Can anyone identify our woodburner, also advice on sealing joints

herby Posted By herby, Feb 28, 2019 at 6:02 PM

  1. herby

    herby
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    Feb 28, 2019
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    Hi,
    This woodburner was in our garden when we moved in about 3 years ago, it had approx 1/2 inch thick of rust covering it.
    I've restored it but am now trying to identify it, I've replaced the fire bricks, glass, & I've made the door latch, vent covers, legs & internal heat shield plate. I had it checked & installed by a professional to get the fire safety certificate.
    when restoring it, the sides slotted into the recessed ridge around the underside of the lid, but when I smoke checked it had some very minor leaks which I sealed with a (very high temperature ) cement sealant, can anyone suggest a better way of sealing the lid joints as the cement has started to degrade.
    Thanks, Herby
     

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  2. bholler

    bholler
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    Jan 14, 2014
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    All of the joints should have been cemented with a high quality furnace cement while assembling it.
     
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  3. herby

    herby
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    Feb 28, 2019
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    Thanks, it was sealed with a furnace cement sealant rated to 1200c but this seems to be degrading along the seam beneath the top plate (lid), could you recommend an alternative ?
     
  4. bholler

    bholler
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    Is the top bolted down or just gravity? If it is bolted down pull it off clean up the old cement fill the joint and bolt it back down. If it just sits there it needs to be gasketed
     
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  5. redmanlcs

    redmanlcs
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    Nov 20, 2017
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    A small leak in a stove is not that big of a deal. I wouldn't worry about it, coming from a vogelzang boxwood user, just my .02
     
  6. herby

    herby
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    Feb 28, 2019
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    thanks, it is bolted, can you recommend a furnace cement as maybe the one I used wasn't up to the job ?
     
  7. ct01r

    ct01r
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    Nov 10, 2018
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    I've used Rutland furnace cement on 3 separate stoves that I've refinished, and it seems to work well. Rated up to 2000 degrees; used it to seal the seams between the metal pieces as I reassembled the stoves. Curt
     
  8. Metalmantma

    Metalmantma
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    Mar 6, 2019
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    I have a semi leaky Jotul in the basement that I used Rutland cement on and it holds very well for a few yrs. On that note I have had or still have 5 other woodstoves and I used Rutland on them too. It's easy and inexpensive.
     
  9. bholler

    bholler
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    Are you guys putting the cement in the joints before Assemblies the stove? If so I should last at a minimum 10 years.
     
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  10. ct01r

    ct01r
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    Nov 10, 2018
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    Yes, I put it on the bottom piece, the put the upper piece on and when it's tightened, the cement oozes out and gets cleaned up. Just curious (and not very eloquent!) where'd you get the 10 year figure? I thought it would be considered permant and would last over 25 years or so (barring moving/dropping, etc.) Curt
     
  11. bholler

    bholler
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    Because that is the shortest I have gotten out of rebuilding an old stove. 15 to 20 is more typical. 25 is pretty long.
     
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  12. ct01r

    ct01r
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  13. herby

    herby
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    Feb 28, 2019
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    Thanks for all the info', i'll get some rutland, might as well dismantle the wood burner, clean all joints & use the good stuff to seal all joints, think i'll wait for some sunny weather tho.
    Can anyone identify the woodburner ?
     
  14. Metalmantma

    Metalmantma
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    Mar 6, 2019
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    On the woodstoves I put back together from pieces the Rutland cement has held so far (dating back to 2011). On my Jotul I never took it apart to cement it, I cemented in place. All was good for 3 or 4 yrs, then we moved and I had pieces fall off and it leaked again.I re cemented with Rutland again and all has been well (3 yrs so far). I'm not sure if maybe I did something wrong when I applied it or maybe all the movement from moving to a new house might have cracked and broke pieces of the cement. Don't know if this helps or not but I burn 8 to 10 cord a year in that stove and for the price of Rutland cement it is very worth using.
     

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