East Coaster First Pine and Spruce Scrounge and Id

mrd1995

Member
Feb 21, 2020
120
North East, Pa
I will post some pictures later, but FB Marketplace score of some Red Pine and Norway Spruce. Backed the ramp of the trailer up to the log and rolled them on. Homeowner has no clue what the species are, but I am thinking Red Pine and Norway Spruce. I am no good at the Id of conifers. Probably 2+ cords of wood though! I am excited this is the first time I will ever have burnt a conifer besides 2 x 4 scraps.
 
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SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
4,503
Downeast Maine
Any pics? The pine should have thick bark if it was a big tree. All of the red and black spruce around our house has very thin bark.
 

mrd1995

Member
Feb 21, 2020
120
North East, Pa
Any pics? The pine should have thick bark if it was a big tree. All of the red and black spruce around our house has very thin bark.
I am headed over after work today to buck the rest of the logs, I will get some pictures and post them later or in the morning. Thank you for checking out my post!
 

mrd1995

Member
Feb 21, 2020
120
North East, Pa
The Conifer in this comment I believe to be Red Pine, the one that I bucked and hauled away had a blue-gray coloration to the wood which I understand could be a fungal infection? Tree was about 20" at stump height, the standing tree in the photo is the same species as the log that I hauled out. 2 Needles per cluster and when folded tip to tip snapped clean.
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mrd1995

Member
Feb 21, 2020
120
North East, Pa
The other tree I believe to be Norway Spruce? approx. 26" at the stump and the other one was about 20" at the stump. Sap looked like honey pouring out of the log, it smelled like untreated 2 x 4 studs.

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CincyBurner

Minister of Fire
Mar 10, 2015
506
SW Ohio
+1 for red pine + Norway spruce
red pine has reddish bark, with long needles in straight fascicles of two that break cleanly. It tends to have a straight bottle brush habit. Austrian pine, another common (but non-native) two-fascicled pine has needles that do not break cleanly, bark is grayer and is susceptible to Diplodia needle cast. Scots pine has orangish bark, its habit is irregular, and its two needled fascicles are shorter and slightly twisted.
Needles of Norway spruce are shorter than Colorado (blue) spruce and branches have a pendulous habit.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
4,503
Downeast Maine
Looks like black spruce to me, but that's not a whole lot different from Norway spruce. I wish those logs were here at my house, would make great lumber!
 

mrd1995

Member
Feb 21, 2020
120
North East, Pa
Looks like black spruce to me, but that's not a whole lot different from Norway spruce. I wish those logs were here at my house, would make great lumber!
I said the same thing, my dad just purchased a woodmizer LT35HD and I wish it was in or I had a way to load the logs. Beautiful wood a shame to make cordwood out of it. Although the wife and I will appreciate it come next winter.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
4,503
Downeast Maine
I said the same thing, my dad just purchased a woodmizer LT35HD and I wish it was in or I had a way to load the logs. Beautiful wood a shame to make cordwood out of it. Although the wife and I will appreciate it come next winter.
Most of the trees on our property are Balsam Fir and Red/Black Spruce. We just got a Logosol F2+ this summer and trust me I've turned many good saw logs into firewood in the past two years before getting the mill. On the other hand I took a gamble on some logs I thought for sure would be firewood and they turned out really nice.
 
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hickoryhoarder

Feeling the Heat
Apr 5, 2013
480
Indiana
The shape of the boughs says Norway Spruce to me. I'd call that pine Red pine.
 

Poindexter

Minister of Fire
Jun 28, 2014
2,227
Fairbanks, Alaska
I didn't realize black spruce grew that far south. The ones up here are pretty scrawny, but they burn real nice. The coaling stage is really short, so you can just just reload and get back up on the secondaries (or cat) and not have to worry about finding a firebox full of coals three days into a prolonged cold snap. Fabulous cold weather wood.

I am not saying it is or isn't black spruce, I am not great at tree ID; but whatever that is I expect it to dry quick (one summer off the ground and top covered), burn hot and not have a long coaling stage.
 
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MissMac

Minister of Fire
Dec 4, 2017
638
NW Ontario
The Conifer in this comment I believe to be Red Pine, the one that I bucked and hauled away had a blue-gray coloration to the wood which I understand could be a fungal infection? Tree was about 20" at stump height, the standing tree in the photo is the same species as the log that I hauled out. 2 Needles per cluster and when folded tip to tip snapped clean.
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red pine - Pinus resinosa
 

ABMax24

Feeling the Heat
Do you have a picture of that blue colored Pine? Sounds like the fungus that is carried with Mountain Pine Beetle, but I didn't think the MPB went that far east. Unless it's the Southern Pine Beetle. Either way not good for the pine forests.

Around here we the forests have been decimated by the MPB. There's lots of dead pine around, and about 99% of the dead ones are blue inside when you cut them down.
 

mrd1995

Member
Feb 21, 2020
120
North East, Pa
Do you have a picture of that blue colored Pine? Sounds like the fungus that is carried with Mountain Pine Beetle, but I didn't think the MPB went that far east. Unless it's the Southern Pine Beetle. Either way not good for the pine forests.

Around here we the forests have been decimated by the MPB. There's lots of dead pine around, and about 99% of the dead ones are blue inside when you cut them down.
I will grab a few pictures this evening, there are definite bore holes through the bark. I am wondering if we have some beetle activity out this way, we have a few hemlock on our property but I have been seeing pine on the way to work turning brown...
 

mrd1995

Member
Feb 21, 2020
120
North East, Pa
Do you have a picture of that blue colored Pine? Sounds like the fungus that is carried with Mountain Pine Beetle, but I didn't think the MPB went that far east. Unless it's the Southern Pine Beetle. Either way not good for the pine forests.

Around here we the forests have been decimated by the MPB. There's lots of dead pine around, and about 99% of the dead ones are blue inside when you cut them down.
Here are a few pics of the pine in question, it was a little more noticeable when freshly bucked, the rounds may end up as fire pit chow a little soft.
 

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ABMax24

Feeling the Heat
Here are a few pics of the pine in question, it was a little more noticeable when freshly bucked, the rounds may end up as fire pit chow a little soft.
The blue fungus staining looks very similar to ours but the bore holes are much bigger than I'm used to. Our pine beetles are the size of a grain of rice, they make very small bore holes. Either way not a good thing. That fungus is carried by the beetles and blocks the capillaries in the tree.

I really like it for firewood though, our pine has been ravaged by the beetle for millenia and it's natural defense is to fill the boreholes with sap and flood the beetles out. That sappy wood makes for high btu fuel. I cut down one tree this winter that had so much sap a split would stick to your hand from the adhesion of the sap.
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
5,056
07462
Nice haul, split thicker and let it sit for atleast a year off the ground, will be nice burning wood in no time.