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Slotta Hedge

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by lukem, Dec 28, 2012.

  1. osagebow

    osagebow Minister of Fire

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    Next time you get that wavy stuff, split it into bowstaves and sell it on e-bay. I've seen 65" long, 5" wide "snake staves" go for a coupla hunderd bucks!
    Applesister likes this.

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  2. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

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    How do they split them. I've split rails for fence before but I dont see that happening with this stuff.
  3. osagebow

    osagebow Minister of Fire

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    I've used axe heads in addition to wedges. They'll still split with the grain, but get stringy. A skill saw or sawzall can help, but you have to be careful, of course. You clean up the stringy edges with a drawknife later. After splitting, you seal the ends to prevent checking, I use shellac thinned by half with alcohol thinner..A few weeks later you take off the bark and sapwood and and seal the back. Keep a wide growth ring down 1-3 rings down from where you remove the bark. That clean, unbroken growth ring will be the "back" of the bow (the side facing the target) and .must be as pristine as possible. Staves that Reflex, or bend opposite the way they will in a finished bow, are also premium. This is an e bay example probably worth 100 bucks easy. He has it worked down to a single ring on the back here. snakey.JPG

    Here's a finished one, not mine, this guy's GOOD! snakey2.jpg
  4. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover Minister of Fire

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    Is that the chain being slammed back into the underside of the bar or grit in the bark? Doesn't seem possible that the wood itself could spark, no matter how 'hard' it is...
  5. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover Minister of Fire

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    I know you've got a ton of Hedge stacked. Me? I would have a hard time giving up on the idea of stacking more. I've got maybe half a cord. I do have a couple gnarly rounds in that last load that I stuffed in my car, but nothing near that big. _g
  6. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

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    Not exactly sure. I saw some sparks when I was noodling and was way past the bark. Could have been some grit that got trapped inside the tree or was carried in by insects. Could be the chain begging for mercy. idk
  7. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Hedge/osage and a couple of others that are cousins pick up silica while growing, along with their bark being notorious for storing airborn grit. The combo of the two means that you are probably gonna throw a spark now and again while cutting. And yes, this does dull your chain faster. A semi-chisel chain is probably a better choice than full chisel if you have that option.

    Lukem - I wish I were closer. My splitter makes short work out of those big stumps. It was designed for the big stuff.

    Edit for clarification: It doesn't technically "pick up" the silica, but more so "encapsulates" - at least that is my understanding. Typically you will find more of this towards the lower rounds of big trees.
  8. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

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    Now that you mention that, I did know that. If you've ever seen hedge that's been milled, it has a certain "glint" to it...kinda like a metallic paint. It's purdy stuff.
  9. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    You wanna see sparks? Run a slab of that stuff through a planer.:eek:
  10. Flatbedford

    Flatbedford Minister of Fire

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    Those are monsters! It does look a little like Black Locust, but I have never had much of a problem splitting Black Locust.
  11. Bret Chase

    Bret Chase Minister of Fire

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    I had a 19" BL trunk split stop my 29 ton splitter dead this afternoon... I eventually won.... it did make for some hilarious splits..... one that make the 12 year old crack up.... I kept that one.... lol
  12. Redlegs

    Redlegs Feeling the Heat

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    If you were cutting in a fence row, becareful near the bottom for barbed wire grown into the trunk. I've never had sparks fly from crosscutting or noodling, but I have hit wire and nails that slowed me down.

    BTW, that is is a serious round of hedge!
  13. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover Minister of Fire

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    Interesting...
    Redlegs likes this.
  14. Applesister

    Applesister Minister of Fire

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    Im so glad to have seen a split from this trunk of Osage and come across your thread again. I saw the interlocking grain pattern in your first picture you posted, from the end grain of the round. It looked like some Rock Elm I split last summer. Your Split you just posted was exactly the same result. Beautiful looking wood for many uses.
    My brother told me of Locust causeing sparks with a chainsaw too. What I got my hands on last year was Shipmast locust. It was straight as an arrow. Split like a dream and seasoned well within one year.
    Thank you for posting all this...oh...I was gonna say you should save the noodling shavings and dry them and add parafin wax and make firestarters with them.
    Just remember..."If theres a horse that can never be rode, then theres a man that can never be throwed." ;-)
    Redlegs likes this.

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