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Not trying to poke a grizzly....

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by metalsped, Nov 18, 2012.

  1. Bret Chase

    Bret Chase Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2013
    Messages:
    648
    Loc:
    Maine
    I don't choke it down... I control heat by fuel load and the exhaust damper... I generally only start closing the air once the stack gets past 450... or it becomes stifling in my house...

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  2. Bret Chase

    Bret Chase Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2013
    Messages:
    648
    Loc:
    Maine
    I've got a 275 oil tank that I'm going to turn into a smoker... just haven't had the elusive confluence of time and money to tackle that project.... yet
  3. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    Perfect, some of the older stoves worked well, they were not all junk like some would have you believe.
  4. Bret Chase

    Bret Chase Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2013
    Messages:
    648
    Loc:
    Maine
    My BnB I would classify as working... ok... it does what I need it to do. I can see several design issues that could be easily worked out... but in the long run, I'd rather just replace it with a stove that someone else has spent the R&D money on....
  5. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    27,984
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    Nashua was king. All hail Nashua. I cringe every time somebody signs up and says "I just replaced my Nashua stove with a new EPA stove.". I know what is coming. For months. >> In one guy's case, uh hum, for years.

    ATTN Nashua owners: Keep it. Love it. Don't change a thing. Burn on.
  6. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    Once again you seem to have a bug up your butt, seasoned oak touched on why my old stove worked well for me, quick heat, the way the house is built the cement gives up heat back in the house over night and quick heat in the morning brought the temp up quickly. Plus I bought a smaller stove which was not a good idea, is their a bigger stove then the summit that takes a 6 inch flue, if I could sell my stove and get a bigger one I would.
    The Nashua was a big hunk of steel nothing more, had a baffle so a little better them some and built like a tank.
    Never said it was better then the new stoves, I said it worked better in my situation.
  7. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    I will refrain from posting if it bothers you that bad.
  8. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    27,984
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    Born with a bug up my butt. ;lol I am a hard headed old man. You can relate.

    But for seven years Nashua owners have always been the ones that stopped in to crap on their new EPA stoves. If they like'em, keep'em. No knock against the stoves. If it works don't fix it.

    FYI: If my old pre-EPA insert hadn't cracked I would probably be still burning in it instead of the new, in 2006, stove. But I am so happy it cracked now.
    jjs777_fzr likes this.
  9. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    Ok I am going to answer this and I am done with it.
    I gave my expeirence with my new stove vs the old one, I dont remember crapping on the EPA stoves (dont understand that, both you and BG seem to have a hang up)

    I bought a smaller stove which was not a good idea and stated that, should have went with a 4 CF firebox so apples to apples.

    The Nashua is in the shop and might have the first fire toninght and planned on giving a real world comparison now that I have burnt the summit for 3 years but screw that, unless I totaly bash it you will acuse me of worshiping the God of Nashua.

    Please see a doctor about that bug.;)
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 4, 2013
  10. Frank625

    Frank625 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2013
    Messages:
    36
    Loc:
    Near Mooresville, North Carolina
    I like my stove because it works great for what I need it for. I like to walk around in shorts and a tee shirt no matter how cold it gets outside. It heats my entire 1250 sq/ft home. I can get 12 hour burns and I don't have to worry about the exact amount of moisture that is in my wood. I can burn rounds in it as well. I don't have a moisture meter or an IR temp probe. No expensive glass door either. I can put my hand on the wall near the flue and I know if it's burning right. It's a tool and it works just fine. I saved enough money on my electric bill, the first month I payed for my entire stove investment. I cut wood on my own property. If I had to buy wood I probably wood find an alternative. I have been running stoves, fireplaces and cutting wood since I was a kid. EPA stoves are great if you want one. I guess I didn't know I needed one. Then again,I didn't know you were supposed to have a tattoo to ride a Harley,and I learned to ride a motorcycle on a custom chopper 33 years ago at the age of 16. I owned and operated a custom motorcycle shop for 6 years. I currently ride a Harley Street Glide, I guess I better get with it and get an EPA wood stove and a tattoo......what will my peers think........lol.
  11. Bone1099

    Bone1099 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2009
    Messages:
    165
    Loc:
    Northwest GA
    Wood man wood! I love to cut firewood. I have a buddy with an Englander NC-30 and he cant burn half the wood i can with the big Fish insert. We cut firewood together have a dang good time doing it and i can burn twice as much wood as he can. Ok OK kidding. In reality the wife says if i redo the hearth the rest of the kitchen/dining room must be done as well and no new stove until it is all finished. Therefore im still burning the big Fish. Good news for the environment. With dry wood you cant restrict enough air to make it smoke much unless you really try but then the house gets cold and she really doesnt like that. When it gets cold i really have to open her up and throw plenty of wood throughout the night to keep warm. he he he. And with that kind of use i rarely see smoke unless its just after reload. he he he. sorry i couldnt help myself .
  12. Bone1099

    Bone1099 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2009
    Messages:
    165
    Loc:
    Northwest GA
    Frank is awesome
  13. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    Since I put my old stove in the shop I have had a couple of fires, the first one was a small one and did not get the flue temp much over 250 and it smoked all the time.
    Next fire was a bigger one and the flue temp reached about 450, at some point in time (guessing around 350) it stoped smoking and did not smoke the rest of the burn.
    Glad to hear some observed the same lack of smoke from a "smoke dragon".
    I do burn the same dry wood as my epa stove, I wont burn wet wood not even in a camp fire.
  14. bsruther

    bsruther Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2008
    Messages:
    689
    Loc:
    Northern Kentucky
    I'll be buying an EPA stove before the winter's over, but with much apprehension.
    I've been tweaking my Buck stove for seven years and my wood dryness has gotten much better also.
    I'm at the point now where I can load it at 10 pm and have hot coals at 6:30.
    When I light the stove, I open the air all the way, wait about 20 mins, close the air down most of the way and
    it's good to go and my chimney is only 13 ft. No diddling with anything or opening doors
    When it's choked I get smoke, but not that much, not nearly as much as the stationary steam locomotives I see in the area.

    Oh yeah, one more thing, my stove's about 30 years old.I've changed the fan motor once and the gaskets last about 3 years. Will I get 30 years out of my EPA stove?

    It will be great if the EPA stove lives up to the hype and I'd love to be using a third less wood, but I'm not counting on either of those things. If it's all true, I'll be the first to admit I'm wrong.
  15. WASPKFD

    WASPKFD New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2013
    Messages:
    55
    Loc:
    Iowa

    AWESOME another buck owner!!!! Im a new /old buck owner BUCK 2800 and ready to feed the fire!!! CHEERS!!!!
  16. Baker_Falcon

    Baker_Falcon New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2013
    Messages:
    26
    Loc:
    Millersburg Pennsylvania
    To answer your question:

    I use a pre-EPA stove because it was there when I bought the house and it is my first winter and I want to determine if it is worth the time and energy to burn wood. New to wood stoves but not new to wood burning. I am somewhat of a frugal person so I decided to give it a try instead of rolling over and forking over $2,500 this winter to the local fuel oil company. Had a certified pro come out and check everything to make sure I am safe and the terra cotta chimney was in good shape and clean (yes it is a slammer install). Stove is in great shape. Got a custom cap put on the chimney. Bought some quality wood from a guy that has been selling my family wood for years (yes it is seasoned, no I didn't need a moisture meter to determine that). It was in the high 20s low 30s at night this weekend and 85-90 degrees in my living room and 73 in my bedrooms in a 1,200 sq foot brick ranch with a fan pointed from the bedrooms towards the stove. Stove door temp around 350-400 degrees. EPA or no EPA, to me it works great. Burn hot fires, watch the temps, use good quality wood. I also come from the school of "don't fix it if it isn't broken".

    If things go well this year I will *consider* an upgrade to a newer smaller stove next year with a liner, etc... (so far leaning towards the regency) . However unlikely, I might change my tune sooner if there are flames shooting out of my chimney. This stove I have now might be a bit too big for my house. I also like the idea of burning less wood in a newer stove. The old one shouldn't be a hard sell in my area. Taking that beast out the door, now that might be difficult.

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  17. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2008
    Messages:
    3,644
    Loc:
    Eastern Central PA
    I use 4 EPA stoves and 4 NON EPA Stoves.(In different locations of course) Only 1 of the NON epa stoves is factory made. That would be the Longwood,so named as you can put a 5' piece of wood in there. Made from a SS tube about the size of a 30 gallon water heater. The rest are self made, 2 from oil tanks and 1 barrel stove and all work very well for their application. In general i use the NON epa stoves for quick heat in larger rooms and areas,and the EPA Stoves for the Long Burns in smaller insulated spaces. They all work well.
  18. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2008
    Messages:
    3,644
    Loc:
    Eastern Central PA
    Can you imaging the heat coming off the sides and top of a 275 gallon oil tank stove,awesome! Need three box fans to keep it from overheating.
  19. Saltylady

    Saltylady Member

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2011
    Messages:
    5
    Loc:
    Eastern Shore of MD
    I really did not research to see what the difference was in wood stoves - just knew that this one was 350 and within our budget. 1980's ish Kodiak double door wood stove that the original owners sold due to chimney issues and could no longer burn. Our house is rented so it may end up staying after we leave in a couple years. We plan on building on our farm and would buy a new stove. Also we are installing thru wall chimney system and that is costing some $$$$. Our house is a very old very large farm house with newer windows, however, leaks just as an old farm house would. This will help our heating cost since fuel oil for hot water baseboard is pricey. Plus my husband's business is landscape management which includes tree removal so we have all the wood we needas well as the wood we take from our farm.

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