Anyone tried drying wood on black asphalt?

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ilovedougfir

New Member
Aug 1, 2021
5
Monroe WA
I just came into about 1/2 cord of mix Cedar/Maple. I split it pretty fine and laid it out on my asphalt driveway. Any chance this will be dry enough to burn this winter (Nov-ish)?

I dont really have storage to keep it another year, so hoping I can get it down below 20%.

Thoughts?

pics.PNG
 

clancey

Minister of Fire
Feb 26, 2021
1,398
Colorado
Sounds like a good idea to me but in your area I do not believe that you get a lot of sun but I could be wrong here for I do not know much about your beautiful state--maybe you get wind or something...Sounds good to me..I do not know if you could speed up the wood drying and they have portable kilns out there that store wood and dry them...Just another idea here..clancey
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
1,535
Eastern Long Island NY
You'd have to take it away with any rain as the rain won't dry from between the wood and the asphalt. Many, many time moving the wood....
I know from having a pile on my driveway for a while. Pieces touching the asphalt remained soaked (dripping).

Make a single row stack (2*4 on blocks) in the sun (possibly at the edge of the hot asphalt?).
 

hickoryhoarder

Minister of Fire
Apr 5, 2013
645
Indiana
I stack all of my wood on an asphalt driveway (much lower volume than the rest of you, and a big driveway). And spread out pieces that need help. It's all on top of pressure treated 4x4s. The spread out stuff dries very fast.

In November I bring the pieces I'll burn the next three weeks and lean them individually against the stone siding in the sun, under the soffit. That works well too. I split kindling in December and cross stack it in the sun under the soffit. That's good for faster seasoning. I put it in the driveway stacks in March, and it's ready next November.
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
1,535
Eastern Long Island NY
I stack all of my wood on an asphalt driveway (much lower volume than the rest of you, and a big driveway). And spread out pieces that need help. It's all on top of pressure treated 4x4s. The spread out stuff dries very fast.

In November I bring the pieces I'll burn the next three weeks and lean them individually against the stone siding in the sun, under the soffit. That works well too. I split kindling in December and cross stack it in the sun under the soffit. That's good for faster seasoning. I put it in the driveway stacks in March, and it's ready next November.

Yes, the crucial point being not on the asphalt itself as in the pic. But on 2*4s. Either on blocks or not - I found moisture creeping up through stringers that were directly on the asphalt so I used blocks under the 2*4s
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,273
NE PA
Since covering the black asphalt creates reflection instead of absorption, I would lay parallel stringers in the center of the black area and cross stack with air space around each piece. Top cover with anything rigid that will overhang as much as possible. That way the hot air created by heat absorbed and reflected from the asphalt around it moves through it as much as possible.
 

Simonkenton

Minister of Fire
Feb 27, 2014
1,974
Marshall NC
That's a good idea. Never heard of it, on the other hand I have a dirt driveway. Seems like it would dry if you made space where the sun was hitting the asphalt in between firewood sticks.
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
1,535
Eastern Long Island NY
It won't if it touches the asphalt (or ground). I've had wood on asphalt in the sun. Where it touches it will remain wet.
 

Bad LP

Minister of Fire
Nov 28, 2014
1,720
Northern Maine
Wood does not completely dry without full air circulation. If it’s touching the ground it stays wet.
 

EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
1,204
SE North Carolina
So… the driveway may give you more solar collection area but the sun isn’t hotter because it’s on asphalt. Once it’s all covered with wood the black absorber now isn’t doing anything. Using the driveway as an absorber /collector for a solar kiln may improve drying. In the end for the quantity you need to heat full time unless you have lots of stave and time, You might be ahead to to just get a pallet of compressed saw dust bricks. And stack all of it for the next winter or two. Burning wet wood sucks. Takes all the fun out of it.
 

Woodsplitter67

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2017
1,959
Woolwich nj
I just came into about 1/2 cord of mix Cedar/Maple. I split it pretty fine and laid it out on my asphalt driveway. Any chance this will be dry enough to burn this winter (Nov-ish)?

I dont really have storage to keep it another year, so hoping I can get it down below 20%.

Thoughts?

View attachment 280591
stack the wood... the asphalt under the wood is not heating, rain will wipe away and gain your getting.. you could do a quick kiln to get it down, do it tomorrow with clear plastic it may be able to burn if you get on it
 

ilovedougfir

New Member
Aug 1, 2021
5
Monroe WA
Thanks for all the insights! @Clancy Western WA (Seattle area) used to have pretty mild summers, but of late it has been HOT, SUNNY, and not much rain. Everything everyone says here makes sense. I am going to keep running my experiment just to see what happens. Just 1/2 a cord. Hard to justify going to too much work for that. I'll come back here after I pull the wood in for the rainy season and update what moisture reading I got to.

Side note: One small adjustment I did make based on feedback here was I spaced the wood out a little so more of the asphalt was showing between logs. Not a ton of space, but hopefully enough to suck in some heat.
 

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Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
19,150
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
We've always had very nice summers in WA but we had some record hot days this year. Yes, it is dependably sunny for most of the summer here. Pretty dry compared to you inland folks and very comfortable. Don't tell anyone though, we're trying to keep them out! Oh and our heating season starts next month for 9 months. During that 9 month stretch it is grey, dark, drizzly, muddy, and pretty awful.
 

Woodsplitter67

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2017
1,959
Woolwich nj
We've always had very nice summers in WA but we had some record hot days this year. Yes, it is dependably sunny for most of the summer here. Pretty dry compared to you inland folks and very comfortable. Don't tell anyone though, we're trying to keep them out! Oh and our heating season starts next month for 9 months. During that 9 month stretch it is grey, dark, drizzly, muddy, and pretty awful.

We usually start the 2nd week in October. So we have like 7 weeks before fire time.. trust me.. I cant wait..
 

ilovedougfir

New Member
Aug 1, 2021
5
Monroe WA
Soooo..... the conclusion is.... after 2 months of letting the wood sit on the asphalt (and making my best effort to cover with a tarp when it rained) I threw in the towel on this experiment. The wood hardly dried. I started in the 60% range and only dropped about 10%. I feel like I get better results in my run of the mill wood rack.

Anyway thanks for all the insights and suggestions.
 
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stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
1,535
Eastern Long Island NY
Do you have data for the same wood load but stacked on your racks?

10% in two months is not crazy imo for wood that is that fresh/green in summer. It could be that it did as well as on your racks...