BK Princess vs. Regency Pro-series f3500

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Hogwildz

Minister of Fire
This is the response to wildhog upon which I based my reply. It's possible that you meant you could only get Oak dry in one year with the shrink wrap, but that's not how it read to me..
Woody, he likes his splits thin. My thinnest split is 5"-6", but most are between 6" & 8" with quite a few 8+ for over night. I'll stick to 3 years, knowing they are full optimal, and has worked for going on 13 seasons for me. If the posters splits at 1 yr are only 1/2 dry enough, it's a waste, and if he goes with the cat, it will clog the shitsky out of that cat in no time. Not to mention what will be caked on the stack. So like us, and the majority on here, 2 years soso, 3 years primo. Unless one wants to split a bunch of slim splits, or make some homemade kiln. Seems to me, it's much easier to just be 3 years ahead, and be done with any issues.
 

pjohnson

Burning Hunk
Oct 2, 2013
143
I’ll probably get lots of disagreement over this post but I have a Blaze King king model and my wood has been sub par this year, oak and maple measured 30 to 35 percent moisture 4 to 8 inch splits. I thought I’d have all kinds of problems burning this wood this year. I’m totally amazed it burns just fine in the blaze king. I haven’t noticed any difference in heat output, keep my thermostat the same as last year with super dry wood. I reload on a hot bed of coals and it lights right off. I was concerned with creosote but I’ve seen no difference in the chimney, I have easy access to roof so check it every week or so and run a brush thru it but there is no creosote, burning pretty clean. I think the only thing I’ve noticed is I have more coals then last year. Not a huge deal just open it up for a few hours at the end of burn and let then burn down. I had a couple tube stoves prior to the blaze king and they did not like wet wood at all. I’m totally amazed at how well it handles higher moisture wood, from my experience the blaze king is much more tolerant of high moisture wood then a tube stove.
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
16,530
Philadelphia
Woody, he likes his splits thin. My thinnest split is 5"-6", but most are between 6" & 8" with quite a few 8+ for over night. I'll stick to 3 years, knowing they are full optimal, and has worked for going on 13 seasons for me. If the posters splits at 1 yr are only 1/2 dry enough, it's a waste, and if he goes with the cat, it will clog the shitsky out of that cat in no time. Not to mention what will be caked on the stack. So like us, and the majority on here, 2 years soso, 3 years primo. Unless one wants to split a bunch of slim splits, or make some homemade kiln. Seems to me, it's much easier to just be 3 years ahead, and be done with any issues.

Hey Hogz, I get your point, but burning wet wood in a cat stove isn’t all the trouble you make it out to be. I did it for my first two years in a Jotul cat stove, and it wasn’t ideal, but I was able to make it work. No clogged cats, except the diesel foil cats that I melted and distorted. You just need to bake out the wood a lot longer before closing that bypass damper to engage the cat, and be especially careful of steam impingement on hot reloads by staying in bypass longer than the gauges would have you believe. If running a BK, this would also likely limit your ability to turn down to the lowest settings without stalling. Definitely a less pleasurable and productive burning experience, but it is doable, as I’ve done it.
 
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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,681
central pa
Woody, he likes his splits thin. My thinnest split is 5"-6", but most are between 6" & 8" with quite a few 8+ for over night. I'll stick to 3 years, knowing they are full optimal, and has worked for going on 13 seasons for me. If the posters splits at 1 yr are only 1/2 dry enough, it's a waste, and if he goes with the cat, it will clog the shitsky out of that cat in no time. Not to mention what will be caked on the stack. So like us, and the majority on here, 2 years soso, 3 years primo. Unless one wants to split a bunch of slim splits, or make some homemade kiln. Seems to me, it's much easier to just be 3 years ahead, and be done with any issues.
Ok many people simple don't have the room to be 3 years ahead. At my last house it simply was not an option. And my splits aren't super small. I would say an average of 3 to 6.

Building a kiln consisted of wrapping my stacks in plastic and cutting some slits in it. Hardly an extensive construction project.

I prefer setting my stove up with the proper draft so it can be controllable instead of relying on huge spilts to make it overnight.

Why not tell people how to test their wood and dry it faster rather than simply telling them it can't be done?
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,681
central pa
I’ll probably get lots of disagreement over this post but I have a Blaze King king model and my wood has been sub par this year, oak and maple measured 30 to 35 percent moisture 4 to 8 inch splits. I thought I’d have all kinds of problems burning this wood this year. I’m totally amazed it burns just fine in the blaze king. I haven’t noticed any difference in heat output, keep my thermostat the same as last year with super dry wood. I reload on a hot bed of coals and it lights right off. I was concerned with creosote but I’ve seen no difference in the chimney, I have easy access to roof so check it every week or so and run a brush thru it but there is no creosote, burning pretty clean. I think the only thing I’ve noticed is I have more coals then last year. Not a huge deal just open it up for a few hours at the end of burn and let then burn down. I had a couple tube stoves prior to the blaze king and they did not like wet wood at all. I’m totally amazed at how well it handles higher moisture wood, from my experience the blaze king is much more tolerant of high moisture wood then a tube stove.
Make sure to check your cat wet wood tends to crack up cats faster
 

Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
12,279
Southern IN
my wood has been sub par this year, oak and maple measured 30 to 35 percent moisture 4 to 8 inch splits...I reload on a hot bed of coals and it lights right off.
When you throw the wood on a hot coal bed, what do you see or hear if you open the door after ten or fifteen minutes? Do you hear hissing, or see water bubbling out the ends of the splits?
 
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pjohnson

Burning Hunk
Oct 2, 2013
143
I keep watching for any signs of water or hissing and I see none which kind of surprises me
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
93,751
South Puget Sound, WA
Advantage Regency:
1. Local dealer support.

Advantage BK:
1. More hearth.com forum member support.
2. hearth.com BKVP support.
3. Longer burn times, maybe more than double, when you don't need maximum heat.
4. A known entity, there are a lot more posts and reviews of BK on this forum and others, than Regency.

If it were me, I'd be coercing a local hearth store to visit this forum, and see the "BK hype". If there's no local dealer, maybe they'll become one!
Regency also has a more diverse product line and likely sells a lot more stoves. A lack of posts here probably means that Regency owners are not having many issues to report. BK is sending some tech support problems to Hearth.com which skews the metrics in a somewhat perverse way. One should keep in mind that we hear mostly from people with problems, not the vast numbers of happy people that like their stoves and do not need any support or are getting good support from their dealer, as it should be. Endless chatter is not a mark of a reliable, low maintenance stove.
 
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RIMatt

Member
Oct 30, 2018
91
RI
Ok many people simple don't have the room to be 3 years ahead. At my last house it simply was not an option. And my splits aren't super small. I would say an average of 3 to 6.

Building a kiln consisted of wrapping my stacks in plastic and cutting some slits in it. Hardly an extensive construction project.

I prefer setting my stove up with the proper draft so it can be controllable instead of relying on huge spilts to make it overnight.

Why not tell people how to test their wood and dry it faster rather than simply telling them it can't be done?

I am going to have to try a quick kiln like this when I get a break in the weather.
 

pjohnson

Burning Hunk
Oct 2, 2013
143
Maybe your moisture meter is lying to you?
I don’t think it’s lying too much, the wood was cut two summers ago but bucked and split this spring and summer. I keep a weeks supply in a rack near the stove took a piece and and split it, measured 35 to 37 felt slightly damp, I know it’s not As dry as should be. I was worried all fall I’d have problems with wet wood, it is used to heat a cabin so could shut it down for the winter not a life or death situation. I’ve been burning for almost 3 months now a few nights down to -20 and no issues. I do watch everything closely I’ve had wood stoves for over 45 years this blaze king has been working really good for my situation.
 
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BKVP

Minister of Fire
There have been a few studies that were forwarded to EPA, in which tolerance for wet wood in cat stoves was proven. TO BE VERY CLEAR, WET WOOD SHOULD NOT BE BURNED IN ANY WOOD STOVES AS ALL STUDIES SHOW HIGHER LEVELS OF PM, REGARDLESS OF TECHNOLOGY.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,681
central pa
There have been a few studies that were forwarded to EPA, in which tolerance for wet wood in cat stoves was proven. TO BE VERY CLEAR, WET WOOD SHOULD NOT BE BURNED IN ANY WOOD STOVES AS ALL STUDIES SHOW HIGHER LEVELS OF PM, REGARDLESS OF TECHNOLOGY.
I completely agree with you. I just like to point out here that there is no specific time that is needed or that garauntees dry wood. For newer burners there is no way to know other than testing with a moisture meter
 
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Grizzerbear

Minister of Fire
Feb 12, 2019
1,296
SW Missoura
I completely agree with you. I just like to point out here that there is no specific time that is needed or that garauntees dry wood. For newer burners there is no way to know other than testing with a moisture meter

I agree. Somone from texas and minnesota would have vastly different timetables. Their is a lot of variables to the drying process and moisture meters are great for helping you learn your average length of seasoning time for your desired mc for a given species.
 
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Hogwildz

Minister of Fire
Ok many people simple don't have the room to be 3 years ahead. At my last house it simply was not an option. And my splits aren't super small. I would say an average of 3 to 6.

Building a kiln consisted of wrapping my stacks in plastic and cutting some slits in it. Hardly an extensive construction project.

I prefer setting my stove up with the proper draft so it can be controllable instead of relying on huge spilts to make it overnight.

Why not tell people how to test their wood and dry it faster rather than simply telling them it can't be done?
Cause you're the only one claiming you get 6" splits of oak to fry in 1 year. If you don't have the room, then you do what you have to, I get that. You're the one stating how small you split them when this discussion first started years ago. You stated you split them small and stacked them tight for the same effect as large splits.
At 27' of liner, and an insert, I can't for a whole heck of a lot about the draft here, and I like large splits for less fiddling, and easier loading for me, and longer burn times. Not a must, as I can get overnight burns with 6" splits too, but larger splits give longer release of heat over longer time for this set up.

From reading over the past 13 years, the majority of oak burners have agreed over the years to 2 to 3 years for oak. And if one has the room, why not? If you don't then you do what you must.

As I and other have plenty of room for storing splits wood, we choose to be 3 years or more ahead. And it is wonderful.
To each their own, we all do what we must, or can.
 

Hogwildz

Minister of Fire
Hey Hogz, I get your point, but burning wet wood in a cat stove isn’t all the trouble you make it out to be. I did it for my first two years in a Jotul cat stove, and it wasn’t ideal, but I was able to make it work. No clogged cats, except the diesel foil cats that I melted and distorted. You just need to bake out the wood a lot longer before closing that bypass damper to engage the cat, and be especially careful of steam impingement on hot reloads by staying in bypass longer than the gauges would have you believe. If running a BK, this would also likely limit your ability to turn down to the lowest settings without stalling. Definitely a less pleasurable and productive burning experience, but it is doable, as I’ve done it.
I get it. I think we have all burned " less than optimal" wood. Usually the first year or so of getting into the wood burning world. I know I did. Yes it will burn, and it will bake, and it is a pita, and sadly, not put out the heat as good dry wood will. We have seen that complaint year in & year out. We've all done it, and while we made it work, it sucks. And knowing what we know now, we know the vast difference.
I cleaned my stack at least 2 or 3x I think the first year. That is when I took the 3 years for me, seriously. Whatever I have in the piles, at 3 years, is primo and ready to burn, regardless of size or species. It really is a great feeling knowing I won't have issues fighting to get some splits going, over the hump of boiling the moisture out, and huffing & puffing to keep it going.

In know I may seem harsh at times, much better than years ago, but the point is, I would rather get through to someone that with work, time & patience(and space if available)being 3+ years ahead gives a feeling of freedom, and one less thing to stress about in life. I'm all about simplifying my life.

Burn well and stay warm my burning brethren.
 
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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,681
central pa
Cause you're the only one claiming you get 6" splits of oak to fry in 1 year. If you don't have the room, then you do what you have to, I get that. You're the one stating how small you split them when this discussion first started years ago. You stated you split them small and stacked them tight for the same effect as large splits.
At 27' of liner, and an insert, I can't for a whole heck of a lot about the draft here, and I like large splits for less fiddling, and easier loading for me, and longer burn times. Not a must, as I can get overnight burns with 6" splits too, but larger splits give longer release of heat over longer time for this set up.

As I and other have plenty of room for storing splits wood, we choose to be 3 years or more ahead. And it is wonderful.
To each their own, we all do what we must, or can.
If that is how you prefer to do it that's fine. But don't go around telling people you need 3 years when that simply is not the case. 6" is the largest I split most are smaller than that.

And no i am not the only one who gets their wood dry in a year. Far from it.
 

Hogwildz

Minister of Fire
If that is how you prefer to do it that's fine. But don't go around telling people you need 3 years when that simply is not the case. 6" is the largest I split most are smaller than that.

And no i am not the only one who gets their wood dry in a year. Far from it.
I never said you were the only one. I did say however, the majority over the years has advised 2-3 years. If you have never let it sit for 3 years, you would not know. 3 years vs 1 year is a big difference.
And I'll offer whatever words I want, don't tell me what to say and not to say!
At least I am not telling people 1 yr is all that is needed, when 3 years is much, much better burning wood.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,681
central pa
I never said you were the only one. I did say however, the majority over the years has advised 2-3 years. If you have never let it sit for 3 years, you would not know. 3 years vs 1 year is a big difference.
And I'll offer whatever words I want, don't tell me what to say and not to say!
At least I am not telling people 1 yr is all that is needed, when 3 years is much, much better burning wood.
What difference does the amount of time make if I get it to the same moisture content? And yes I have had 3 year old wood. Last year my 2 year old covered wood went up in moisture content because of the ammout of rain and humidity we had. That was the reason I went with a kiln. Time doesn't mean a damn thing. Moisture content does.
 
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Jan Pijpelink

Minister of Fire
Jan 2, 2015
1,972
South Jersey
What difference does the amount of time make if I get it to the same moisture content? And yes I have had 3 year old wood. Last year my 2 year old covered wood went up in moisture content because of the ammout of rain and humidity we had. That was the reason I went with a kiln. Time doesn't mean a damn thing. Moisture content does.
Here in South Jersey, our summers are very humid, not too much rain, but a high humidity. We have only 1/3 acre property, so we cannot store 6 years of wood. That is why I started experimenting with a kiln. My largest split is about 6 inch. I like it so far, and it works.
 
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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,681
central pa
Here in South Jersey, our summers are very humid, not too much rain, but a high humidity. We have only 1/3 acre property, so we cannot store 6 years of wood. That is why I started experimenting with a kiln. My largest split is about 6 inch. I like it so far, and it works.
Good glad to hear I am not the only one.
 
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Hogwildz

Minister of Fire
What difference does the amount of time make if I get it to the same moisture content? And yes I have had 3 year old wood. Last year my 2 year old covered wood went up in moisture content because of the ammout of rain and humidity we had. That was the reason I went with a kiln. Time doesn't mean a damn thing. Moisture content does.
Time is what it takes for the internal moisture to lower. External moisture from rain, humidity etc, does not effect the same as a fresh cut tree, or fresh split wood. Do as you wish, and I will do as I do. I will also advise as I see fit, as you will also.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,681
central pa
Time is what it takes for the internal moisture to lower. External moisture from rain, humidity etc, does not effect the same as a fresh cut tree. Do as you wish, and I will do as I do. I will also advise as I see fit, as you will also.
Do you really think I don't split my wood open to check internal moisture? And yes constant rain and humidity will effect internal moisture content without question.
 
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Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
12,279
Southern IN
Do you really think I don't split my wood open to check internal moisture?
I'm curious, what readings are you getting on this one-year "dry" wood? I like mine about 18%, that's when it burns noticeably better for me..faster starts and a hotter cat. I might get Red Oak that dry in two years, with 4" splits. Maybe what I wouldn't consider dry, you would.