Can a layer of common red brick be used for hearth pad?

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Sprinter

Minister of Fire
Jul 1, 2012
2,984
SW Washington
My sisters and I just sold our dad's old house and it is being demolished for a new house on the lot. It has a full brick chimney and also a brick facade. I wonder if it would be possible to take some of the brick from the old place and use it for a stove pad here. I haven't really given it much thought but maybe you guys could tell me if it's even feasible as far as R value and such. I guess the carpet would be cut out and the brick laid on the sub floor. Just a thought. It would be as much for sentimental value than anything.

Well, I just looked up the r value of common brick and apparently it's only .8 per 4" side, so it would take 8" high to make r1.5. Well, that's doable I guess and a raised hearth may be convenient anyway. I'll go ahead and post this in can anyone has some ideas.
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
15,715
Philadelphia
Some stoves require only ember protection, not R1.5, so that's a factor to consider.

I wonder how they named R0.8 for brick. Were they assuming clay or concrete brick? While one could have just assumed clay 40 years ago, one is as common as the other today.
 

fossil

Accidental Moderator
Sep 30, 2007
10,568
Bend, OR
I'm a big fan of raised hearths. Not so much bending over. My shop and my house...both pics are somewhat dated, especially the shop, but the stoves/hearths are the same as shown. The space inside the brick shell of each hearth is filled with concrete block, brick scraps & rubble, and mortar. Rick

shopstove.jpg house2.jpg
 
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Prof

Feeling the Heat
Oct 18, 2011
491
Western PA
As illustrated above, brick is great for a hearth. One thing I would double check is the flooring support (assuming there is a basement). When you start piling up bricks and put 500 lbs of stove on top things can get heavy quick. Probably not a big deal, but worth checking into IMO.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
84,253
South Puget Sound, WA
The hearth R value depends on the stove. You don't need brick to make up all of the insulation. Cement board or micore can do some of the work too. Just put it on the bottom layer.
 

Sprinter

Minister of Fire
Jul 1, 2012
2,984
SW Washington
I wonder how they named R0.8 for brick. Were they assuming clay or concrete brick? While one could have just assumed clay 40 years ago, one is as common as the other today.
What I found was for common red brick. It seems like that term is a defined type, as the kind we normally think of. I'd have to confirm that .8 brick is what I have for sure.
This link is a handy resource for material R values: http://www.allwallsystem.com/design/RValueTable.html

Fossil: Really nice looking hearths. I like the idea of using block under the brick shell. Looks like block contributes enough to R value that only one 4" layer of brick may be necessary. I may sketch something up patterned after what you did. Just how high are those two hearths?

Prof: Yeah, weight is definitely a concern. I would figure that all out first for sure.

The hearth R value depends on the stove. You don't need brick to make up all of the insulation. Cement board or micore can do some of the work too. Just put it on the bottom layer.
Good idea, thanks.

Biggest problem is that I am no mason and I'm not sure I want to tackle something like this given the critical nature of the thing, not to mention how it may look!;hm Maybe I can find someone to do it. Probably not a big job for someone who knows what they're doing.
 

woodchip

Minister of Fire
Dec 6, 2010
1,389
Broadstone England
We have a brick hearth here, I'm a brick fan, having worked at a brickmaking company 10 years ago.........

Almost everything here was built out of brick 10 years ago..........;)
 

SIERRADMAX

Feeling the Heat
Jan 13, 2011
300
RI
As mentioned above, some stoves only require ember protection. However, some stoves also sell a bottom heat shield but still require a non-combustible hearth such as a layer of brick.
 
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Sprinter

Minister of Fire
Jul 1, 2012
2,984
SW Washington
We have a brick hearth here, I'm a brick fan, having worked at a brickmaking company 10 years ago.........

Almost everything here was built out of brick 10 years ago..........;)
Pics, we need pics.
 

eclecticcottage

Minister of Fire
Dec 7, 2011
1,803
WNY
We used lake stones for our hearth pad. We framed it, layed a backer board (for the life of me I can't think of which one it was for some reason...Hardiboard? Durarock? one of those two). Our stove doesn't have an r-value requirement for the hearth pad..

I did the stone work. I'm no mason (although my grandpa was, I never saw him lay a brick). It really wasn't that bad once I got started, although it did take about 10 hours to grout. We're going to do our kitchen floor in brick, I guess I'll see if that's easier or harder.
 

Sprinter

Minister of Fire
Jul 1, 2012
2,984
SW Washington
We used lake stones for our hearth pad. We framed it, layed a backer board (for the life of me I can't think of which one it was for some reason...Hardiboard? Durarock? one of those two). Our stove doesn't have an r-value requirement for the hearth pad..

I did the stone work. I'm no mason (although my grandpa was, I never saw him lay a brick). It really wasn't that bad once I got started, although it did take about 10 hours to grout. We're going to do our kitchen floor in brick, I guess I'll see if that's easier or harder.
I saw that your main stove is a Lopi 1750 and looked up the specs. I didn't realize that it had no r value requirement on the floor; only for spark protection. With a 4-1/2" rear clearance and minimal floor protection, I'm liking this stove more and more even though it's 24". Still thinking about raising it, for easier reach and better view of the fire. I need to minimize the floor space it takes up, so maybe a raised platform just a little deeper than the stove itself and a thin spark layer 16" in front of it that is not a trip hazard. Just thinking.
 

eclecticcottage

Minister of Fire
Dec 7, 2011
1,803
WNY
Our hearth pad is only about 4 1/2" high. You get a good view of the fire at that height. It's a nice stove. I'm glad we went with the Republic over the Endeavor.

Here:



 

Sprinter

Minister of Fire
Jul 1, 2012
2,984
SW Washington
Nice looking setup. I like that idea. How many runners (joists or whatever) did you put in the frame and how far apart to support the cement board? I imagine that stuff is kind of brittle used horizontally that way.
I'm glad we went with the Republic over the Endeavor.
Any reason other than cost? They seem like the same stove except for trim and stuff on the Endeavor. I need to look at those more closely and find a dealer here.
 

eclecticcottage

Minister of Fire
Dec 7, 2011
1,803
WNY
We've got 2x4's 16" on center below it in the frame running n/s.

Cost was the original factor, but additionally, the Republic doesn't have the step top that the Endeavor does and I think it looks better without it in our decor. Also, the stove and hearth pad sit between two sliding doors, so the bypass control would have looked like it was "sticking out" on the right side. I don't think the bypass is needed, but then again, I've never had a stove with one to compare to (this is our first wood stove).

We had some frustrations with the door glass getting dirty no matter what by the handle. I'm not sure if it's our stove or what. We had the problem even when burning staight ecobricks so it wasn't exclusively fuel. The dealer (who SUCKS btw) did replace the gasket on the door, but it didn't help. The handle also does loosen over time and needs retightened.

HOWEVER, aside from possibly the Blaze King Scirrocco (sp) I don't think there's another stove I'd rather have, all things considered. I'd love the burn time of a BK, which is the only reason I said that-I'd be annoyed with the left side mounted door pretty quick but I'd probably get over it if I had a 20 or so hour burn time! Of course, that stove wasn't on the market when we bought the Republic and I do not like the looks of any of their other stoves at all.
 

Sprinter

Minister of Fire
Jul 1, 2012
2,984
SW Washington
We've got 2x4's 16" on center below it in the frame running n/s.

Cost was the original factor, but additionally, the Republic doesn't have the step top that the Endeavor does and I think it looks better without it in our decor. Also, the stove and hearth pad sit between two sliding doors, so the bypass control would have looked like it was "sticking out" on the right side. I don't think the bypass is needed, but then again, I've never had a stove with one to compare to (this is our first wood stove).

We had some frustrations with the door glass getting dirty no matter what by the handle. I'm not sure if it's our stove or what. We had the problem even when burning staight ecobricks so it wasn't exclusively fuel. The dealer (who SUCKS btw) did replace the gasket on the door, but it didn't help. The handle also does loosen over time and needs retightened.

HOWEVER, aside from possibly the Blaze King Scirrocco (sp) I don't think there's another stove I'd rather have, all things considered. I'd love the burn time of a BK, which is the only reason I said that-I'd be annoyed with the left side mounted door pretty quick but I'd probably get over it if I had a 20 or so hour burn time! Of course, that stove wasn't on the market when we bought the Republic and I do not like the looks of any of their other stoves at all.
The Blaze King dealer that I talked to (he has other lines also) told me he thinks the BK is ugly too. I hadn't even asked him about them. Does anyone like their looks? BTW, he also told me that the BK window gets black quickly. Not sure which model it was. I've decided against cat's anyway for our situation and I don't mind loading up every 4 or 5 hours.
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
15,715
Philadelphia
Does anyone like their looks?
Hey... someone needs to make stoves for people with bad taste, too! ;lol

BKVP is promising us they have a new cast iron stove hitting the market soon, and that it will be less offensive looking than their current line-up.
 

Sprinter

Minister of Fire
Jul 1, 2012
2,984
SW Washington
Hey... someone needs to make stoves for people with bad taste, too! ;lol

BKVP is promising us they have a new cast iron stove hitting the market soon, and that it will be less offensive looking than their current line-up.
I wonder if their new slogan will be "Less Offensive Looking!" That should look good in the new brochure!
 

BrotherBart

Modestorator
Staff member
Personally I don't think the BK stoves look bad.
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
15,715
Philadelphia
Personally I don't think the BK stoves look bad.
Well... who's to say what's good or bad? They're just not my preference. If we could get the looks of a Jotul or a Lopi with the performance of a BK, I'd be one happy stove owner.
 

eclecticcottage

Minister of Fire
Dec 7, 2011
1,803
WNY
I think BKs blacken the glass when run low and slow, but a BK owner can jump in on that one. Although it doesn't seem like it matters if you don't want a cat.

I wish we would have had a BK dealer here, although I doubt it would have made a difference since the one stove I would have wanted wasn't on the market yet...

I like the Sirocco (it looks rather like the Republic) and the Chinook would be nice in a more contemporary decor. Otherwise...not my style.

You wouldn't likely need to load any where near that often with the Republic. We load when we leave (full load) and reload (partial quick reheat load) about 10 hours later...then again about 4 hours (full load) later before bed. Sometimes I'll reload mid-night *IF* it's really cold. It also depends on fuel of course.

Sirocco

 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
84,253
South Puget Sound, WA
I'm a big fan of raised hearths. Not so much bending over. My shop and my house...both pics are somewhat dated, especially the shop, but the stoves/hearths are the same as shown. The space inside the brick shell of each hearth is filled with concrete block, brick scraps & rubble, and mortar. Rick

View attachment 70823 View attachment 70821
Looking good. I like the idea of just filling the open space with scrap brick and cement or other non-combustibles. Clever!
 
The Blaze King dealer that I talked to (he other lines also) told me he thinks the BK is ugly too. I hadn't even asked him about them. Does anyone like their looks? BTW, he also told me that the BK window gets black quickly. Not sure which model it was. I've decided against cat's anyway for our situation and I don't mind loading up every 4 or 5 hours.
LOL! These are fighting words to the Blaze King fan club. I don't love their looks either, but I'd love to try one out with those burn times. I won't be shelling out $3,000+ anytime soon. For now, I'll just buy some more SuperCedars and have a relight more often.
 
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