Getting internet to pole barn?

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tlc1976

Minister of Fire
Oct 7, 2012
846
Northwest Lower Michigan
Next week I am scheduled to get a self installation kit for fiber internet. First time in my life I’ll have had high speed internet. Been signed up for 2 1/2 years.

I want the wifi signal in my pole barn so I can use my phone, or maybe a shop computer for research, or maybe even a TV. Steel siding and roof so no signal penetration. I have on order a 300 ft cat 7 outdoor rated cable with ends. Next weekend I will bury it in a conduit for extra protection, with enough length at each end to get anywhere in the house and barn. Want it done before the ground freezes. I figure a wired connection will be the most reliable.

After that I’m new to this. Do I connect the cable to my fiber modem and put some kind of router or repeater out in the barn? Or do I have to run the cable from my home computer? Or do I need a computer in the barn to run a router? I hope I don’t have to boot up a computer out there just to get signal.
 

semipro

Minister of Fire
Jan 12, 2009
4,064
SW Virginia
If you get a cable modem that is also a Wi-Fi router you can use Wi-Fi within the house and then connect your Cat 7 cable to the Rj45 (Ethernet) port that is likely on the cable modem.
The other end of the Cat 7 cable can go directly to a computer or another router. I'd suggest you buy a Wi-Fi router for the barn then you can connect devices either by Ethernet or Wi-Fi.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
6,134
Downeast Maine
If you get a cable modem that is also a Wi-Fi router you can use Wi-Fi within the house and then connect your Cat 7 cable to the Rj45 (Ethernet) port that is likely on the cable modem.
The other end of the Cat 7 cable can go directly to a computer or another router. I'd suggest you buy a Wi-Fi router for the barn then you can connect devices either by Ethernet or Wi-Fi.
If the OP has a separate router and modem the cat 7 can go from the modem to the second router in the barn. You probably knew this, but wanted to clarify for other readers. I do agree that having two separate networks would be better than using a repeater or something different.
 
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festerw

Minister of Fire
Nov 16, 2009
514
Cambridge Springs, PA
My experience with service provider modem/router combos has been less than stellar.

If it were me I'd use the modem as a modem only and connect a wireless router (Asus just because they work well and are easy to set up)
Run the Cat7 from the router to the barn and connect another router there.

I'm sure others are similar but the Asus AIMesh allows you to connect both (either wirelessly or cabled) routers and share the same wireless network across both and is pretty simple to set up.
 
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Dataman

Minister of Fire
Sep 10, 2018
987
Newport, Wa
Ok I have Fiber Optics. You will not need Modem. Right now I bet your Fiber Optics Modem has Cat 5/6 Cable that runs to your Router. You need to get that signal out of the router to the Pole Building. I would not go Cat 7. But Cat 6, Cat 7 has harsher distance limit. Cat7 cable has harsher distance limits than Cat5e, Cat6, and Cat6a. Cat7 gets advertised for its 100 Gbps speed, but that will only work for distances up to 15 meters (slightly over 49 feet). Cat 6 has limit of 100ft. 300 ft cable runs won't work. I have similar setup and use WiFi Repeaters. One outside and one inside the metal building. Daisy chain them to see each other. One in Building hangs in window. Works great. Amazon product
 
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Dataman

Minister of Fire
Sep 10, 2018
987
Newport, Wa
My experience with service provider modem/router combos has been less than stellar.

If it were me I'd use the modem as a modem only and connect a wireless router (Asus just because they work well and are easy to set up)
Run the Cat7 from the router to the barn and connect another router there.

I'm sure others are similar but the Asus AIMesh allows you to connect both (either wirelessly or cabled) routers and share the same wireless network across both and is pretty simple to set up.
Cat7 gets advertised for its 100 Gbps speed, but that will only work for distances up to 15 meters (slightly over 49 feet).
 
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SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
6,134
Downeast Maine
I don't know for sure about distance limits, but the military uses Cat 5 and that stuff can be used over amazing distances.
 
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Dataman

Minister of Fire
Sep 10, 2018
987
Newport, Wa
If the OP hires company to put this in he will be ahead. 300ft is long pull for home owner on fiber. With
1000 Mbps Gigabit Multimode Fiber Optic Ethernet Media Converter on both ends he's golden for Great Signal. They are only about $62 dollars. More expensie in the 300ft cable run and having that ditch dug. But most just go the WiFi Repeater Setup. With outside repeater he will be Just Fine.
 
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zrock

Minister of Fire
Dec 2, 2017
1,118
bc
I would have just went with one or 2 Nano stations. One would have probably been enough and you still would have received a good signal in the pole barn with it mounted on the exterior of the house. If the signal was not enough another on the barn for receiving and you would have been good to go. Could have gotten 2 for less than what you paid for that cable
 
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festerw

Minister of Fire
Nov 16, 2009
514
Cambridge Springs, PA
Cat7 gets advertised for its 100 Gbps speed, but that will only work for distances up to 15 meters (slightly over 49 feet).

It's not like it will just stop working after that distance though. Yes the speed will be hindered but a straight 300ft run is within spec for a run. Cat6/7 will still support 100mbps over that length. I'd wager that a lot people don't get close to that and manage just fine.

Was 7 the best choice? No. Was it the worst choice? Also no. Are there better ways? Sure.
 

Nealm66

Minister of Fire
Sep 25, 2020
1,038
Western Washington
I’m a little skeptical of wifi having less attenuation than a hardline but technology is hard to keep up with. With a typical wifi repeater situation , leap frogging works but looses a lot of fizz. I have a hardline Ethernet, coax meter with a built in 3.1 modem and a poe camera about 400’ of cat 5e, from the hard drive that I could run a quick test but no time today and it’s no where near 1000mbs per second anyways. I know just being 50’ and a couple walls away from a gateway/router chops wifi speeds in half from my experience .
 
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tlc1976

Minister of Fire
Oct 7, 2012
846
Northwest Lower Michigan
Great info everyone. My fiber service will be the base plan at 100 mbps upload and download. A coworker has it in his house and he says it’s faster than anything else available in the area. Unfortunately cable doesn’t run here and I can’t get wireless either, so this is the first fast unlimited internet I’ve ever had. I don’t even care about HD or gaming, I would just like to watch some shows and YouTube and work from home and this will allow that. It’s just me here.

I will have a modem/router combo where the fiber plugs into, which will have 4 wired ports and wifi that will cover the house if it’s in a central location. I’ll wire my computer and the roku I picked up in preparation for this. And another port for the cat 7 to the barn. I’ll only use the WiFi for my phone because my cell signal is iffy too.

Goes to show I’m a newbie. I did some reading and thought cat 5 was archaic and 6 was better and 7 was better yet all around. It’s 75 feet from the corner of the house to the corner of the barn. Figured I’d leave 75 feet in the house and 150 feet in the barn and the single cable would get me anywhere without a bunch of connections that I thought would progressively degrade signal.

I paid $70 for the cable, but technically it was free because I used a gift card I won at work. But I could have spent it on something better. $40 of conduit which I can return if need be. It’s all sand here and digging is super easy. I put up a c Band dish plus a 150 ft cable trench and it was fast.

So it looks like my modem/router will connect directly to the barn router. I was looking at routers last night and it looks like a basic one with some security features is about $40. I could get a router and try it before deciding if I should get a better cable or other means before burying it. Time is ticking before the ground freezes but if I have to I’ll wait till spring.

If I get a wireless setup to “see” from the house to the barn, will it go out when it rains or if snow builds up or birds perch on it, etc? That would be a little easier and easier to upgrade in the future.
 

Dataman

Minister of Fire
Sep 10, 2018
987
Newport, Wa
No Light Rain won't matter. Birds? Repeater not really good bird perch. Best way to go is still run fiber optics. But I understand you want some save some $$$$. Couple repeaters will do the job. Run the cable and see how it works. Plan B Repeaters.
 
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festerw

Minister of Fire
Nov 16, 2009
514
Cambridge Springs, PA
If you're only talking 75 ft and you have a window facing the barn you may want to look into a mesh wifi system. It will cost more up front but you can have full coverage of your house and barn on one network and they're super easy to set up.

 
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semipro

Minister of Fire
Jan 12, 2009
4,064
SW Virginia
Great info everyone. My fiber service will be the base plan at 100 mbps upload and download. A coworker has it in his house and he says it’s faster than anything else available in the area. Unfortunately cable doesn’t run here and I can’t get wireless either, so this is the first fast unlimited internet I’ve ever had. I don’t even care about HD or gaming, I would just like to watch some shows and YouTube and work from home and this will allow that. It’s just me here.

I will have a modem/router combo where the fiber plugs into, which will have 4 wired ports and wifi that will cover the house if it’s in a central location. I’ll wire my computer and the roku I picked up in preparation for this. And another port for the cat 7 to the barn. I’ll only use the WiFi for my phone because my cell signal is iffy too.

Goes to show I’m a newbie. I did some reading and thought cat 5 was archaic and 6 was better and 7 was better yet all around. It’s 75 feet from the corner of the house to the corner of the barn. Figured I’d leave 75 feet in the house and 150 feet in the barn and the single cable would get me anywhere without a bunch of connections that I thought would progressively degrade signal.

I paid $70 for the cable, but technically it was free because I used a gift card I won at work. But I could have spent it on something better. $40 of conduit which I can return if need be. It’s all sand here and digging is super easy. I put up a c Band dish plus a 150 ft cable trench and it was fast.

So it looks like my modem/router will connect directly to the barn router. I was looking at routers last night and it looks like a basic one with some security features is about $40. I could get a router and try it before deciding if I should get a better cable or other means before burying it. Time is ticking before the ground freezes but if I have to I’ll wait till spring.

If I get a wireless setup to “see” from the house to the barn, will it go out when it rains or if snow builds up or birds perch on it, etc? That would be a little easier and easier to upgrade in the future.
One potential benefit of having a router in the shop is that you'll maintain the connection between devices there for local networking (computer, printer, media sharing, etc.) even if you're not connected to the house or internet.
I'm not sure if the other approaches mentioned allow for that.
BTW, I find that a smart speaker is really useful in the shop with music, quickly accessing specs., unit conversions, recording a list of measurements, intercoms, timers, etc. The $30 I spent on a Nest Mini is the best money I've spent in a while.

Edit: if you think you'll ever install cameras or other wired Ethernet devices at the shop you might want to consider getting a router with power over ethernet (POE) capabilities. That way you can run a single cable to other devices like cameras that provides both data and power.
 

tlc1976

Minister of Fire
Oct 7, 2012
846
Northwest Lower Michigan
I think I’ve got this. Thank you everyone. I’ve learned a lot and have been shown a lot of options and possibilities. I’ll have everything gathered this week and I’ll give it a try and hopefully bury it this weekend.

Yes I do have a window facing the barn (next to my pellet stove) and if the fiber modem had eyes it could see the barn through that window. Wifi in the yard, possibility for the future.

One thing I’ve wanted to do for years is hook up a wifi camera and relay and wire it to my stove remote so I can monitor and control the stove when away from home. By spring I’ll have a better handle on this networking stuff and be able to do that. Hacking the remote is the easy part.
 
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PistolPeets

Member
Jan 1, 2019
123
Upstate New York
I have a similar setup to your property. A 300' run to a pole barn that has power. I went with a Ubiquiti NanoStation Loco M5 5GHz. Connection starts at my home network router/switch, runs cat5e through the garage where it hits a PoE injector and runs to the transmitter Ubiquiti. Signal path is unobstructed 300' to pole barn where it hits the other Ubiquiti, which is powered by another injector off another switch. The switch in the pole barn is PoE so I run 2 PoE cameras currently. It's my understanding that I could setup a wireless access point out there and have WiFi, but I have decent enough cell reception out there that I don't bother. The Ubiquiti's are excellent. Easy to setup and the signal quality looks as if the cameras are hardwired. I also heard that 300' was the limit for a network run so I didn't want to chance it.