Ideas for mobile home wood stove install

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jb59

New Member
Jan 8, 2016
7
Idaho
We have an older single wide with the bowed type metal roof and need to install a wood stove. Has anyone done one of these? I have looked and looked but can't seem to find specific info. for doing this. The ceiling inside is flat and where I want to put the stove, near the center of the living room, the roof above is apprx 18'' at its highest point and then tapers either direction from center. What would be the best way to support the chimney pipe? Ceiling support box?? Any idea what type of framing these mobiles have and HOW do you access the space to do the actual reinforcing? Some have told me that the roof trusses are a joke ( 1x2) Any info. would be appreciated as it looks like I will be doing this myself as we are up in the mountains in Idaho. Have tried hiring pros but no follow through. I will also order parts online and have delivered so would like to get the right stuff and do it between snow storms. Thanks!!
 

saskwoodburner

Feeling the Heat
Nov 18, 2014
479
Saskatchewan, Canada
I did an install for myself last year on my old mobile home probably somewhat similar to yours. I'll try to recall as much as I can for you, if it helps.

You mention the center of the roof is about 18" higher than the sides? How wide is your mobile home? 12 or 14 feet? You need that measurement to figure out which roof flashing angle you eventually need. I can't recall at the moment what mine was, but very shallow, like 1/12 (how many inches the roof drops per foot).

The chimney is supported with a ceiling support box, that is screwed into the trusses, so to speak. My chimney has a ring screwed into/around it, and it sits down in the support box. I also scabbed?toenailed? some extra supports into the trusses on 3 sides. It's about as rigid as could be now.

My trusses or rafters (not a carpenter, so forgive the terms if wrong), basically the wood stuff up in the ceiling are 16" on center, the appropriate support box will slide up for a nice fit. My support box is 14" x 14".

There will be an adapter that goes into the bottom of the Class A (silver chimney pipe stuff), and your double wall stove pipe will connect to that. And obviously down to the stove top.

I've got to eat, but I'll come back afterwith more ideas on tools/parts/supports. Maybe a few crude drawings.
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
5,936
07462
Please don't forget the other stuff, Support the floor for the new weight of the stove and hearth (non combustable pad rated for stove) outside air connection (oak) chimney roof support bracket or guy lines for any metal chimney above 5ft, minimum chimney height (depending on stove either 12ft or 15ft
 

jb59

New Member
Jan 8, 2016
7
Idaho
Thank you both for the info. Since there is really no "attic" to access, can a guy properly frame in the ceiling support box from within the small hole you cut in the ceiling or do you have to work from the roof as well? With the roof flashing is there sealers that work better than others. I assume that the edges lay flat on the roof with sealant both below and on top of the flanges?? Any idea if some of the manufacturers of the chimney parts are interchangeable ? Dura-vent looks to twist lock together like metalbestos?? Yes, I already have the stove, the hearth pad, outside air kit, and the chimney pipe (metalbestos) my plan is double wall pipe inside to ceiling support box, attic insulation shield between ceiling and roof, and supported chimney pipe. For the stove pipe is it a good idea to buy a telescoping one to make the connection or how else would you get the pipe in place? Thanks again.
 

saskwoodburner

Feeling the Heat
Nov 18, 2014
479
Saskatchewan, Canada
I thought I had a picture play by play of the install, but I guess not. Going up through the ceiling, I encounter this. Ceiling tile, plastic, waxy cardboard type paper, pink insulation, maybe waxy cardboard again, and then some 1/2 or heavier fiber type board, and then the roof tin.

Now again, your trailer may be different, but this is what I encountered going up through the ceiling on my shack.

The parts you need will depend on the brand of pipe/support box. There are kits available, and they should have almost everything you need.
 

saskwoodburner

Feeling the Heat
Nov 18, 2014
479
Saskatchewan, Canada
Thank you both for the info. Since there is really no "attic" to access, can a guy properly frame in the ceiling support box from within the small hole you cut in the ceiling or do you have to work from the roof as well? With the roof flashing is there sealers that work better than others. I assume that the edges lay flat on the roof with sealant both below and on top of the flanges?? Any idea if some of the manufacturers of the chimney parts are interchangeable ? Dura-vent looks to twist lock together like metalbestos?? Yes, I already have the stove, the hearth pad, outside air kit, and the chimney pipe (metalbestos) my plan is double wall pipe inside to ceiling support box, attic insulation shield between ceiling and roof, and supported chimney pipe. For the stove pipe is it a good idea to buy a telescoping one to make the connection or how else would you get the pipe in place? Thanks again.

My installation was close to the wall, so my "frame in" would be different than yours. I had to go from above to get my pieces to fit.

I used a few machine screws to help with the flashing, and that red high temp sealant between the roof and flashing if I recall.

Double wall pipe (telescoping) is what I have coming off the stove.
 

jb59

New Member
Jan 8, 2016
7
Idaho
Sorry for the delay....propane water heater went out and have been scrambling to get it going. Actually ordered some of the parts that I am going to need on Amazon today, they were alot cheaper there than anywhere else. Didn't have everything but a good start. I already have the metalbestos 8 inch chimney pipe, like 13'. NOW, the wife wants me to design some cool looking pad to set the stove on. Thinking cement board with tile. My plan now is to cut out a large enough square portion of the ceiling for access to install support box and reinforce it properly and then reinstall that piece with metal flashing painted black to cover the seam. After looking at different stoves we decided on a BlazeKing King Classic. Hope it is 1/2 of what they say it is!. LOL We are in the mountains in Idaho not far from Canada and it gets COLD here and the old trailer isn't exactly EnergyStar certified. LOL
 

firefighterjake

Minister of Fire
Jul 22, 2008
19,407
Unity/Bangor, Maine
Whatever stove you go with . . . be sure to read up on what it requires for the hearth you plan to build. Some stoves have simple ember protection (technically a piece of sheet metal would work for the hearth), while others have strict R-value (insulation) requirements which may require air gaps, Micore, multiple layers of cement board, etc.
 

jb59

New Member
Jan 8, 2016
7
Idaho
I was surprised when doing my reading on this stove how close some of the clearances are. The hearth pad as you said is really only required to be an ember shield with only 2" on each side and most of the pad out front to cover the door swing. I plan on making it larger in all directions than is required as I think it will look better as well. This is for a new blaze king. A friend has an older stove blaze king and he had to build his up.
 

jb59

New Member
Jan 8, 2016
7
Idaho
That is the one I was going to go with, the Princess. I already have 14' of 8 inch triple wall chimney pipe and the flashing and collar to go along with that. When I priced the Princess and the King there was not much difference and the King already had the fan kit included, so went for the King. I calculated my btu requirements, all things considered, and the numbers fell into place. We have 1200 sq. ft. poorly insulated and live in a very cold region, it was -2 degrees yesterday morn and have about 2-3 feet of snow outside. I hear it is not unusual for us to be "snowbound" for periods of time up here. Will take a little time to get it installed as I am searching for the other components on line. Still wondering what I will find above ceiling to attach ceiling support box to?? 1x2 rafters is what I am told.
 

Rickb

Minister of Fire
Oct 24, 2012
1,139
St.Louis
Triple wall chimney pipe is usually used for fireplaces. Make sure yours is class A pipe or don't use it with a stove.
 

saskwoodburner

Feeling the Heat
Nov 18, 2014
479
Saskatchewan, Canada
Still wondering what I will find above ceiling to attach ceiling support box to?? 1x2 rafters is what I am told.

Hard to say until you get up in there. Like I mentioned earlier in the thread, that's what I have running up in the ceiling. They are attached with a chinsy wood support between them every so often.

What you'll need to do is beef up the area around the support box with 2x4's on each of the 4 sides. Two of them will run with the rafters (the longer the better within reason, to spread the load?), and two between. Sorry if I'm not clear, my gift for describing is somewhat lacking.

I'll send a quick sketch of what I did, see if you can understand my madness.
 

saskwoodburner

Feeling the Heat
Nov 18, 2014
479
Saskatchewan, Canada
image.jpg
image.jpg


This make any sense to you? Mine is close to the wall, so obviously the supports or braces would not be angled so extreme if the stove was further from the wall.
 

jb59

New Member
Jan 8, 2016
7
Idaho
yes, thanks. how much pipe do you have that this is supporting? I hope what I find up there is still in decent shape, 1x2's this makes me nervous. LOL
is there 8" round stainless stove pipe that twist locks for fireplaces? how would i tell the difference as these are used, they were on a woodstove so no more labels.
 

saskwoodburner

Feeling the Heat
Nov 18, 2014
479
Saskatchewan, Canada
My total stove top to chimney cap is 10 feet I think. I'm a few inches past the 3 foot above roof line minimum requirement. It runs a lot better than you'd think it would, although sluggish in warm weather.

So in theory, only 4-5 feet is supported by the box itself. But then it's sitting on top of the double wall pipe, which is sitting on the stove, so the support isn't truly supporting all the weight.

If you're going 5 feet or higher above the roof, you'll need those supports that have legs and feet to stabilize the chimney. Depends how handy you are, you could fabricate some kind of metal brackets (spanning across the roof), and they would take up the load bearing I would guess?
 
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