Harman PF100 Inner Door warped

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Duffman

Member
Feb 8, 2018
16
loc
Good evening!

Just replaced the inner door gasket (which the manual and diagram are useless for) and I noticed that after I had replaced the door that it is warped on the hinge side. I can feel a slight suction while the machine is in operation, and I am sure that it would fail the paper test

A replacement inner door is like $500 (which seems to be the norm for any weldment on this machine) and I was thinking of fabricating a new one. Its not rocket science as it is just 1/8th mild steel with a cutout for the flapper at the bottom and a cutout for the window.

or I could remove the door, heat the backside (outside) and quench repeatedly until it is more flat, or weld some sort of strip to it after clamping to make it flat

The parts diagram stated that the inner plate that is fixed to the inner door assy used pop rivets, but mine has threaded studs.

Any thoughts on going doing studs or pop rivets?

Personally I like the studs but that would mean taking the inner inner plate, marking the new piece of steel and drilling 8 or so holes to plug weld bolts into it, but i really dislike pop rivets.

Also, the hinges need to be remade, as mine are rusty as hell and the holes where the self tappers were installed have broken and my drill refuses to drill out the existing broken self tappers without diving off into the softer plate of the burn chamber materiel.

What could I do to make this machine safe to weld on? In automotive applications I simply disconnect the battery to reduce the likelihood of any stray current from frying an ecu. How can I isolate the control board from the machine to accomplish the same goal?

Thanks guys! Any input would be great.
 

Ssyko

Minister of Fire
Nov 6, 2017
4,204
Lorraine NY
Unplug the board from power then unplug from the stove harness and put it out of the way in a safe place. Ch with your local weld shops they do make a resistance welded stud no drilling required
 

Washed-Up

Minister of Fire
Nov 5, 2011
660
Kananaskis,Alberta, Canada
Would a thicker rope gasket make a difference?
 

Duffman

Member
Feb 8, 2018
16
loc
Unplug the board from power then unplug from the stove harness and put it out of the way in a safe place. Ch with your local weld shops they do make a resistance welded stud no drilling required
Fair enough, what do you think about the sensors? Think they would be damaged at all? I don't think so but
Would a thicker rope gasket make a difference?


I did just replace the gasket, so if anything I thought it would have sealed up. My question is though, does it matter?
There’s a flapper door at the bottom that pulls in allowing some amount of air in based on the draft being pulled. So, do I even need to fix it?

the hinges do need to be taken care of, that’s for sure
 

SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
When welding on ANY stove, always isolate the control board and ALWAYS put the welding machine ground as close to the 'to be welded' area as possible to mitigate any stray current. The shorter the current path (from the weld point to the ground point) is SOP in any welding scenario.

That applies to any welding, not just a stove.
 

zrock

Minister of Fire
Dec 2, 2017
1,117
bc
With the rope gasket you can bunch it up tighter on the hinge side and stretch it out on the rest of the door to get a good tight seal
 
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