2022-2023 BK everything thread

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stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
6,282
Long Island NY
So I've been married a long time, most of my life to my high school girlfriend. It is easier for me to open a door to accomplish my brief task than to send the wife to first turn off the drier and then turn it back on. It's not like she's standing there with it and if I make her chore difficult then I'll be the one doing laundry!

This is only a few times a year. No big deal. I put the seat down too!
I think a contributing reason for the longevity of said way of life is included in the approach described in the post.

Nearing 25 yrs here. My approach is to switch off the drier myself before reloading (both stove and drier are in the basement). I tend to believe I have enough skills for that particular action.
 
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Nelson

Feeling the Heat
Dec 5, 2013
255
Mount Horeb, WI
More than likely you are burning creosote on top of the dome, behind the combustor. It will burn off, but depending upon amount, could take a while.
Sorry, just getting through the thread for the year! I needed to see this reply today. Been burning for a week or so - I clean my pipe through the bypass (at least up until where my pipe goes through wall) as well. I had been noticing a small amount of smoke coming out of my stack 2-3 hrs into my burn. Cat is plenty active during this time (1-2pm on the cat probe) and everything else would indicate that all is well. Now I'm thinking I may be seeing some creosote burning off of the dome as I am almost certain I'm not getting it all cleaned out. I will continue to monitor and see if it eventually goes away. Thanks BKVP!
 

Nelson

Feeling the Heat
Dec 5, 2013
255
Mount Horeb, WI
Steamers help, but generally don't add as much moisture to the air as your house really needs. You'd do better just running a humidifier, no matter which stove you operate. I have three of these going in my house, all winter:

I agree with this. That said, I would measure your indoor humidity first to determine if humidification is actually needed. I think some people just assume they need it when some actually don't. I was in this camp until I started measuring and realized my indoor humidity readings were within the range of normal for my climate - only dipping below during very cold weather. In that case, hanging laundry or not running the bath fan during showers tends to help just enough. If not properly maintained, I think it's been shown that humidifiers can contribute negatively to indoor air quality.
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
17,631
Philadelphia
I agree with this. That said, I would measure your indoor humidity first to determine if humidification is actually needed. I think some people just assume they need it when some actually don't. I was in this camp until I started measuring and realized my indoor humidity readings were within the range of normal for my climate - only dipping below during very cold weather. In that case, hanging laundry or not running the bath fan during showers tends to help just enough. If not properly maintained, I think it's been shown that humidifiers can contribute negatively to indoor air quality.
Good point. I suspect those not running outside air kits on their stoves are always going to be very dry, mine would hover around 19% - 23% RH, but those with tighter or smaller houses may find that cooking and general occupancy add enough moisture to the air to keep it in a reasonable range.
 
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DonTee

Minister of Fire
Dec 1, 2021
663
Upstate NY
My humidity is 30% inside right now, but is in the mid 20’s during the winter. The lowest it got last winter was 19%.

My dad uses a pot of water on his woodstove and maintains around 50% humidity in his house.

Re the wife: I take the approach mentioned above. I’ll turn off the dryer myself before I load the stove. I’ve only been married 15 years, but so far it’s been pretty smooth sailing.
 
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kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
6,705
07462
It gets pretty dry when arctic blasts come through during the winter, I have a separate sunbeam humidifier that I’ll run during those times, works like a charm with distilled water, since my well water has some minerals
 
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Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
17,631
Philadelphia
It gets pretty dry when arctic blasts come through during the winter, I have a separate sunbeam humidifier that I’ll run during those times, works like a charm with distilled water, since my well water has some minerals
This is why we went with an evaporative type (over warm mist, cool mist, or the ubiquitous ultrasonic). In an evaporative type, all minerals stay in the wick, not blown all over your house. You do need to change the wick every 1 - 4 weeks, depending on just how "hard" your water is, but knock-off brand wicks are cheap on Amazon. I'm pouring about 5 gallons per day into our humidifiers, no way I'd want to be carting 35 gallons of distilled water home from the store every week!
 
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Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
17,631
Philadelphia
What do you guys consider a comfortable inside humidity level? Those who are running humidifiers.
40 - 60% is the generally-quoted range. I run 50% in most weather, unless the windows start to frost up, and then I I'll back down to 45% or even 40%.
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
17,631
Philadelphia
I know 20 hours isn’t that good for a Princess, but I’m still a cat noob ;)
20h is very good for the Princess in my opinion
At what out side temperature? as long as it stays above freezing , IM getting 24.down at 0 I go 12 hr reloads
The age-old monthly debate, in each yearly BK thread. @Highbeam will tell you that burn time has absolutely nothing to do with outside temperature or your home's heating needs. A Princess should be able to go 30+ hours on a full load of any good wood, every day, any day, in any house, at any outside temperature.

Now @bholler will ask you if that's actually heating your house at that burn rate, which it very likely is not if it's cold outside, but the stove can still do it!

If you're unable to get 30 hours out of your Princess, it's time to check your draft (optimize to 0.05"WC steady-state high burn rate), or get some better firewood. BK cannot advise anyone to install a key damper, because of EPA regulations that preclude them from advising any deviation from the rig under which these stoves were tested, but their manual clearly states they (at least BK30's) are optimized for 0.05" water column, and should never be operated on anything above 0.06" water column.
 

Dieselhead

Minister of Fire
Feb 21, 2011
735
NE
We are generally in the 40-45% range, in the winter, which has been comfortable for us. Depending on weather conditions, it might go a little above or below that at times.
Less than 30 and we start to zap the poor dog every time we go to pet him.