Hearthstone vs Jotul

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Disco_Kai

New Member
Oct 7, 2020
2
NJ
Moved into a new house and looking to get a wood stove. Had a coal/wood combo Russo in the old house that worked alright but looking for something a little better.

House is about 2200 SF and plan to run the stove as much as possible to offset the oil costs. Not expecting to heat the whole house since it's not very open but hope to try!

I am between two stoves right now, a Hearthstone Phoenix 8612 or Jotul F500.
The hearthstone is cheaper but looks excellent! I know it takes longer to heat up but I plan to keep it going constantly especially since I'm working from home now.
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The Jotul appears to be the go-to stove around here but is about twice the price and looks to be used a lot more than the Hearthstone.
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These are the two brands I am considering while looking around. Talk me into or out of the other!
 

adrpga498

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2005
942
New Jersey
Both very good stoves, I have the Jotul f400 which is a bit smaller then the 500 and I was able to cut oil consumption by 70% and my bi-lever house is a bout 2500sq.ft. Central NJ. I would get which ever has bigger firebox.
 

bunfoolio

Member
Mar 13, 2015
121
merrimac, ma
Happy ower of a jotul Oslo f500 here. Does a great job of heating my 3000 sqft home. The hearthstone is not a bad looking stove either. If price is a big issue that would not be q bad choice.
 
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mark cline

Minister of Fire
Dec 20, 2012
762
Cattaraugus, NY
I have a Hearthstone Mansfield, a stove 2x larger than the Phoenix, but soapstone in general is a phenomenal heat holding and heat transfer surface . It may take longer to heat up to optimum temperature but it will also take much longer to cool off , providing a longer more even heat output. Secondly, soapstone gives off a softer , more controlled heat, you don’t get that scorching overheated heat , not the huge swing in temperature that a steel or cast stove creates. On the other hand, soapstone is somewhat fragile. If you throw wood into the stove and hit the side or back wall, you could crack the stone. Yearly startup has a specific procedure to drive moisture out of the soapstone to prevent cracking. Also soapstone will naturally crack , its stone with flaws and inclusions that are weak but the majority of cracks will not affect the performance of the stove. In my opinion, you will thoroughly enjoy the Hearthstone, but be mindful of overheating by leaving a door open or the draft open that will create a potential destructive situation . I’m sure the Jotul is an excellent stove, but in my opinion, the Hearthstone is a step up.
 

firefighterjake

Minister of Fire
Jul 22, 2008
19,593
Unity/Bangor, Maine
I suspect either would be OK for your use, but I will readily admit I am biased towards Jotul as the F500 has proven to be a very reliable workhorse of a woodstove. In my own case the F500 is responsible for maybe 90-95% of my heating needs in the winter with the only items replaced being two gaskets and a baffle blanket since being put into use in 2008.
 
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Disco_Kai

New Member
Oct 7, 2020
2
NJ
I have a Hearthstone Mansfield, a stove 2x larger than the Phoenix, but soapstone in general is a phenomenal heat holding and heat transfer surface . It may take longer to heat up to optimum temperature but it will also take much longer to cool off , providing a longer more even heat output. Secondly, soapstone gives off a softer , more controlled heat, you don’t get that scorching overheated heat , not the huge swing in temperature that a steel or cast stove creates. On the other hand, soapstone is somewhat fragile. If you throw wood into the stove and hit the side or back wall, you could crack the stone. Yearly startup has a specific procedure to drive moisture out of the soapstone to prevent cracking. Also soapstone will naturally crack , its stone with flaws and inclusions that are weak but the majority of cracks will not affect the performance of the stove. In my opinion, you will thoroughly enjoy the Hearthstone, but be mindful of overheating by leaving a door open or the draft open that will create a potential destructive situation . I’m sure the Jotul is an excellent stove, but in my opinion, the Hearthstone is a step up.
This is great info. Didn't realize their would be a certain startup procedure to drive moisture out, will have to check that out in the manual.

I plan on getting the Hearthstone as long as it isn't cracked. Seller claims it was never used either. Seems to be comparable and with the cost savings I can buy a few cords of wood.
 

kborndale

Feeling the Heat
Oct 9, 2008
423
LI
You need to buy a few cords of wood a year before you buy your stove or else you will be very disappointed with whichever stove you choose.
 
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Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
19,860
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
The mansfield is only 3 cubic feet and that phoenix is no slouch at 2.2 cubes. So the manny is just 36% bigger not 200% bigger!

I had a 2.3 CF heritage for many years and chose it over the phoenix because of more stone, the side door, and the phoenix had a blanket above the baffle. The phoenix is a good looking stove but hearthstones are not built to last if you use them. Hinges get sloppy, door latches wear out, and stones crack. These things are only replaceable with a complete stove rebuild down to a pile of rocks. After 30 cords went through my hearthstone I sold it away because this wear was becoming a problem and the solution not feasible. So no, I wouldn't recommend the hearthsone unless you just want to look at it. It's a great looking stove. They are also horribly slow to heat up. That's not made up for by slowly cooling down because you're not freezing when you let the stove get cold. Stone stoves are fine if you keep them hot.

I've never owned a Jotul but they are also very attractive. Is this Jotul one of the kind that is just bolted together chunks of iron? With some pooky between the chunks to seal the edges? That you need to "occasionally" rebuild? If so, consider how far away you are from that maintenance. I would prefer something steel and welded together.
 
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Sailrmike

Feeling the Heat
Sep 20, 2017
295
06371
The mansfield is only 3 cubic feet and that phoenix is no slouch at 2.2 cubes. So the manny is just 36% bigger not 200% bigger!

I had a 2.3 CF heritage for many years and chose it over the phoenix because of more stone, the side door, and the phoenix had a blanket above the baffle. The phoenix is a good looking stove but hearthstones are not built to last if you use them. Hinges get sloppy, door latches wear out, and stones crack. These things are only replaceable with a complete stove rebuild down to a pile of rocks. After 30 cords went through my hearthstone I sold it away because this wear was becoming a problem and the solution not feasible. So no, I wouldn't recommend the hearthsone unless you just want to look at it. It's a great looking stove. They are also horribly slow to heat up. That's not made up for by slowly cooling down because you're not freezing when you let the stove get cold. Stone stoves are fine if you keep them hot.

I've never owned a Jotul but they are also very attractive. Is this Jotul one of the kind that is just bolted together chunks of iron? With some pooky between the chunks to seal the edges? That you need to "occasionally" rebuild? If so, consider how far away you are from that maintenance. I would prefer something steel and welded together.

Yes the traditional Jotul cast iron stoves need rebuilding, but only after 20-25 yrs of heavy burning. At that point, I'd be happy to recycle the iron and purchase new tech. These things arent built like a CDW 5 cord stoves, believe me.