Doug fir bark in the nc30

Highbeam Posted By Highbeam, Oct 10, 2018 at 6:58 PM

  1. Highbeam

    Highbeam
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 28, 2006
    14,639
    3,095
    Loc:
    Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
    It sure is fun to burn these scraps from processing the 2019/2020 fuel.
     

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  2. sutphenj

    sutphenj
    Burning Hunk 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 19, 2010
    135
    30
    Loc:
    West MI
  3. Highbeam

    Highbeam
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 28, 2006
    14,639
    3,095
    Loc:
    Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
    I burn this stove pretty hard to heat an 1800 sf building with a bigger than oem blower plus convection deck.

    Burn time is very consistent at about 3 hours for a full load of Doug fir firewood packed to the top. That’s 3.5 cubic feet of fuel per 3 hours. I’ve been able to do 3 back to back loads at that rate. These bark loads burn just as fast but I believe they are lighter so less heat is released.

    I aim to hold 700 degree stove top temperatures which is way below the safe limits for a steel stove.

    Yes, a wood furnace would be more appropriate but none are clean enough to be legal in Washington. Not even the kuuma.
     
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  4. sutphenj

    sutphenj
    Burning Hunk 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 19, 2010
    135
    30
    Loc:
    West MI
    Thats not too bad really. Might have to give it a go with my maple bark and scraps. Been thinking of making and "uglies" bin from an IBC tote I have laying around.
     
  5. Highbeam

    Highbeam
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 28, 2006
    14,639
    3,095
    Loc:
    Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
    I just hate to waste it. The maple bark is thinner but if it’s dry will burn fine. This fir bark sat out on that gravel road all summer drying out.
     
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  6. AlbergSteve

    AlbergSteve
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 11, 2017
    261
    170
    Loc:
    Vancouver Island
    I save/burn all my fir bark, there's a lot o' BTU's there!
     
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  7. jetsam

    jetsam
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 12, 2015
    2,885
    1,906
    Loc:
    Long Island, NY
    I did a full load of bark/chips/sawdust/etc last year. It didn't burn as long as a full load of wood, but it burned completely, which I didn't expect (I thought the stuff on the bottom wouldn't burn due to air not being able to get down there).
     
  8. Highbeam

    Highbeam
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 28, 2006
    14,639
    3,095
    Loc:
    Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
    It needs a lot more air to burn clean and hot in my stove so it really burns in a front to back manner. Like a huge cigar. Not many flames after the first hour or so.
     
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  9. Sodbuster

    Sodbuster
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 22, 2012
    856
    296
    Loc:
    Michigan
    I'm like you, I hate to leave BTU's to rot. "Waste not want not" is my motto when it comes to firewood. Stuff that won't cut it in January will work fine in November.
     
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  10. Sodbuster

    Sodbuster
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 22, 2012
    856
    296
    Loc:
    Michigan
    At the least it would be good for fire pit wood.
     
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