Fisher Insert

JAC4975

New Member
Oct 5, 2016
2
Maryland
Hi everyone,-

We inherited an old Fisher insert when we bought our house. Photo attached. Can someone identify the model?

We're planning to replace with a newer, flush-mounted insert this fall. We've been told that the chimney liner is not in good shape, so would upgrade to a stainless steel flue liner. Just curious if these Fishers always vent directly into the chimney, or if they can be connected to one of those liners.

Also, if we do replace, are there options for selling the Fisher?

Thanks for any ideas.
 

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lango

Member
Feb 7, 2015
24
Roscoe, Georgia
It takes some fabricating- parts are available, those things rock.
Coaly is the Fisher go- to guy, here. Or- you can research the site. Lots of info. Good luck.
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,053
NE PA
The model is "Fisher Fireplace Insert". Here is the manual;
https://www.hearth.com/images/uploads/fishinsertmanual.pdf

All Inserts must be direct connected to a liner when installed now. It is done on this appliance with a "boot".
Do lots of research before changing it out for a new one. A lot depends on how you are going to use it, what you need it for, the fuel available and heat required.
Be aware going to a flush mount, all heat is removed with a blower which is convection heat, not radiation which you get with the front half and doors on the Fisher. In a power outage, you may want the radiant stove top also for cooking. In a dry environment you may want a humidifying kettle on the stove top. You will only get dry heat with a flush mount, so if anyone has sinus issues that require moisture in the air, this unit does that very well. This unit will also burn less desirable wood with a longer duration. It will use more wood, but you also get more heat out of it.
A screen is available for open door burning if fire viewing is a concern. They are not considered a radiant heater in Fireplace Mode and the damper becomes your only control.
If you decide to keep it read the Fisher Baffle thread since a simple baffle installed when this Insert is connected to a liner makes a huge difference.
Some people are happy with a newer unit, other would like their old one back. Depends on your use.

Prices on eBay and Craigslist vary by season and this time of year prices rise. Spring and summer prices are lowest.
 
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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
23,118
central pa
Some people are happy with a newer unit, other would like their old one back. Depends on your use.
Most people who know how to use their new insert like them allot more they put out allot more heat per piece of wood than any fisher even if you put a baffle in it. Yes the flush ones work better with a blower but they still put out good heat without it as well. And you get tons of radiant heat off the glass.
 

Don H

Feeling the Heat
Aug 19, 2015
280
Maryland
Around here (Maryland) prices for Fisher inserts are a lot less than a free standing stove. A nice Papa Bear can go for $500, inserts sit on Craigslist and may not sell for more than $100.
 

Fyrhosr

New Member
Nov 11, 2016
5
California
Does anyone know if an n be used as a free standing and has the ability to add a stove pipe? Looking at building a rolling stand for the ability to move it around on an open patio.
 
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JAC4975

New Member
Oct 5, 2016
2
Maryland
Belated thanks for your suggestions. I ended up selling the Fisher (on Craigslist) for $200, and we had a new Regency I2400 put in before the holidays. Very happy with it for the most part.
 

TattedActuary

Member
Jan 6, 2016
4
greensboro, nc
I hate to be the guy who resurrects old threads when there's probably a new one out there, but I've spent a couple hours searching on here and still haven't quite found the info I need. I have this same Fisher Insert and I'm trying to figure out how to use it properly. My main confusion surrounds the damper that is a part of the insert. I've looked at the manual as well as stuck my head inside the stove and my conclusion from both of those investigations is that the damper doesn't close completely. So my question is, with this model insert, what's the best way to get a good hot fire going by getting the air flow correct with a combination of the two front air intakes and the top damper? Let's assume that my wood is good and seasoned and that I know how to build a good top down NS fire per begreen's stickie.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
23,118
central pa
I hate to be the guy who resurrects old threads when there's probably a new one out there, but I've spent a couple hours searching on here and still haven't quite found the info I need. I have this same Fisher Insert and I'm trying to figure out how to use it properly. My main confusion surrounds the damper that is a part of the insert. I've looked at the manual as well as stuck my head inside the stove and my conclusion from both of those investigations is that the damper doesn't close completely. So my question is, with this model insert, what's the best way to get a good hot fire going by getting the air flow correct with a combination of the two front air intakes and the top damper? Let's assume that my wood is good and seasoned and that I know how to build a good top down NS fire per begreen's stickie.
First it the insert hooked to a liner that runs from the stove out the top of the chimney
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,053
NE PA
No one can tell you how much to open air intakes and damper setting since the chimney, elevation, atmospheric air pressure, outdoor temperature, and many other factors change the operation.

First, make sure the Insert is connected to a liner. You should be able to look up the outlet with a flashlight or mirror to see if there is a pipe connected to it, running up the chimney. If you can't see it, remove the upper faceplate cover to look at the top of insert. It should not have the open outlet in the fireplace letting the exhaust up the chimney without having a stainless steel liner connected to the Insert. If you're looking at a hole in the top of insert and damper, you need a liner connected to the Insert.

As a rule, open both intakes 2 or 3 turns. Open flue damper fully. The flue damper is a chimney control that slows the velocity of rising gasses. This in turn slows the incoming air. So a flue damper is a chimney control that affects the stove. Keep it open until fire is established. Open it every time before you open doors. Keep it wide open until you know how to control the fire with intake air dampers.

As it starts burning larger pieces, slowly close air dampers (intakes) to about 1 turn each. This should be about right to continue burning and bring it up to temperature. Depending on chimney flue (insulated, interior or exterior) you can then close flue damper partially. This will slow the fire even more. Too much damper will slow the draft resulting in increased creosote production. So you have to check it frequently until you know how much creosote you produce. The object is keeping flue temp above 250* to the top, so the better the insulated flue, the more you can close the dampers. Warmer weather may only require the air dampers open slightly to 1/2 turn. The more heat needed, the more open. Err on the side of opening the flue damper too much. Old installations where there was no insulated liner, and using the existing larger flue for the fireplace required tons of heat to be left up, using the flue damper little to none. The better the flue is insulated, the more you can use it, not needing as much heat to be left up. It has a flat side to prevent fully closing.

If you have a screen for fire viewing, the flue damper becomes your only fire control. With screen in place, established fire, slowly close flue damper until smoke rolls in at top. Open slightly to allow smoke to evacuate, preventing some of the heat from escaping. That is the setting for open door burning. It is not considered a radiant heater in Fireplace Mode.