How am I going to get the stove in position

Mikelly Posted By Mikelly, Feb 26, 2019 at 7:58 AM

  1. Mikelly

    Mikelly
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 26, 2019
    10
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    Loc:
    East Texas
    You probably have a lot more wood burning experience than I do but I don't agree. By next fall the wood will have seasoned 18 months and it's already turned gray.
     
  2. Mojappa

    Mojappa
    Member 2.
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    Mar 14, 2018
    122
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    Loc:
    Gerrardstown, WV
    best way to know for sure is spend 20-30 bucks on a moisture meter and test a few pieces from different parts of the stack. If it's stacked in single rows, top covered, and the weather's been good to ya then it should be burnable by 2019/2020 winter....might be just barely but should be below 20% by then
     
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  3. Chimney Smoke

    Chimney Smoke
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 24, 2013
    673
    229
    Loc:
    Maine
    I paid the local stove shop an extra $50 to move mine from the basement up to the first floor when they were here to install my class a chimney. I used to do everything myself to save a few bucks and now I realize sometimes paying is cheaper and easier.
     
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  4. MAD MARK

    MAD MARK
    Feeling the Heat 2.
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    Jan 31, 2016
    326
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    Loc:
    Pittsburgh PA
    The consensus here with proven data is some oak takes 3 years to season properly.

    Just cause its GRAY on the outside, doesn't mean its DRY on the inside.
     
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  5. Chuck the Canuck

    Chuck the Canuck
    Feeling the Heat 2.
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    Oct 10, 2012
    400
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    Loc:
    Keswick Ridge, New Brunswick, Canada
    Mad Mark Said:


    I walked mine up these blocks 1 side at a time the way Highbeam said.

    Took 1 hour and did it myself with the door off, bricks in.
    _______________________________________________________

    Hey Mad Mark, that's a Jim-Dandy set-up you got there! Love it. I think I'd like to do that with my stove; sure would beat the heck out of getting down on hands and knees all the time to load 'er up....
     
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  6. Chuck the Canuck

    Chuck the Canuck
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 10, 2012
    400
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    Loc:
    Keswick Ridge, New Brunswick, Canada
    That's an awesome looking stove/shop/floor; the whole set up of your shop is just plain perfect, homey and inviting......
     
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  7. wooduser

    wooduser
    Minister of Fire 2.
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    Nov 12, 2018
    680
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    Loc:
    seattle, wa
    Here's the problem ----

    As I said in an earlier post, the wood you burn is MORE IMPORTANT than the stove you burn it in. You've spent a lot of time and money to investigate and install a stove, but have you spent comparable time and money to insure that your wood supply is up to snuff, meaning dry enough to burn properly?

    Based on your comment above, the answer is, "no." You are guessing and supposing that 18 months will have the wood dry enough to burn properly. Intuitively, that seems reasonable, but it's really just a guess on your part.

    Others are suggesting that if you are going to rely on guessing and supposing, you should guess that drying oak for three years will do the job adequately.

    But the way to resolve the issue without guessing is to get and use a moisture meter so that you are measuring rather than guessing. Your guess has been contradicted by several other people who warn that you may well be wrong ----isn't the smart move to make the small investment in a moisture meter so that you will know for sure?

    How would you feel if you go with your current plans but discover next winter that the wood barely burns in your new stove? If that happens, you are stuck, like too many other people with new stoves that we see here.

    Furthermore, you may discover that not only do you need to have your wood supply for 2019-2020 in hand, but also for 2020-2021 and 2021-2022 as well.

    These are the realities of heating with wood. Guessing and supposing are not adequate substitutes for measuring and knowing. If you were to discover, now, that your wood isn't as dry as you'd hoped, you still have a Texas summer to help dry it out, and you could find advice on how to deal with that problem now. But if you discover that next winter, you are stuck.

    In short, you might be wrong. Find out now and know for sure!
     
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  8. WinterinWI

    WinterinWI
    Member 2.
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    Dec 6, 2018
    76
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    Loc:
    Wisconsin
    Cut split and stacked outside in Texas for 18 months may be ok. No doubt one of the better climates for seasoning wood in the US.

    How many days per year do you need to fire up the stove? 2 or 3?

    Sorry, couldn't help myself.
     
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  9. wooduser

    wooduser
    Minister of Fire 2.
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    Nov 12, 2018
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    Loc:
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    True, no doubt.
     
  10. Mikelly

    Mikelly
    New Member 2.
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    Feb 26, 2019
    10
    2
    Loc:
    East Texas
    A moisture meter sounds like real good advice. I'll look for 20% or lower.
    Thanks.
     
  11. kborndale

    kborndale
    Burning Hunk 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 9, 2008
    151
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    Loc:
    LI
    When you get one, remember that to get an true reading you need the wood to be at about 70 degrees and you have to split a piece and test the freshly split side.
     
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  12. Woody5506

    Woody5506
    Minister of Fire 2.
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    Feb 14, 2017
    693
    351
    Loc:
    Rochester NY
    Regardless of the oak, just keep splitting and stacking wood now. There are other species of wood that will likely season fine if you were to split them now and burn next winter. Either way, you won't regret having "too much" wood when it comes time to use it.
     
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