Help required- new to real fireplaces!!

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That's a pretty burn, and fireplace! :) You think you are getting any net heat from it, or is the radiant heat into the room negated by the chimney pulling warm air out of the house? A fireplace for ambience is fine, especially if your main heat source is efficient and economical. I don't know what methods of heating they use there..oil, gas, electric? We have lots of dead trees here, and I don't mind the work, so wood it is..
 
That's a pretty burn, and fireplace! :) You think you are getting any net heat from it, or is the radiant heat into the room negated by the chimney pulling warm air out of the house? A fireplace for ambience is fine, especially if your main heat source is efficient and economical. I don't know what methods of heating they use there..oil, gas, electric? We have lots of dead trees here, and I don't mind the work, so wood it is..
Haha thank you, it's an old fashioned fireplace so it suits the house and would have probably had something like it originally

We ripped out a horrible 70s gas fire and put this classic back in

We have standard central heating with radiators so we dont rely on this for heat, it's an add on

With the properly dry logs you can really feel the difference in it heating the room actually compared to what it was like with what I now know to be wet logs!!

I suppose most of the heat is going up the chimney, so I am heating my street for my neighbours haha but I do still get a good heat too in the room
 
Thank you for staying with us on this question. The narrow holes in the bottom of the grate will clog with ash pretty quickly thereby reducing air flow to the bottom of the growing fire. Combined with no air holes in the rear, the fire will soon die down. All fires need fuel and oxygen.... period. Bellows were used to increase and disperse the oxygen flow to the combustion areas, thereby increasing the heat.

One idea might be to make or find a small grate that you can put in the existing hopper, but sitting perhaps an inch or so off the bottom. Kind of like a steam tray for vegetables in a pot of boiling water. This will allow some ash to fall but retain an air source below the burning logs and may sustain the fire longer.
 
Thank you for staying with us on this question. The narrow holes in the bottom of the grate will clog with ash pretty quickly thereby reducing air flow to the bottom of the growing fire. Combined with no air holes in the rear, the fire will soon die down. All fires need fuel and oxygen.... period. Bellows were used to increase and disperse the oxygen flow to the combustion areas, thereby increasing the heat.

One idea might be to make or find a small grate that you can put in the existing hopper, but sitting perhaps an inch or so off the bottom. Kind of like a steam tray for vegetables in a pot of boiling water. This will allow some ash to fall but retain an air source below the burning logs and may sustain the fire longer.
No thank you all for sticking with my definite daft newbie questions!!

I am sure that air is still getting through the grates, as per the pics..?

I have solved probably my main issue anyway I think judging by the fact I am still going strong after an hour, I've just added another log too and the way these burn is night and day compared to the crap I was using initially!
 

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I meant the one I replied to, not the OP's definite coal fireplace.
That is a modified Rumford box the side are not angled hard enough and it is to deep to be a true Rumford. It also has some very very serious clearance issues with the trim
 
Thank you for staying with us on this question. The narrow holes in the bottom of the grate will clog with ash pretty quickly thereby reducing air flow to the bottom of the growing fire. Combined with no air holes in the rear, the fire will soon die down. All fires need fuel and oxygen.... period. Bellows were used to increase and disperse the oxygen flow to the combustion areas, thereby increasing the heat.

One idea might be to make or find a small grate that you can put in the existing hopper, but sitting perhaps an inch or so off the bottom. Kind of like a steam tray for vegetables in a pot of boiling water. This will allow some ash to fall but retain an air source below the burning logs and may sustain the fire longer.
There is no need at all for anything additional. Yes some ash will probably build up in the bottom but that is a good think it will be somewhere for atleast a little bit of coal to be held. This will never Bevan efficient or long burning heater. But it is a beautiful price and as a decorative fireplace I think it is fantastic. And no bellows aren't needed either just dry wood.
 
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Sorry, mine?
No, the other photos posted from another user. My apologies for derailing things a bit.

You should try and get some smokeless coal briquettes for your fireplace. Most are made in Northern Ireland I believe.
 
There is no need at all for anything additional. Yes some ash will probably build up in the bottom but that is a good think it will be somewhere for atleast a little bit of coal to be held. This will never Bevan efficient or long burning heater. But it is a beautiful price and as a decorative fireplace I think it is fantastic. And no bellows aren't needed either just dry wood.
It does look good.
 
There is no need at all for anything additional. Yes some ash will probably build up in the bottom but that is a good think it will be somewhere for atleast a little bit of coal to be held. This will never Bevan efficient or long burning heater. But it is a beautiful price and as a decorative fireplace I think it is fantastic. And no bellows aren't needed either just dry wood.
Thank you

Mine not the style that you American guys go for, too old fashioned?

In summary are you all telling me that my fireplace is designed for coal, not wood?

So whilst it is burning the wood well now (due to it being dry stuff, funnily enough haha..) it would burn coal all the better?
 
Thank you

Mine not the style that you American guys go for, too old fashioned?

In summary are you all telling me that my fireplace is designed for coal, not wood?

So whilst it is burning the wood well now (due to it being dry stuff, funnily enough haha..) it would burn coal all the better?
I meant wood coals not actual coal.
 
Thank you

Mine not the style that you American guys go for, too old fashioned?

In summary are you all telling me that my fireplace is designed for coal, not wood?

So whilst it is burning the wood well now (due to it being dry stuff, funnily enough haha..) it would burn coal all the better?
Congrats on getting your fire going. While in theory I don't think the coal cradle is ideal for wood--- if something works, then it works.
 
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Congrats on getting your fire going. While in theory I don't think the coal cradle is ideal --- if something works, then it works.
Maybe it's the Scottish wind down the chimney!
Making it work

Blowin' a hooley! (Haha if fairy liquid stumped you all i would love to see your face trying to work out what the hell I just said there!)
 
Thank you

Mine not the style that you American guys go for, too old fashioned?

In summary are you all telling me that my fireplace is designed for coal, not wood?

So whilst it is burning the wood well now (due to it being dry stuff, funnily enough haha..) it would burn coal all the better?
To me there is nothing to old fashioned. Good interesting design is just that. It doesn't really matter when it was done.
 
That is truly a beautiful unit and a valuable addition to your home. For ambiance alone it is worth it now that you figured out how to get a fire in it.