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chanman7861

New Member
Feb 20, 2020
4
Ohio
I know it’s Country Flame. Cannot find an exact model number anywhere. Have been directed to this site.
I’ve been running it the last month and a half and has worked well for my 2,000 sq ft home. I’d just like to find out how I could run it more efficiently. Also if anyone has this same stove, could I replace the door with a single glass door instead of two separate doors?
 

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Are you using any kind of blower?

Do you know how it is connected to chimney, Insert outlet size and liner?

Those two things will make it much more efficient.
 
I would remove the log rack most inserts do not recommend them.
 
Are you using any kind of blower?

Do you know how it is connected to chimney, Insert outlet size and liner?

Those two things will make it much more efficient.
Yes there is a blower within. I had to replace the switch to get it working again.
I think it’s an 8” flu. There’s a chimney liner. I swept it out and cleaned it pretty good. I used a drill wire brush attachment on the inside to remove creosote. Hopefully I didn’t damage anything. Just scratches.
 
Only open fireplaces elevate fire to allow more air under logs to burn faster, heating mass of hearth with less smoke. In a controlled air stove always burn on an inch of ash to slow the fire. You will end up with coals in the back with charcoal that has a very low ignition temperature. Remove a little ash each morning from the front, rake ahead coals and charcoal with a little ash to build the new fire on. It should take right off. This way you Never have to let it go out to remove ash.
Most stoves will line with firebrick on the sides. Look for any brackets that would hold them to the sides. They set upright and usually go in first so the bottom layer holds them tight to the sides. The reason is to reflect heat back into the firebox instead of absorbing so much. The hotter the firebox, the cleaner the fire and more smoke particles are burned in the stove. It protects the steel side plates from warping as well.

Does this have any kind of baffle, or can you see right up the outlet from inside?
 
Only open fireplaces elevate fire to allow more air under logs to burn faster, heating mass of hearth with less smoke. In a controlled air stove always burn on an inch of ash to slow the fire. You will end up with coals in the back with charcoal that has a very low ignition temperature. Remove a little ash each morning from the front, rake ahead coals and charcoal with a little ash to build the new fire on. It should take right off. This way you Never have to let it go out to remove ash.
Most stoves will line with firebrick on the sides. Look for any brackets that would hold them to the sides. They set upright and usually go in first so the bottom layer holds them tight to the sides. The reason is to reflect heat back into the firebox instead of absorbing so much. The hotter the firebox, the cleaner the fire and more smoke particles are burned in the stove. It protects the steel side plates from warping as well.

Does this have any kind of baffle, or can you see right up the outlet from inside?
I have been trying to find a way to secure the bricks to the sides of the stove, I see it being a hassle without them. Waiting until spring time to get firebricks to cut to size. Stove is pretty old from what info I’ve managed to find about this insert and I’m not sure if they still produce parts.

There is indeed a baffle in the back, looks like a magazine rack that is hanging down. Might be a little warped.
One thing I’d like to do is replace the windows from 2 separate, to 1 full glass door. I’ve seen other versions of this stove and they look to have the same style front. Been meaning to try and get dimensions and maybe seeing if I could replace the doors.
 
Brick retainers. Normally angle iron 1 1/2 X 1 1/2 was welded to the walls. First they were short pieces called brick clips, about 2 inches long welded at each brick joint in the early Fishers. Later, they used angle iron the entire length.

Stove bricks are installed rear wall first, sides, front, bottom.

Here's how I brick a stove with missing clips;
Set the bricks against rear wall first, lengthwise - upright. Then against side walls starting at rear, so the rear most side bricks are holding the rear wall end bricks in the corners. Cut the last sidewall front brick to size to fit into front corner. Do not cut and install front wall brick. Then fill in the bottom to hold tight. Start at rear with full bricks, cutting the last row across the front to fit. Leave the front bottom corner open to fit front brick against front wall. The inside must be super clean to fit brick. Absolutely no ash, brick grit, nothing between bricks. I wipe with damp cloth to remove any trace of anything. Don't worry about spaces, it will fill in with ash and pack solid. Measure the entire length for angle iron you need across the back. Cut slightly shorter to allow for lengthwise growth when hot. Set on top of rear bricks with angle facing down to hold bricks in place. Cut angle to length for sides. Set the side pieces of angle on top of the bricks facing down. The side angle holds the back against the rear, so now you only need to prevent the side angle from coming away from the side wall. Mark where side angle will be on rear angle iron. Drill hole at angle iron end, so a carriage bolt inserted from back sticks through as a stop to prevent side angle from crashing inward. It doesn't need to be threaded or nutted. It is just a pin facing forward that holds side angle against side wall. I find 1/4 inch burns and rusts away, 3/8 or 1/2 bolt is fine. Now you only need to hold the side angle iron length against the side at front. The front will not have brick yet, so cut a brick to fit between door frame and side wall. When stood up and pushed down into the opening on floor of stove, this holds the side angle against wall. Since this front brick is not touched by loading, it will stay vertical without a problem holding the side tight. If you have to notch or angle brick for good fit they cut easily.

If you have a torch that heats steel red enough to make an easy bend, you can bend the rear angle iron retainer at the ends on a 90* angle to make corner stops instead of using bolts as stops. (If you have torch, cut the rear angle iron longer to bend the vertical iron inward on a 90* angle to hold side angle tight against sides)

Cutting is very easy. Score about 1/8 inch deep or more with a masonry blade in circular saw or score with cut off wheel. They snap clean easily.

I doubt if the larger single door would fit the same size opening. Your double door opening is probably larger. Where does your air wash come from? Would it wash across the one piece glass?
 
If the stove has no indication of retainers for side wall brick it may be the way it was designed. Just a thought.
I don't think I would sweat trying to change out the 2 door setup. Guessing you would spend far more time, effort and maybe money than it's worth. My opinion.
Enjoy it as is until you decide to upgrade to a modern efficient unit.