Jotul F500 V3 Oslo, I pulled the trigger.

Amigo Azul

Member
Jan 15, 2020
44
Saranac Inn
I don't know what I like more about the photo, the dogs or the stove! I also love that brick hearth; my wife and I want to build one out of the bricks from an old chimney we had to take down. Looks nice and cozy. How long does that Oslo burn for you?
Thanks I like them and it too. Not sure on burn time yet as I am on the last break in fire this morning. Once I get past the break in I'll have updates on burn times.
 

Amigo Azul

Member
Jan 15, 2020
44
Saranac Inn

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
83,758
South Puget Sound, WA
Will you be doing a 500+º load today to bake in the paint?
 
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Amigo Azul

Member
Jan 15, 2020
44
Saranac Inn
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Amigo Azul

Member
Jan 15, 2020
44
Saranac Inn
What else do you do on a Friday after getting 20” of snow? You hang with the pack in front of the new stove.
 

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Amigo Azul

Member
Jan 15, 2020
44
Saranac Inn
I can say that I would recommend this stove. My take after reading everything I could on the previous version of the F500 and what little I could find on the V3 is it behaves the same. I would also recommend that you read the manual and watch the Jotul factory videos for the V3. My setup is what was recommended by Jotul factory support. I have 12’ of double wall Selkirk Ultra Temp with an additional 5’ of double wall stove pipe. The chimney is 6’ above the roof ridge and I more than exceed the 10 2 3 rule and the draft produced is more than enough for this stove where I live. Your mileage may vary as everybody’s setup and location are different.

So far I can say the burn time is fantastic. With 3 splits of beech of 5 to 6” it’ll burn for 5 hours on medium high. It burns throughly with minimal coal left and just fluffy ash.
 

Tahoe

New Member
Oct 8, 2019
59
Tahoe
I can say that I would recommend this stove. My take after reading everything I could on the previous version of the F500 and what little I could find on the V3 is it behaves the same. I would also recommend that you read the manual and watch the Jotul factory videos for the V3. My setup is what was recommended by Jotul factory support. I have 12’ of double wall Selkirk Ultra Temp with an additional 5’ of double wall stove pipe. The chimney is 6’ above the roof ridge and I more than exceed the 10 2 3 rule and the draft produced is more than enough for this stove where I live. Your mileage may vary as everybody’s setup and location are different.

So far I can say the burn time is fantastic. With 3 splits of beech of 5 to 6” it’ll burn for 5 hours on medium high. It burns throughly with minimal coal left and just fluffy ash.
Keep the updates coming! Do you think you could get a longer overnight burn out of it?
 
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Amigo Azul

Member
Jan 15, 2020
44
Saranac Inn
Keep the updates coming! Do you think you could get a longer overnight burn out of it?
I just got a full 9 hours last night with a full load of 16” splits of mixed beech and maple. The splits were from 5 to 6” with 6 pieces packed in. The stove was still hot at 200 degrees this morning with coals to start up a fresh fire in seconds. It was -22 this morning and it’s heating the house up quickly. To me that is fantastic! My idea of a burn is from the time the stove is up to temp and adjusted to the time you you add wood on a bed of coals in the morning. So far this stove is working as advertised and I have no complaints.
 

RyanJ

New Member
Feb 9, 2020
2
CT
I just got a full 9 hours last night with a full load of 16” splits of mixed beech and maple. The splits were from 5 to 6” with 6 pieces packed in. The stove was still hot at 200 degrees this morning with coals to start up a fresh fire in seconds. It was -22 this morning and it’s heating the house up quickly. To me that is fantastic! My idea of a burn is from the time the stove is up to temp and adjusted to the time you you add wood on a bed of coals in the morning. So far this stove is working as advertised and I have no complaints.
Hi Amigo, that is a good burn time. I just purchased the F500 V3 about 5 days ago and can't get over a 6 hr burn time on lowest setting. If I pack the box full of 20 inch maple at night 8 hours later there is not enough coals to start a fire, which is a PITA having to start a fire 1 to 2 times a day. I have the 6 inch pipe going into an 8 inch insulated with a total of about 18 feet, I"m thinking I might have too much draft.
 
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Amigo Azul

Member
Jan 15, 2020
44
Saranac Inn
Hi Amigo, that is a good burn time. I just purchased the F500 V3 about 5 days ago and can't get over a 6 hr burn time on lowest setting. If I pack the box full of 20 inch maple at night 8 hours later there is not enough coals to start a fire, which is a PITA having to start a fire 1 to 2 times a day. I have the 6 inch pipe going into an 8 inch insulated with a total of about 18 feet, I"m thinking I might have too much draft.
Congratulations on your new stove and welcome to the tiny club for now.

I picked up some kiln dried from TSC for the break in fires. Once those were done I couldn’t get more than 3 hours out of that stuff, I believe it was too dry. My current supply is at 18 to 20 percent moisture content. Maple is an interesting wood to burn it’s nice and burns well but the burn time is lower and doesn’t coal up like beech. This stove is so good at getting all of the energy out of the wood and just leaving fluffy ash if you don’t feed it. The coals I have in the morning are not a lot, but I can just put some kindling down and some smaller splits and get the fire going again. I’m not sure what your supply is but I have mostly 5” and larger splits at 16” and can just get 6 of them in. What I’ve learned is to pack the big stuff on the bottom with the smaller on top. I then get it going really good with the side door slightly open. I shut the door and leave the primary air open till the secondary fire tubes kick in. From there I adjust the air down to about halfway then after about 10 to 15 minutes the air is set at just a tap open.

Like anything as you watch and learn what the stove and fire are doing the better results you’ll get. I’m sure I’ll keep learning what this stove likes the more I use it. I had to throw out all the tricks and everything I knew about burning in my old VC Resolute. I can’t really comment on your Chimney as I am far from an expert at those things. I'm sure one of the very knowledgeable chimney and manufactures or installers will chime in.

Happy burning and feel free to ask more questions as this is all new.
 

Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
12,160
Southern IN
watch the Jotul factory videos for the V3.
Can you link the videos? A quick look at youtube didn't bring up anything good on the V3..
can't get over a 6 hr burn time on lowest setting....PITA having to start a fire 1 to 2 times a day. I have the 6 inch pipe going into an 8 inch insulated with a total of about 18 feet, I"m thinking I might have too much draft.
That's going into an 8" ID chimney? In that case, draft should be decreased some.
Are you cutting the air fairly aggressively? Once you are seeing the beginnings of secondary burn, cut the air in increments. You want to keep the secondary going, but eventually have the air low, where there's just lazy flame coming off the wood but the secondary is burning strong. You need dry wood for this to work well, though.
Now, I don't know how this stove is designed to burn. Can you cut the air to where the load is smoldering, but the cat is still eating the smoke and you have no smoke out the stack? Or is it pretty much a secondary-burn stove with the cat just there to clean up the burn a bit more?
Is the cat well-protected, or is it pretty easy for the flames of a high fire to hit the cat? There doesn't appear to be a bypass..
 

Amigo Azul

Member
Jan 15, 2020
44
Saranac Inn
Can you link the videos? A quick look at youtube didn't bring up anything good on the V3..
That's going into an 8" ID chimney? In that case, draft should be decreased some.
Are you cutting the air fairly aggressively? Once you are seeing the beginnings of secondary burn, cut the air in increments. You want to keep the secondary going, but eventually have the air low, where there's just lazy flame coming off the wood but the secondary is burning strong. You need dry wood for this to work well, though.
Now, I don't know how this stove is designed to burn. Can you cut the air to where the load is smoldering, but the cat is still eating the smoke and you have no smoke out the stack? Or is it pretty much a secondary-burn stove with the cat just there to clean up the burn a bit more?
Is the cat well-protected, or is it pretty easy for the flames of a high fire to hit the cat? There doesn't appear to be a bypass..
here is the link to the videos. https://www.youtube.com/user/jotulna/videos. I agree they aren't the greatest but some of the older ones still apply.
 
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Amigo Azul

Member
Jan 15, 2020
44
Saranac Inn
I just got back from snowmobiling for 8 hours. Came home to a 70 degree house and a small bed of coals to start a fire. This stove is awesome!
 

mar13

Feeling the Heat
Nov 5, 2018
274
California redwood coast
The stove is on the hearth!

Now I have to extend it out and around as the installers had to go more forward into the room. I knew this was going to happen but wanted to wait till it was here and in its home. I had already purchased some nice 12x24 black marble remnants from my LHS.

I have to wait till the stove gets up to room temp before the first fire as it road in the back of the installers box truck. The suspense is killing me!!

View attachment 256589
I couldn't put in the Oslo due the side load door needing to be locked in a corner install.
Was the corner install an issue for the use of your side load door?
 

Amigo Azul

Member
Jan 15, 2020
44
Saranac Inn
Was the corner install an issue for the use of your side load door?
Part of the reason the stove is further forward is for the side load clearance. I can load from the side with no issues.
 

Amigo Azul

Member
Jan 15, 2020
44
Saranac Inn
-12f below this morning when I got out of bed at 7:00am. The house was 67 degrees and I had a small bed of coals and the stove temp itself was still ~around 150 degrees according to the thermal electric fan on the stove top. I loaded it full at 9:00pm so I think that's a pretty good burn time.

At this moment the stove is 500 degrees and set at low with some big 1/4 splits in the 10" wide range and the house is a nice 75 degrees with an outside temp of 4f above.

Really liking this stove.
 
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Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
12,160
Southern IN
Part of the reason the stove is further forward is for the side load clearance. I can load from the side with no issues.
Although you have less room to work, and you have to eyeball it and think a couple splits ahead to get a full load in, I like side loading. For one thing, if you have a big coal bed, you don't get scorched as quickly as you do with a front-loader. My stove has andirons so no splits can roll against the glass. On the front-loading Ideal Steel, they fold down out of the way for loading..
with some big 1/4 splits in the 10" wide range
_g I might have to squat at the knees to lift and load those, so I didn't hurt my back! ;lol
 
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Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
17,512
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
Glad you knocked down the old masonry chimney. It’s really easy and people suffer with them even though the pipes work better because they think demo is hard.

I replaced a cracked masonry fireplace with a pipe and don’t regret it.
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
83,758
South Puget Sound, WA
I replaced a cracked masonry fireplace with a pipe and don’t regret it.
Likewise. Did this in 2006 and never looked back. The old fireplace and chimney were a fire just waiting to happen.
 

Newburnerwisconsin

Feeling the Heat
Jul 8, 2015
477
wisconsin
-12f below this morning when I got out of bed at 7:00am. The house was 67 degrees and I had a small bed of coals and the stove temp itself was still ~around 150 degrees according to the thermal electric fan on the stove top. I loaded it full at 9:00pm so I think that's a pretty good burn time.

At this moment the stove is 500 degrees and set at low with some big 1/4 splits in the 10" wide range and the house is a nice 75 degrees with an outside temp of 4f above.

Really liking this stove.
How many square feet are you heating with your new stove? Glad to hear you are happy with it so far.
 

Amigo Azul

Member
Jan 15, 2020
44
Saranac Inn
How many square feet are you heating with your new stove? Glad to hear you are happy with it so far.
The house is 1100 sqft. I open the 3 season porch and my garage door and heat those ares too. So about 1700 total.
 

Amigo Azul

Member
Jan 15, 2020
44
Saranac Inn
So I picked up on something in a different thread on here. I'm paraphrasing a little here but, "The catalyst thermometer is bad and a piece of junk and doesn't work" so I checked mine and sure enough it doesn't work properly. I pulled it out and the temperature never went down from 1100 degrees!? I moved it with my finger and it went down. I put it back in the side of the stove and it went back up. I said to myself what is this strange voodoo that is going on?

So off to the manual I go and low and behold the thermometer was installed incorrectly just as it is stated in the manual.

Incorrect:

1582209576915.png

correct:

1582209593291.png

make sure to push it all the way to the washer:

1582209628017.png


So now the crappy thermometer works! The installers must not have read that part of the manual. The dealer is sending me a new one anyway so I'll have a spare. Amazing what a little magnetism can do.

Other than that little thing the stove has been amazing and been working really well.