Basement installation: existing stovepipe with 90° to chimney

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metaphile

New Member
Feb 2, 2022
3
Andes, NY
Hi folks,

New member here. I'm very grateful for all the great information on this forum.

I have a question about installing a wood stove in a basement that has an existing stovepipe that connects to a flue. I understand that a stainless steel liner is required inside the flue and that it should be connected to the wood burner itself, but the scenario I have seems a bit challenging.

This basement has an existing 6" diameter circular stovepipe that passes through the stone hearth to a flue (it's a dual flue chimney with one flue attached to the fireplace on the ground floor and the other attached to this stovepipe in the basement; not sure the interior diameter of the flue but I think it's probably 8" square). My question is: would it be possible, perhaps with a press-fit 90° adapter at the bottom of the stainless steel liner, to use this existing set up to run a steel pipe from a wood burner through the circular pipe and all the way up through the flue?

I have read other posts on similar topics and I understand that the stainless steel liner itself is likely too rigid to make the 90° bend all the way through.

I imagine I could instead do a through-the-wall installation with a dedicated insulated stovepipe mounted to the exterior of the house, but I'd prefer to re-use the existing chimney if possible for reasons that should be obvious from the photos (will look nice, not much room on the exterior of the house to run a new stovepipe, etc.)

I've attached some photos and some measurements. Any opinions or expertise are greatly appreciated.

fireplace_and_stovepipe.png chimney-1.jpg stovepipe.jpg stovepipe-2.jpg
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,466
central pa
Hi folks,

New member here. I'm very grateful for all the great information on this forum.

I have a question about installing a wood stove in a basement that has an existing stovepipe that connects to a flue. I understand that a stainless steel liner is required inside the flue and that it should be connected to the wood burner itself, but the scenario I have seems a bit challenging.

This basement has an existing 6" diameter circular stovepipe that passes through the stone hearth to a flue (it's a dual flue chimney with one flue attached to the fireplace on the ground floor and the other attached to this stovepipe in the basement; not sure the interior diameter of the flue but I think it's probably 8" square). My question is: would it be possible, perhaps with a press-fit 90° adapter at the bottom of the stainless steel liner, to use this existing set up to run a steel pipe from a wood burner through the circular pipe and all the way up through the flue?

I have read other posts on similar topics and I understand that the stainless steel liner itself is likely too rigid to make the 90° bend all the way through.

I imagine I could instead do a through-the-wall installation with a dedicated insulated stovepipe mounted to the exterior of the house, but I'd prefer to re-use the existing chimney if possible for reasons that should be obvious from the photos (will look nice, not much room on the exterior of the house to run a new stovepipe, etc.)

I've attached some photos and some measurements. Any opinions or expertise are greatly appreciated.

View attachment 291399 View attachment 291400 View attachment 291401 View attachment 291402
The stainless liner will have half of a 2 part tee on the bottom. The other half will get slid into the existing crock.
 

metaphile

New Member
Feb 2, 2022
3
Andes, NY
Thank you for the response.

I was struggling to understand how the tee would go together without having to disassemble the masonry chimney but I think I'm understanding you now. A product like the one below would allow for both parts of the tee to be inserted separately (one down the flue, attached to the chimney liner and the "snout" piece through the existing 6" horizontal clay pipe) and then fitted together. I'm still not sure I understand how these come together to form an airtight seal but I am happy to hear there is a solution that should work for my purposes.

I plan to have a professional handle the installation but wanted to first validate that it was possible to do this sort of thing without going through the trouble of disassembling the masonry to any extent.

HS-Pro-Tee-Rem-Uncrimped-TO.jpg Screenshot from 2022-02-03 15-53-47.png
 

metaphile

New Member
Feb 2, 2022
3
Andes, NY
OK, I see now that this was a newbie question -- forgive me! I found a YouTube video that explains it quite well. From that I see that you cinch the snout down from the inside of it, attaching it to the Tee. Thank you for your help!