Heating 250 sq ft yurt

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Annieaptos

New Member
Sep 6, 2016
2
Aptos , ca
Building a 250 sq ft yurt. I like the looks of the Morso Classic 2B but concerned about the 2 chambers on top come to meet the chimney pipe. Does this design complicate things? Compare to other small stoves - the small jotuls (forget the names) for example. Also the cigar box vs the smaller box on the Morso 1410. Thanks! I live in Aptos ca coastal region. This will be a writing / pottery studio.
 

webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
10,908
Indiana
Morso makes a nice little stove. Considering your square footage, I doubt the added heat exchanger will be of any benefit. The Jotul 602 or F-100 will both do great for you. Is it a Colorado Yurt?
 

Annieaptos

New Member
Sep 6, 2016
2
Aptos , ca
Morso makes a nice little stove. Considering your square footage, I doubt the added heat exchanger will be of any benefit. The Jotul 602 or F-100 will both do great for you. Is it a Colorado Yurt?
Not Colorado. We are building the yurt from scratch. Technically it's a dodecagon(12 sided) wood structure. The Jotul 602 looks good, though less glass in front to see the fire. Too bad about the Morso. I love the rabbit on the side and the ash drawer is a plus. The Morso 1410 looks like a pain to cut the wood into 12". So the jotul it may be. Thanks!
 
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skinanbones

Feeling the Heat
Feb 10, 2011
303
Ontario
I would strongly consider the Jotul f-100 if you want viewing glass. It's almost the same firebox size as the 602, and it's a under rated heater. Another differant option might be the newest Pacific Energy Neo 1.2, it's simular in firebox size as well.
 
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webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
10,908
Indiana
I agree. The F-100 is the way to go if you want the fire view.
 

St. Coemgen

Feeling the Heat
Feb 4, 2016
259
Hungary
www.stcoemgen.com
Building a 250 sq ft yurt. I like the looks of the Morso Classic 2B but concerned about the 2 chambers on top come to meet the chimney pipe. Does this design complicate things? Compare to other small stoves - the small jotuls (forget the names) for example. Also the cigar box vs the smaller box on the Morso 1410. Thanks! I live in Aptos ca coastal region. This will be a writing / pottery studio.
Many variables here.

- Are you building a yurt from a commercial source like Pacific Yurts? If so, then best to ask them for the best wood oven size.

- If you are self building a yurt, be aware that:

a) What is the R-factor for your yurt walls? Most heating estimates for stoves are based on ideal space heating and insulation standards which is unlikely for a yurt.

b) Do note that sq ft heating recommendations are based on standard North American building standards (such as ceiling height). So if you have a vaulted ceiling, which are typical for a yurt, heat recommendations by sq ft may be less than ideal or useful. Better to calculate the stove you need based on your space volume to heat and your wall R-factor, not just your sq ft.

- The Morso Classic 2B is rated for max 1200 sq ft. Which is way, way too much heat for just 250 sq ft.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
82,470
South Puget Sound, WA
The space will heat up quickly with any of the stoves mentioned. Assuming a fire start at an ambient 40F outside temp, I can take our 240 sq ft greenhouse with a lot of glass from 40F to 65F in about 30 minutes with the Jotul F602. It takes another 30 minutes if the temp outside is 30F. This is with the original F602 which might be better for your application too, but no glass door. I suspect that most of the time the heat will be for chill chasing to take the edge off of foggy days. Given the short bursts of fuel you will need for heating most days, robust secondary burn may not be achieved. Still, the F602 is a good compromise and you can always open a window if it gets too warm, or just add less fuel on the refill. Another idea to consider is boat stoves. The Navigator Sardine is tiny home sized. http://tinyhouseswoon.com/jenns-tiny-house/ Also available is the Kimberly, but it is quite pricey. http://www.tinyhouseliving.com/tiny-wood-stove-ellas-tiny-house/
 

EatenByLimestone

Minister of Fire
Jul 12, 2006
7,326
Schenectady, NY
What's your low temperature? Given the space considerations and (I'm pretty sure) a mild climate, I think propane might be your best choice. If you're just chasing the chill off for a couple hours a portable heater like the little buddy is what I'd be looking at.
 

webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
10,908
Indiana
What's your low temperature? Given the space considerations and (I'm pretty sure) a mild climate, I think propane might be your best choice. If you're just chasing the chill off for a couple hours a portable heater like the little buddy is what I'd be looking at.
Possibly. But typically people building a yurt are trying to stay as close to nature and self sustaining as possible. i.e, not propane.. But you never know
 
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EatenByLimestone

Minister of Fire
Jul 12, 2006
7,326
Schenectady, NY
That's certainly true. If the low temp is 40, I can't see somebody being happy with a standard sized wood stove in a 250 square foot building. Maybe a marine stove, but ???.
 
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