook it back to up the chimney? That might present a code issue, though as a practical matter, if you swept the chimney before reconnecting the oil, it would get by me. But I'm not a code enforcement officer or your insurance company.

    What kind of wood boiler are you thinking about putting in?
  25. Moose

    Moose New Member

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    I guess its not a true boiler. Its the one I posted pictures in the begining of the post. I'm not familiar with the power vent option. Cheaper? well to answer you question. I don't usually go on vacation in the winter, I'm only hope to only have one chimney for this winter and install the other one this summer. I have the other chinmey already, but I just can't decide how I want to run it. My major problem is the best place for me to run the wood chimney is directly under the peak of the roof. some of the guys suggested running and offset so that it was a foot to either side of the peak but the only place I would be able to do that is in the master bedroom and my wife does not want to see any stainless as it is let alone a couple of elbows thrown in there. see there is no attic in that part of the house, vaulted celings. What I would like to do is run both stainless pipes straight side by side for appox 30' then tie the two of them in to an old masonry chimney for the last 3-4' but I don't think that I can do that even though I don't think that I would have a problem. with back draft or to much exaust volume for the masonry chimney. who knows.
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