How do you bring in firewood?

MissMac

Minister of Fire
Dec 4, 2017
541
NW Ontario

mar13

Member
Nov 5, 2018
248
Humboldt coast, California
5 gallon buckets, but considering getting a sling. If the buckets get muddy from setting down on the dirt, they're easy to wipe clean.
 

weatherguy

Minister of Fire
Feb 20, 2009
5,660
Central Mass
5 gallon buckets, but considering getting a sling. If the buckets get muddy from setting down on the dirt, they're easy to wipe clean.
That's a good idea, I've been using one of those LL bean bags but the bucket may be easier to carry.
 

CincyBurner

Feeling the Heat
Mar 10, 2015
441
SW Ohio
If you need to carry wood inside this log tote from Lehman's is great. https://www.lehmans.com/product/closed-end-log-totes-large/
I bought it over 10+ years ago when I started wood burning and it's still going strong. Very durable. It shows almost no signs of wear. Large capacity and material is thick enough so that it stays open when loading. The closed ends keep small wood debris from falling out.
I have a sling too. It's better because with a sling you can't set down and pick up again with one hand.
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
15,411
Philadelphia
5 gallon buckets, but considering getting a sling. If the buckets get muddy from setting down on the dirt, they're easy to wipe clean.
I’d think buckets would be tough to fill, given they’re not very forgiving. Totes just conform to the shape of whatever you put in them.

I have a low stone wall adjacent to my storage, where I lay out my totes for filling. But if I didn’t, I‘d probably just build or repurpose a picnic table for that use.

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mar13

Member
Nov 5, 2018
248
Humboldt coast, California
I’d think buckets would be tough to fill, given they’re not very forgiving. Totes just conform to the shape of whatever you put in them.

I have a low stone wall adjacent to my storage, where I lay out my totes for filling. But if I didn’t, I‘d probably just build or repurpose a picnic table for that use.
I agree, and that's why I'm thinking of moving to totes. Just a couple of large splits can fill a rigid shaped 5 gallon bucket and then you're left trying to squeeze small splits into the remaining space.

My only hesitation about totes is that I imagine you have to set the tote on the ground to fill it, which gets it dirty, and then you have to set the tote down on the carpet/hearth inside the house where it can get things dirty. I usually fill one bucket while holding it off the ground, place it on some clean cement, then fill the second bucket.

I guess I should just try it myself. $14 isn't much to gamble.
(tote on Amazon)

Edit: just ordered a MossyOak tote for only $10


(I just re-read @Ashful comment, and yes, a small table or platform would solve my worry.)
 
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RandyBoBandy

Minister of Fire
Feb 25, 2015
1,034
Whitmore lake, MI
I agree, and that's why I'm thinking of moving to totes. Just a couple of large splits can fill a rigid shaped 5 gallon bucket and then you're left trying to squeeze small splits into the remaining space.

My only hesitation about totes is that I imagine you have to set the tote on the ground to fill it, which gets it dirty, and then you have to set the tote down on the carpet/hearth inside the house where it can get things dirty. I usually fill one bucket while holding it off the ground, place it on some clean cement, then fill the second bucket.

I guess I should just try it myself. $14 isn't much to gamble.
(tote on Amazon)

Edit: just ordered a MossyOak tote for only $10


(I just re-read @Ashful comment, and yes, a small table or platform would solve my worry.)
I will often hang one handle of my tote from a longer split in the stack and hold the other handle while I fill the tote. I’m only working with one tote so I don’t have the problem of finding a clean spot on the floor. I keep about a face cord in the garage so I also don’t have to set anything down on the ground.
 

billb3

Minister of Fire
Dec 14, 2007
4,667
SE Mass
milk crates

We have a plastic shed (originally held garbage barrels) by the back door on the patio for pine splits and a wood shed (oversized dog house) for hardwood splits next to that. Both sheds disappear for the Summer. and a table and chairs take their place.
Usually have two milk crates of pine and two milk crates of hardwood by the stove. There's about a week's worth of wood in the sheds by the door that I'll refill as needed and as the weather allows. They get filled by tractor bucket or wheel barrow. Each shed will take three trips with a wheel barrow to the stacks .
 
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Derrinx

New Member
Jan 13, 2020
10
NYS
A lot of envious setups here!

This is my current preferred method. On a day what I definitely pushed the trailers limits with red oak. I also have a 35 horse diesel compact tractor but it's usually too swampy in my wood lots to take that in
 

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Buzzsawboy

New Member
Nov 25, 2018
15
Central Michigan
Working on my install currently. I'm going to be a first time wood burner and I'm trying to do a nice ergonomicall design. My wall that my fireplace is in butts up to my garage. I ordered a fire rated access door that will open up into the bottom of a base cabinet beside my fireplace. No carrying wood through the house. I'll take more pictures once everything is done and installed in the next few weeks.
 

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Indiana wood

Member
Nov 30, 2019
131
Warsaw Indiana
Working on my install currently. I'm going to be a first time wood burner and I'm trying to do a nice ergonomicall design. My wall that my fireplace is in butts up to my garage. I ordered a fire rated access door that will open up into the bottom of a base cabinet beside my fireplace. No carrying wood through the house. I'll take more pictures once everything is done and installed in the next few weeks.
Fireplace pic?
 

Buzzsawboy

New Member
Nov 25, 2018
15
Central Michigan
Fireplace pic?
It's a work in progress. My base cabinets shipt out yesterday, I built the book cases for on top. The left base cabinet will be wood storage and the right base cabinet will have out media like dvd players and such. I reworked the brick and narrowed it up a foot on each side, added the barn beam mantle and drywall work above. The brick is getting stacked stone in front of it after my new insert (Lopi Medium Flush Hybrid Fyre) installed next month. Everything should be done February 12th. The bottom pic is out inspiration photo of what it will look very close to.
 

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Indiana wood

Member
Nov 30, 2019
131
Warsaw Indiana
It's a work in progress. My base cabinets shipt out yesterday, I built the book cases for on top. The left base cabinet will be wood storage and the right base cabinet will have out media like dvd players and such. I reworked the brick and narrowed it up a foot on each side, added the barn beam mantle and drywall work above. The brick is getting stacked stone in front of it after my new insert (Lopi Medium Flush Hybrid Fyre) installed next month. Everything should be done February 12th. The bottom pic is out inspiration photo of what it will look very close to.
Very nice. We considered something similar but my boss also said no to wood in main living area.
SO a man cave it was. Blaze king king in basement
 

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Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
15,411
Philadelphia
Working on my install currently. I'm going to be a first time wood burner and I'm trying to do a nice ergonomicall design. My wall that my fireplace is in butts up to my garage. I ordered a fire rated access door that will open up into the bottom of a base cabinet beside my fireplace. No carrying wood through the house. I'll take more pictures once everything is done and installed in the next few weeks.
That’s a very nice way to go, for an ambiance burner, but it’s going to be slow and tedious if you’re burning in the scale of a full-time heater. It’s much quicker to haul three loads per day right to the stove in a pair of satchels, but this system could work great if only doing it a few times per week.

I hear so many new burners post concerns about dirt from wood hauling thru the house, but it’s really a non-issue for me. My wood is hauled in totes, no dirt escapes. The few crumbs that end up on the hearth when loading are swept up with a dust pan and brush I keep next to each stove, and tossed into the stove. No fuss, no muss.
 

wooddope

Member
Mar 16, 2010
165
southern nh
Wheelbarrow from stacks and dump into basement bulkhead. Stack into basement against wall roughly a cord a few feet from furnace. Once snow is forecast bring in additional cord in basement and stack 1/2 cord into bulkhead. Having dry fuel at hand regardless of outside conditions is priceless. Depending on how cold the weather is this will provide about 1/2 the seasons fuel.
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
15,411
Philadelphia
I know some of you guys live in places that are often much colder than our record lows, we only see zero dF a few evenings per year, but I still like going out to the porch to grab my firewood. In addition to keeping all the bugs outdoors, it gives me a chance to look at the sky and feel the weather before each load. I don’t smoke, so what other incentive do I have to go out and look up at the stars on a clear and cold Tuesday night around 11pm?
 
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robj80

New Member
Oct 5, 2018
92
Oxford, CT
My stack is top covered on a concrete wall in the driveway. When I know I am going to have a fire I grab my kids red plastic wagon and load it up them pull it into the garage. The garage stays about 50 degrees and this is much better than opening and closing an outside door when I need to grab some wood.
 

twd000

Feeling the Heat
Aug 28, 2015
395
Southern New Hampshire
I use a DR PowerWagon to bring splits onto my screened porch. I built a ramp to let me drive up three steps onto the porch. Then I use a canvas tote to bring in ~5 days of wood into my indoor rack which sits by the stove so we can reload without going back outside.
 

Dabster13

New Member
Nov 27, 2018
36
CT
man it looks like you've got some big rounds in there that aren't split - are those actually dry enough to burn?
I use the occasional big round like that as well, but i'll stick it next to my stove for 3-4 days so the ends actually read 0% on the moisture meter. Is it all perfectly dry? Probably not but when i use them for overnight burns they are gone in the morning, so they are burning just fine.