Compressed Sawdust Bricks in a Cat Stove?

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ridemgis

Feeling the Heat
Ok, maybe a stupid question, is anyone burning Envi or other compressed sawdust bricks in a cat stove? For what it's worth, I burn them regularly in my Hearthstone without over firing or getting out of control.
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
6,285
Long Island NY
You can burn such bricks in a cat stove, as long as there are no additives. I.e. just pure wood/shavings/dust.
That seems to be the case with Envi bricks.
In fact, some here advocate to buy a pallet of such bricks when buying a stove, because most people don't ahve enough dry wood stacked up when the stove is installed.

If you can control it well, it's not an issue. For a first time user of the bricks, I'd put in 3 or so, keep an eye on the stove to avoid it taking off, and get a feel for it. (Similar for e.g. burning untreated 2x4 cut offs.)
 
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ratsrepus

Minister of Fire
Jan 5, 2018
778
Howell, Mi
I buy a pallet of gren energy blocks every year. i love them. no problems in either of my blaze kings
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
96,422
South Puget Sound, WA
Ok, maybe a stupid question, is anyone burning Envi or other compressed sawdust bricks in a cat stove? For what it's worth, I burn them regularly in my Hearthstone without over firing or getting out of control.
No problem as long as they are the highly compressed variety (NIELs, Homefires, Bio Bricks, Envi Bricks, etc.) and not the flakey cheapos.
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
96,422
South Puget Sound, WA
Stock up early. I suspect the demand will be high this year.
 

ridemgis

Feeling the Heat
You can burn such bricks in a cat stove, as long as there are no additives. I.e. just pure wood/shavings/dust.
That seems to be the case with Envi bricks.
In fact, some here advocate to buy a pallet of such bricks when buying a stove, because most people don't ahve enough dry wood stacked up when the stove is installed.

If you can control it well, it's not an issue. For a first time user of the bricks, I'd put in 3 or so, keep an eye on the stove to avoid it taking off, and get a feel for it. (Similar for e.g. burning untreated 2x4 cut

Stock up early. I suspect the demand will be high this year.
Thanks Begreen. I have three tons of Envi 8s in the basement!
 

BKVP

Minister of Fire
No problem as long as they are the highly compressed variety (NIELs, Homefires, Bio Bricks, Envi Bricks, etc.) and not the flakey cheapos.
What is also paramount, is the source of raw materials. One brand tested from the PNW admitted their feedstock was often drift wood. The saline count was not favorable to any wood stove, let alone a catalytic wood stove. The good thing about NIEL's, they are not anywhere near the ocean! We have done very extensive, proprietary analysis of various (but not all) manufactured fuels. These lab studies have shown "most are organic" but some contained melamine and other materials that should not be burned in any stove.

Just read the label or call the company and ask about their source or feedstock to get an accurate answer. You will find they are generally very happy to speak with customers.

BKVP
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
96,422
South Puget Sound, WA
That's a bummer. It would be good to identify those offenders. Some of the cheapo sawdust logs look like they were packed floor sweepings. Typically they expand badly on heating and leave a lot of ash. Homefires and NIELs are denser than water and stay solid down to the end of their burn.
 

BKVP

Minister of Fire
That's a bummer. It would be good to identify those offenders. Some of the cheapo sawdust logs look like they were packed floor sweepings. Typically they expand badly on heating and leave a lot of ash. Homefires and NIELs are denser than water and stay solid down to the end of their burn.
Of course I can't do that, But you can call them. When we did our sampling, we called and asked for samples. (I should have had a disclaimer that said.. "If you supply us a sample, the results may be made public". Anyway, when the results came back, we called each company and said, "where do you get your feedstock?" That is when we received a response, "pallets, yes. Drift wood, yes. Melamine or OSB, yes." Just because a log looks "denser", that does not assure you of their ingredients.

Interesting isn't it...EPA regulates the fuel that goes into cars, but there are ZERO EPA regulations pertaining to manufactured solid fuels.