Attempting to Install a Kodiak Insert

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Dec 7, 2021
3
Kansas City, MO
Had a chimney company out when I bought the house I live in and they gave me a $18,000 repair cost for my basement fireplace. I've decided to put in a liner and wood burning insert instead. Working on installing a Kodiak wood burning insert in this fireplace. It is a super tight fit.
20211207_183259.jpg

I have already pushed/pulled a UL liner (8" with insulating wrap and another layer). I am working on cutting out my damper.
20211207_183325.jpg

The existing firebrick has finished collapsing in the back.
20211207_183312.jpg

And seeing what I'm seeing, what I thought would be a straight forward (if difficult) project is getting out of hand.

Is there any world where a damper is providing support the chimney? I assume not, and I can complete cutting it out.

Can I remove the existing firebrick in the chimney, or does it need to be replaced as well?
 
Last edited by a moderator:

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
92,798
South Puget Sound, WA
This would have been easier and less expensive with a modern insert, not to mention a lot less wood consumed in the future.
What did the chimney company find? $18, 000 sounds like a total rebuild.
 
Dec 7, 2021
3
Kansas City, MO
This insert cost me ~$200, I figure I would need to pay for the liner regardless. Where can I find a modern insert, buying new the only real option?

They wanted to redo two fireplace, and remove/replace the tile up both fireplaces, and a third where my utilities run to.

Do inserts that have firebrick on the inside also need firebrick in the fireplace where they are being installed?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
92,798
South Puget Sound, WA
A modern insert will take a less expensive 6" liner. In some places we've seen people pick up a good used EPA insert, but at this time of year buying used is hard. Heck, even new stoves are hard to get right now.

Most new inserts do have firebrick inside, but not all. Some use different methods to keep a high temp in the firebox and protect the sides. I think all inserts need at least 8" masonry surrounding them. It doesn't have to be firebrick. bholler would better at providing specifics, particularly to code and what is supporting the chimney.
 
Dec 7, 2021
3
Kansas City, MO
A modern insert will take a less expensive 6" liner. In some places we've seen people pick up a good used EPA insert, but at this time of year buying used is hard. Heck, even new stoves are hard to get right now.

Most new inserts do have firebrick inside, but not all. Some use different methods to keep a high temp in the firebox and protect the sides. I think all inserts need at least 8" masonry surrounding them. It doesn't have to be firebrick. bholler would better at providing specifics, particularly to code and what is supporting the chimney.

In that case I will charge ahead with what I have. This one luckily does have firebrick on the inside (which I am also replacing and have on hand).

Luckily I have 8" clearance pretty easily, I may even redo the brick in the back of the fireplace, but the sides both have over 12". I was worried I had to keep everything exactly in place.

Thank you very much for the information!
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,177
central pa
In that case I will charge ahead with what I have. This one luckily does have firebrick on the inside (which I am also replacing and have on hand).

Luckily I have 8" clearance pretty easily, I may even redo the brick in the back of the fireplace, but the sides both have over 12". I was worried I had to keep everything exactly in place.

Thank you very much for the information!
8" of solid masonry is required if the inside wall is firebrick. 10" if it isn't firebrick.