High Temperature Issues Alderlea T6

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Ohio Valley

New Member
Dec 22, 2021
7
Ohio, USA
I recently purchased a Pacific Energy Alderlea T6 to replace my Vermont Casting Dutchwest (cat stove). I'm having issues controlling the temperature of my new stove. I'm seeing Temperature up to 850 degrees, even when air is turned down all the way. It seems that the stove will hit 600 -700 degrees with just a couple splits no matter what I do. I checked the ash door and the gaskets around the door, and everything appears to be fine. I did notice the two additional holes in the bottom of the stove, and I assume that is how the stove ensures a minimum burn. I am curious if anyone would have suggestions on how I might fix the high temperatures problem? I contacted PE and they said it's fine as long as the top isn't glowing red. I have a hard time accepting that answer. Below are a few specs that might be needed.

Chimney: 25 feet, Double walled stainless lined and filled with TherMix for insulation.
Pipe: 40 inches straight off stove to a 90 leading into a 42 inches long wall thimble. Then into a "T" and up and out. All double walled, All installed by professionals
Wood: All hardwood, primarily Oak. Seasoned 18-24 months with an average 17%- 20% moister (on fresh split).
Flue Temp: Typically around 500 - 650 degrees
Picture: Shows main air, and two additional hole (I'm assuming air wash and minimum burn?)

IMG_0995.jpeg
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
94,486
South Puget Sound, WA
Can you show what would be a typical load of wood in the stove to reach that temp? How is the temperature being read and where? I helped put in a 2020 T6 LE last year on a 20', straight up flue and it runs pretty much the same as our 2008 T6. Part of the problem may be the way the stove is loaded. Do you load lincoln log style or crisscrossed wood, or all aligned N/S?

The hole with the weld bead is for the boost air. This is not necessary, particularly if the draft is strong. Try putting a magnet or some metal tape over it and see if that helps. Also consider adding a key damper to the stove pipe to reduce draft strength.

FWIW, I would love it if I could get the stovetop up to 700º on two splits. That would save me a lot of fuel.
 

Ohio Valley

New Member
Dec 22, 2021
7
Ohio, USA
I have tried both N/S and E/W loading with little to no differences in rate or temperature of burn. E/W does seem to be little more controllable, but not by much. My load typically consist of oak splits (roughly 4-5 inch diameter, 18" long), and I stack them in tight (minimize air space between pieces) to about the hight of the fire brick. I'm seeing an average 10 hour burn time (with plenty of coals for restart). For small fires I've been placing a couple pieces of oak (same size as mentioned above) N/S right next to each other or one on top of the other, in the center of firebox. I agree with you on the temperature achieved with so little fuel, but I also like to be able to control the burn. I know there is a learning curve, but I'm struggling with this one.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
94,486
South Puget Sound, WA
That sounds good. You can load within an inch of the baffle without issue.

How is the temperature being measured and where?
 
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Ohio Valley

New Member
Dec 22, 2021
7
Ohio, USA
Stove top temperatures are measured with a magnetic thermometer on cook surface. Picture attached. The stove temp showing in the picture is from a couple pieces of wood added at roughly 5:30 AM. I'm a fan of the stove, just need to work a few things out.

IMG_0996.jpeg
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
94,486
South Puget Sound, WA
That's the right spot to read. Next fire, try closing down the air sooner. That makes a big difference in how hot the stove ultimately gets. Turn down the air as quickly as possible without causing the fire to smolder. Usually, with hardwood on our stove, this is around 10 minutes, when the flames just start licking the baffle. I turn down the air enough to slow down the flame at that point. This is about a 50-60% reduction in air. Then wait another 5 minutes until the fire regains strength and turn it down again until the flame gets lazier. Wait, then repeat. By the third time, our stove's air is turned all the way down.

You are doing well and to be congratulated for having good dry firewood. If tweaking procedure doesn't help get the stove where you want it to be (650-700º stovetop temp), then try blocking the boost air port and consider adding a key damper to reduce draft once the fire is burning well. FYI, our stove's boost air port has been blocked for most of its life. With good draft and dry wood it has not been necessary.
 
Oct 13, 2020
167
Quebec, Canada
I use a probe thermometer in my double wall stove pipe to obtain a truer temp reading than on my stove top, on my PE as soon as the probe thermometer hits about 300° I start seriously shutting the air intake down by 75% - 80% , as soon as the stove approaches 400° I shut it down fully. If I do not do that my stove will climb up to 800° in no time. Depending on outside temps and wood fed in to the box if the fire dies down after start up I will simply open the air control again for 5-6 minutes and close it off again after.
 

MR. GLO

Feeling the Heat
Jan 26, 2021
352
Massachusetts
800 on stt? How much wood in stove? Are you stuffing it each time. Is this on reloads only?
 
Oct 13, 2020
167
Quebec, Canada
800 on stt? How much wood in stove? Are you stuffing it each time. Is this on reloads only?
It is on fresh start up and some reloads, this does not happen with large splits, it will occur when throwing in 5-6 pieces of really dry wood 1 to 2 inch splits over a bunch of kindling to get her hot again. If I have lots of red hot coals I will rake them to the front and simply drop in a couple of 7-8 inch splits, those when fully lit up will cruise at 450° to 550° with the air intake fully closed. My 24 foot chimney draws overly well.
 

MR. GLO

Feeling the Heat
Jan 26, 2021
352
Massachusetts
I just got the pe summit pedestal no ash pan 3 days ago ($2600.00) and I'm seeing the stove cruising and air inlet closed after charring to over 550 Stt . So far so good...but if I add one more log it will creep to 650.

The air inlet control on this stove is nothing like a jotul Rangely or other stoves ive owned. I cannot shut it down once it gets going. Even if I close too early it will still run and smolder.

If I add a bunch of smaller splits it will burn hot and not last long. So I'm guessing only way to control is number and size of logs.

I have not stuffed it yet and don't plan too..

My draft is .14 and my stove still burns good but I will play with the damper at a later time...I want to see how the chimney looks.

Use the small logs on first burn..

But 800 stt seems high. Frustrating some manufacturers are not listing draft and stt numbers in the manuals.
 

Woody5506

Minister of Fire
Feb 14, 2017
898
Rochester NY
I've definitely hit 800 on my T5 though that's not exactly casual burning for me. 700 though is pretty normal. I've never seen my stove top glow at all. Your chimney is almost twice as long as mine and these stoves are easy breathers. My guess would just be yours is drafting heavily.
 
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Caw

Minister of Fire
May 26, 2020
1,288
Massachusetts
I've definitely hit 800 on my T5 though that's not exactly casual burning for me. 700 though is pretty normal. I've never seen my stove top glow at all. Your chimney is almost twice as long as mine and these stoves are easy breathers. My guess would just be yours is drafting heavily.
I have a different non cat steel stove (Osburn 1600) but cruising around 700 +/- 50 is pretty normal for me. I have a 24' chimney and the stove likes to burn.

I don't really get nervous until 750+. I've only had one brief overfire since I've had it and that was my own fault for walking away before it was settled. Hit 800-850 for about 10 minutes. It's never over fired on its own when stuffed and run properly.

Bottom line is I think 700 is pretty normal STT for modern non cat stoves with strong chimneys. If you're cruising any higher than that on average using proper techniques/good wood then a key damper is probably the next step.
 
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MR. GLO

Feeling the Heat
Jan 26, 2021
352
Massachusetts
I'm starting to realize at these frigid temps 700 goal might be better...today I closed the pipe damper and the best I could get on draft is .08 but I can live with that. I usually set and work the air inlet to about 3/4 closed. It's windy but my area 70 percent of the time always changing directions.... I don't see glow either on 750 or so. I emailed pe on draft readings and no response yet. But since I got a bigger and new EPA stove I have slept better.
 

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Caw

Minister of Fire
May 26, 2020
1,288
Massachusetts
FWIW I contacted SBI and they consider 840 degrees an overfire for my steel 2019 Osburn 1600. So, cruising around 700 +/- 50 is perfectly normal.
 
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MR. GLO

Feeling the Heat
Jan 26, 2021
352
Massachusetts
That's the right spot to read. Next fire, try closing down the air sooner. That makes a big difference in how hot the stove ultimately gets. Turn down the air as quickly as possible without causing the fire to smolder. Usually, with hardwood on our stove, this is around 10 minutes, when the flames just start licking the baffle. I turn down the air enough to slow down the flame at that point. This is about a 50-60% reduction in air. Then wait another 5 minutes until the fire regains strength and turn it down again until the flame gets lazier. Wait, then repeat. By the third time, our stove's air is turned all the way down.

You are doing well and to be congratulated for having good dry firewood. If tweaking procedure doesn't help get the stove where you want it to be (650-700º stovetop temp), then try blocking the boost air port and consider adding a key damper to reduce draft once the fire is burning well. FYI, our stove's boost air port has been blocked for most of its life. With good draft and dry wood it has not been necessary.
Great info...With this method of turning down how long do you see smoke out chimney. Seems like the steam and smoke colors are pretty close with clean burn of the PE. Did you ever time the difference with the boost hole covered? I covered it but i didnt see the draft drop on the gauge but I will test more.
 

Woody5506

Minister of Fire
Feb 14, 2017
898
Rochester NY
I have a different non cat steel stove (Osburn 1600) but cruising around 700 +/- 50 is pretty normal for me. I have a 24' chimney and the stove likes to burn.

I don't really get nervous until 750+. I've only had one brief overfire since I've had it and that was my own fault for walking away before it was settled. Hit 800-850 for about 10 minutes. It's never over fired on its own when stuffed and run properly.

Bottom line is I think 700 is pretty normal STT for modern non cat stoves with strong chimneys. If you're cruising any higher than that on average using proper techniques/good wood then a key damper is probably the next step.
I will say it takes nearly nothing to get my STT to 800 on my T5. This can be a full load with an average mid range flue temp even. Not once have I ever seen anything on my stove glow red besides the baffle and the tabs that hold the baffle in place. Being internal components this never worried me but in the few times I have seen those glow red then I know for sure I'm running too hot. I also question my stove top thermometer a bit, and lately my readings have been done with that thing on the actual stove top, but the trivets closed over it, so I'm curious if that causes it to read higher. At the end of the day I don't pay a ton of attention to STT compared to flue temp. With the air shut down on a full load the stove is hovering around 750.
 

Danaad

New Member
Feb 2, 2022
23
Oklahoma
Can you show what would be a typical load of wood in the stove to reach that temp? How is the temperature being read and where? I helped put in a 2020 T6 LE last year on a 20', straight up flue and it runs pretty much the same as our 2008 T6. Part of the problem may be the way the stove is loaded. Do you load lincoln log style or crisscrossed wood, or all aligned N/S?

The hole with the weld bead is for the boost air. This is not necessary, particularly if the draft is strong. Try putting a magnet or some metal tape over it and see if that helps. Also consider adding a key damper to the stove pipe to reduce draft strength.

FWIW, I would love it if I could get the stovetop up to 700º on two splits. That would save me a lot of fuel.
how interesting, I have a t5 with the exact problem, where is this weld located so I can try to put a magnet on it?
 

MR. GLO

Feeling the Heat
Jan 26, 2021
352
Massachusetts
I covered the boost hole the last two weeks...IMO...it seems like it slows the rate but the stove still creeps sometimes to 750-800 stt. One part on the stove, center left is much hotter than the other areas. It also changes the burn sometimes toward the rear of the stove instead of front. The only way im going to get more burn time is a damper and then fight lower flue temps. my draft is too high .12 - 14. I tried changing the pipe with a longer run and more of a straight pipe out top, instead of a quicks turn after damper, but that lower flue temps too.. Next year im going to try double wall pipe but ill lose heat. Its a battle to find a perfect setting...
I cant find anywhere in the manual and PE wont tell me the STT range. It still runs nice I just have to watch the STT, by adjusting the load. Seems like it has a lot more steam out the chimney than previous stoves. If anyone knows your draft on a PE or similar stove can you post the results.
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
5,207
Long Island NY
It is the first post at the top of this page. Just scroll up.
 

Danaad

New Member
Feb 2, 2022
23
Oklahoma
I see the one photo with the welded hole , how did you get to view that ? what did you take apart to reach that welded whole and it looks like you accessed the damper. I would like to look at the damper link as you have in that photo, thanks.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
94,486
South Puget Sound, WA
It is on fresh start up and some reloads, this does not happen with large splits, it will occur when throwing in 5-6 pieces of really dry wood 1 to 2 inch splits over a bunch of kindling to get her hot again. If I have lots of red hot coals I will rake them to the front and simply drop in a couple of 7-8 inch splits, those when fully lit up will cruise at 450° to 550° with the air intake fully closed. My 24 foot chimney draws overly well.
This is user induced overheating. All preventable by proper operation which will be necessary with a tallish flue.