How do you bring in firewood?

ct01r

New Member
Nov 10, 2018
70
Eastern Pa.
We usually only burn for a few days at a time when the temp's are single digit, so I just use a wheel barrow and stack the wood on the outside basement steps. One wheelbarrow is about 24 hours worth so it works fine.

I use the skid loader to move freshly cut trees from the cutting site to the barn, though; a lot fewer trips ( and easier to load) than the pickup.
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
15,579
Philadelphia
Getting it to the house from the wood lot:



Then from the wagon to the stoves, I use a pair of something like this, but a different brand:

Amazon product
 
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MissMac

Minister of Fire
Dec 4, 2017
579
NW Ontario
Load up a little plastic sled and pull it across the yard through the snow. Pretty easy!
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
3,763
NE PA
Gorilla Cart; Fits right through the door, loads a wood rack next to stove full. Before storms, I bring a full cart in so I don't need to be concerned about getting more in for a while.

IMG_0411.jpg IMG_0412 2.jpg
 
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JRHAWK9

Minister of Fire
Jan 8, 2014
1,358
Wisconsin Dells, WI
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weatherguy

Minister of Fire
Feb 20, 2009
5,727
Central Mass

sloeffle

Minister of Fire
Mar 1, 2012
668
Central Ohio
 

Sawset

Minister of Fire
Feb 14, 2015
832
Palmyra, WI
23in X 3ft long x 3tall cart
Width is same as the stove capacity, so if it fits, it can come in.
Holds enough to last 3days if it's below zero, or a week or more if mild out.
Casters underneath, roll it to the garage door. Wood is stored in the garage, or out the door behind under a lean to.
Wheel barrow to move it around out there.
1-1/2 conduit in the garage pinned to the ceiling and floor. Shove the conduits up and remove for summer storage of equipment.
Fence wire midway up to cinch in and keep from bowing out. Holds about 3 cord.
 

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CincyBurner

Feeling the Heat
Mar 10, 2015
452
SW Ohio
+1 on the plastic hunting sled. A great X-mas present from my wife years ago !
Once it's wood burning season I try to time restocking wood from back yard wood racks to front and back porches (~1 cord) with snow cover. It makes moving wood so much easier.
SW Ohio usually not so brutal that we can't get to the wood racks because of deep snow.
Otherwise if no snow, use wheel barrow and try to time it when ground frozen solid to avoid trashing the lawn.
 

weatherguy

Minister of Fire
Feb 20, 2009
5,727
Central Mass
23in X 3ft long x 3tall cart
Width is same as the stove capacity, so if it fits, it can come in.
Holds enough to last 3days if it's below zero, or a week or more if mild out.
Casters underneath, roll it to the garage door. Wood is stored in the garage, or out the door behind under a lean to.
Wheel barrow to move it around out there.
1-1/2 conduit in the garage pinned to the ceiling and floor. Shove the conduits up and remove for summer storage of equipment.
Fence wire midway up to cinch in and keep from bowing out. Holds about 3 cord.
Love that cart, been meaning to make something similar when I get some free time. I can cut some time off by loading onto said cart and parking next to the stove.,
 
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Gearhead660

Member
Dec 20, 2018
227
WI
Getting it to the house from the wood lot:



Then from the wagon to the stoves, I use a pair of something like this, but a different brand:

Amazon product
I like the over sized Radio Flyer wagon. Where did you get it?
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
15,579
Philadelphia
I have mad respect for anyone that can maneuver an articulated trailer.
I can do a slalom course in reverse with a boat trailer, but yeah... this thing is a little tougher with the additional articulation point. I have an unforgiving 6-inch window to hit, in order to make the hard turn around a short stone wall into the final parking spot, so it often takes me more than one attempt.


I like the over sized Radio Flyer wagon. Where did you get it?

I added a log splitter SCV and a hydraulic cylinder to give it dump capability, as I use it to move 50+ yards of mulch each spring.

 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
3,889
Downeast Maine
I can do a slalom course in reverse with a boat trailer, but yeah... this thing is a little tougher with the additional articulation point. I have an unforgiving 6-inch window to hit, in order to make the hard turn around a short stone wall into the final parking spot, so it often takes me more than one attempt.





I added a log splitter SCV and a hydraulic cylinder to give it dump capability, as I use it to move 50+ yards of mulch each spring.

The dump capability is really nice. I could use that for moving the literal tons of boulders we have everywhere.
 
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Gearhead660

Member
Dec 20, 2018
227
WI
I have a "wood wagon" that is just an old trailer that i put sides and a roof on. Basically a mobile wood shed. Fill it full of wood and park next to house. Made a shute to send wood into large box in basement through window. Need to refill box roughly once a week during cold weather.
 

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Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
15,579
Philadelphia
The dump capability is really nice. I could use that for moving the literal tons of boulders we have everywhere.
A few years ago, I put in a new garden that was just over 1/4 acre, and that pushed my mulch purchase for that year from the usual 50 yards up to 110 yards. Preparing for that was when I decided to add the hydraulic dump, as I wanted to get all 110 yards moved in just one weekend by myself. It worked, but they were some long days, and I was mighty sore from raking and shoveling mulch. Now that I have a good base down in that garden, I'm back down to my usual 50'ish yards per year, so the dump function of the wagon doesn't get a ton of use anymore.

However, I just bought new fittings for it today, while at the hydraulics shop. Old tractor used 3/8" quick disconnect fittings, new tractor is all 1/2". Also got a hydraulic top link rigged up, so I can now tilt my 3-point forks up and down for moving things like wood sheds. But now, who knows? I might be moving wood on pallets, someday.
 

Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
12,100
Southern IN
I bring it with the quad/trailer from the stacks to a couple staging stacks by the door. Then it's usually a canvas tote to haul it inside to a hoop next to the stove. Or sometimes I get annoyed with having to make several trips with the tote to fill the hoop, and just fill the yard cart.
20191206_162742.jpg
 
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SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
3,889
Downeast Maine
A few years ago, I put in a new garden that was just over 1/4 acre, and that pushed my mulch purchase for that year from the usual 50 yards up to 110 yards. Preparing for that was when I decided to add the hydraulic dump, as I wanted to get all 110 yards moved in just one weekend by myself. It worked, but they were some long days, and I was mighty sore from raking and shoveling mulch. Now that I have a good base down in that garden, I'm back down to my usual 50'ish yards per year, so the dump function of the wagon doesn't get a ton of use anymore.

However, I just bought new fittings for it today, while at the hydraulics shop. Old tractor used 3/8" quick disconnect fittings, new tractor is all 1/2". Also got a hydraulic top link rigged up, so I can now tilt my 3-point forks up and down for moving things like wood sheds. But now, who knows? I might be moving wood on pallets, someday.
I really want a hydro top link, and a fasse valve, but it will have to wait. Do you find the rear forks more useful than having them on the front? I mainly want the hydro top link for my grading blade.
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
15,579
Philadelphia
I really want a hydro top link, and a fasse valve, but it will have to wait. Do you find the rear forks more useful than having them on the front? I mainly want the hydro top link for my grading blade.
Forks on the front can be very useful, if your machine is large enough. But my old machine could only lift 700 lb. at the bucket edge, where forks would mount (that machine was not quick-attach), so it was a little too small for that to be a real option when I was shopping for forks to move some machines. So I went with the 3-point version. If I were buying new for the Deere 3R I have now, it'd be a tougher decision.

I think you said your machine was somewhere in the 40 hp class? That would be heavy enough to get some real use out of loader-mounted forks, but you'll still always be able to lift more on the 3-point.

The hydraulic top link is slick! Total investment was only $300.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
3,889
Downeast Maine
Forks on the front can be very useful, if your machine is large enough. But my old machine could only lift 700 lb. at the bucket edge, where forks would mount (that machine was not quick-attach), so it was a little too small for that to be a real option when I was shopping for forks to move some machines. So I went with the 3-point version. If I were buying new for the Deere 3R I have now, it'd be a tougher decision.

I think you said your machine was somewhere in the 40 hp class? That would be heavy enough to get some real use out of loader-mounted forks, but you'll still always be able to lift more on the 3-point.

The hydraulic top link is slick! Total investment was only $300.
My machine is about 3500 lbs without the loader, and yes 45 HP (claimed anyway). The lift arms are rated at over a ton, but I bet they can lift significantly more. When I took delivery of my chipper shredder the 3pt hitch was vacant and I found myself driving a tripod. With the stump grinder on the back I can use the full potential of the loader.

Anyways, to get back on topic I move splits to the stacking area with the loader and bucket. To move seasoned wood inside I use a wheel barrow to get the splits to the door and woven polyethylene Ikea bags to bring the wood to the indoor rack. The bags keep a lot of dirt off the floor and I know how many "bags" the racks will hold. I was using a sling type firewood carrier, but that was too messy for me.
 
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Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
12,100
Southern IN
I move splits to the stacking area with the loader and bucket. To move seasoned wood inside I use a wheel barrow to get the splits to the door and woven polyethylene Ikea bags to bring the wood to the indoor rack. The bags keep a lot of dirt off the floor and I know how many "bags" the racks will hold. I was using a sling type firewood carrier, but that was too messy for me.
"Sling bag"...like a canvas tote? They pretty much contain the mess, then after I unload it into the hoop I carefully fold it back up so the crumbs are contained inside, and put it away. I don't clean it out every time.
With the dead wood I get, especially Red Oak with half-crumbled off rotted sapwood, you're gonna have some bit of mess around the stove area.
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
15,579
Philadelphia
"Sling bag"...like a canvas tote? They pretty much contain the mess, then after I unload it into the hoop I carefully fold it back up so the crumbs are contained inside, and put it away. I don't clean it out every time.
With the dead wood I get, especially Red Oak with half-crumbled off rotted sapwood, you're gonna have some bit of mess around the stove area.
Ditto. I use a pair of canvas tote/sling, five or six splits in each one per stove to stay balanced, and just fold them up with the mess inside after I load. When I use them again in 12 hours, I shake the mess out of them outdoors.
 

Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
12,100
Southern IN
Ditto. I use a pair of canvas tote/sling, five or six splits in each one per stove to stay balanced
Hmmm, I've carried one, with one hand, and can load it pretty full. If I use two, that would probably be more wood than a single one, heaped way full like I've been doing. Might keep me from using the yard cart when I get POed at the short loads, having to clean the wheels first, and having the wife frown at me. ;lol I won't have a free hand to open the door, but I guess I can figure that out...