Doghouse block

Ctwoodtick

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Jun 5, 2015
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my Jotul Rockland runs hot. It’s not the draft, its it’s only 13 ft from stove top to liner exit. I have tried blocking the 3 holes that make up the doghouse air in the inside if bottom of stove with screws, but the screws tend to fall out. Has anyone had success with blocking this air from the inside?
 

begreen

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How is the temp being measured? The creosote buildup at the top of the firebox that was posted in the cleaning thread made it look like the insert was running too cool.
 

lsucet

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May 14, 2015
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What about magnets?
 

Ctwoodtick

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How is the temp being measured? The creosote buildup at the top of the firebox that was posted in the cleaning thread made it look like the insert was running too cool.
Temp measured on top of stovetop with magnet therm. My putting screws in the doghouse air has reduced the temps (hence the buildup in box) but screws don’t stay in. Would magnets hold inside the firebox with that heat?
 

begreen

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I'm wondering if there is another source of air that is causing the issue and not the boost air. Were you able to seal up the door? Is there evidence of leakage around the top?
 

Highbeam

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Dec 28, 2006
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On the outside of the stove, if you have access to the holes you can usually block them with magnets or I've had great luck with the metal tape used for Heating ducts.

Whether to block them is up to you.
 

Ctwoodtick

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I had replaced door gasket a while back and that helped greatly but only for a couple of months then it when back to higher temps. I think it’s that the stove face has slight warp to it. I’m just trying to delay having to address the probably expensive fix to get to root of issue.
 

begreen

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Bummer, so this is treating the symptom and not the actual problem. Try pinching the gasket at the top in the area of the warp to fluff it up. To address the issue long term I'm wondering if a weld build-up could be done in that area and then ground down to make it true? Or if a careful use of a jack with a block could gently persuade it out a little?
 
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Ctwoodtick

Minister of Fire
Jun 5, 2015
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Bummer, so this is treating the symptom and not the actual problem. Try pinching the gasket at the top in the area of the warp to fluff it up. To address the issue long term I'm wondering if a weld build-up could be done in that area and then ground down to make it true? Or if a careful use of a jack with a block could gently persuade it out a little?
Maybe i call my chimney guy likely this summer to discuss the best fix. Was hoping to avoid that step but it looks like it’s going in that direction. Thanks for the ideas.
 

Ludlow

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If it looks like this, stuff it shut with a piece from an old ceramic blanket maybe?

Doghouse.jpg
 
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begreen

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A ball of aluminum foil might be easier to try.
 
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bholler

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A ball of aluminum foil might be easier to try.
Aluminum foil won't last long but it should tell them if it addresses the issue.
 

Ludlow

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Another thought, but not sure how long some rockwool would last?
 

Woody Stover

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If you can determine where the gasket is loose with the dollar-bill test, you can try pulling up the gasket in that area and putting more cement under it to elevate that section of gasket for a better seal.
 

Ctwoodtick

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Jun 5, 2015
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If you can determine where the gasket is loose with the dollar-bill test, you can try pulling up the gasket in that area and putting more cement under it to elevate that section of gasket for a better seal.
Sorry to resurrect an old thread, but I wanted to revisit. Is there a way to apply more gasket cement in area where seal is looser and have that larger bit of cement remain larger? I ask because I imagine that the cement would just get smooshed once I close the door for final curing.
 

Highbeam

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Sorry to resurrect an old thread, but I wanted to revisit. Is there a way to apply more gasket cement in area where seal is looser and have that larger bit of cement remain larger? I ask because I imagine that the cement would just get smooshed once I close the door for final curing.
Mounting the door on the stove and then lightly closing it to bed the gasket into wet rtv is a good idea. This way, the gasket contour will conform to the stove front.