Highly insulated house and stove size

frozenfiber Posted By frozenfiber, Aug 9, 2019 at 1:53 AM

  1. Poindexter

    Poindexter
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    "Truck" could be anything from a Tacoma to a full size Kenworth with a sleeper cabin and extended bed.

    Successful tractor trailer drivers up here do their own maintenance. In their own shop, at home.

    FWIW my wife drives a Rav4, +/- 1800 lbs, I don't do anything special for that. If this truck that the OP is talking about is 10k pounds of Peterbuilt that has been out all day at +32 dF we basically have a 5 ton refrigeration system in a daily death match with a wood stove. It isn't specified, but even a panel truck full of mac tools or plumbing equipment out in the cold all day I personally would thermally decouple the house from the shop and put a whopper non cat in the shop.

    Get home, light the big non cat, let the air in the shop get up to 100, 110 dF above, come back after dinner and a shower when the air in the shop and the truck are both around 75dF... With a 16 foot ceiling in the shop they could fit a whopper OTR tractor in there.
     
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  2. lsucet

    lsucet
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    Keep rubbing it in::P
     
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  3. jetsam

    jetsam
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    So 24x7 still means "24 hours a day, 7 days a week", and may be used if you reload the stove every 40 hours or every 4 hours.

    Now that that's cleared up... SPF dries in one year and it's lighter! It also doesn't coal up when there's a real cold snap and you're burning on high. I go past oak to get pine if I don't have any pine in the stacks. Neener, neener.

    I don't think I could go 40 hours cat active on a load of oak, either. Maybe if I had huge squared-off splits and packed it in completely full, but not in real operation.
     
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  4. frozenfiber

    frozenfiber
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    Thank you for such great info. Some things were brought up that we never thought of. My husband's work truck is a 26ft RV looking truck never thought about it being a giant fridge pulling in each night.

    We actually did insulate and seal between the house and shop.

    Thank you for the reminder about direct air intake we planned on it but forgot to check on the top contending stove other than BK.
     
  5. Highbeam

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    So I heat a shop that is 1800 sf, 14’ ceilings with above average insulation all around using just about the biggest noncat stove you can buy. Even though my climate is warmer than Alaska usually and even though I am not pulling in a large cold truck, a wood stove can only put out so much heat. I run the noncat at the safe maximum limits and still it takes all day to bring the interior up from 40 to 70. Be reasonable here, unless you have a furnace in the shop there will be no 100 degree temperatures without extreme efforts.
     
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  6. Poindexter

    Poindexter
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    I don't disagree with Highbeam. A 26 foot panel van with who knows what in it for product, will likely absorb a LOT of BTUs.
     
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  7. Ashful

    Ashful
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    The specific heat of an object is the amount of heat required to raise a given mass by a given temperature. Iron runs 0.129 BTU/lb, so a 26 ft. moving truck (which ironically weighs in at GVWR = 26,000 lb., according to Enterprise), would take 3350 BTU per degF. If you’re bringing it up from -20 degF to +70 degF, you’re talking about 302,000 BTU, over the course of a few hours. Yes, it is going to suck the room temperature down a bit, in those first few hours.
     
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  8. Highbeam

    Highbeam
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    More importantly maybe are the concrete slab, building weight, and the weight of other contents going from 40 to 100 which will also take some energy and time.
     
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  9. Ashful

    Ashful
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    Good point, depending on the scenario. I had assumed they were already at steady-state temp, when pulling a cold truck into shop.
     
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