Just Curious - How Many Store Pellets Outside?

Dataman

Feeling the Heat
Sep 10, 2018
482
Newport, Wa
I have building with Bays that are open on one side. Thinking of Storing Pellets in the bay that is on Leeward Side (Sheltered from Wind).

Yes I know indoor is best place.

But still thinking of moving car to bay and pellets to heated garage.

I would tarp the open ton. Easy to move them bag by bag to house. Easier in Garage. In future they will go into Garage.
 
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vinny11950

Minister of Fire
May 17, 2010
1,588
Eastern Long Island, NY
I tried it last year and the pellets were fine. I kept them wrapped in the wrapping they came in and added a tarp over them with bungee chords holding it in place. I still have 1/2 a ton left over from last year under a tarp. I haven't inspected yet but I am sure it is fine. Like everything else, the pellets will absorb some humidity with the climate cycles but as long as they don't get wet they are fine. When burning, I bring them in the house 15 bags at a time. After a couple of days, whatever humidity was in the pellet has dried out.
 
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jp99

Burning Hunk
Jan 7, 2015
140
Ohio
I've used a small Rubbermaid shed outside that stores nearly one ton. It keeps the water/snow off but obviously the pellets change with the outdoor humidity - which, in the winter, is moderate but becomes very low when warmed to inside temperatures.

This year I'm also storing one additional ton on a pallet outside, under a tarp. They should be fine as well, as others like vinny above do this.
 

Dataman

Feeling the Heat
Sep 10, 2018
482
Newport, Wa
Thanks. I plan on keeping some inside. Just have to get the Jungle off the Stone Area. (Wife taken over with Plants). In number of years when we go down to 2 cars that will free up garage space. So far heating at night and it's been nice not using furnace. Got down to 35f this Am. Old Man Winter is coming early it seems in Pacific NW.
 

vinny11950

Minister of Fire
May 17, 2010
1,588
Eastern Long Island, NY
Thanks. I plan on keeping some inside. Just have to get the Jungle off the Stone Area. (Wife taken over with Plants). In number of years when we go down to 2 cars that will free up garage space. So far heating at night and it's been nice not using furnace. Got down to 35f this Am. Old Man Winter is coming early it seems in Pacific NW.
Didn't realize it was getting so cold so early over there. It is still hot and humid here.
 
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Battleman13

New Member
Sep 4, 2018
26
Near Pittsburgh PA
I'd keep a day or twos worth of pellets in a heated space, and replenish daily. That way the pellets that are going to be burned have had a day or two in the heated space to adjust their moisture content a bit. Sealed bags under a tarp shouldn't be affected too majorly, but still seems like a good idea to have a day or twos worth of "acclimated" pellets on deck.


It was getting pretty chilly at night out here in Western PA, with night time temps some times approaching and dipping under 50F. We then had a decent pullback for a week to 10 days of pretty warm weather and it's chilled back off since. I think cold weather is going to set in soon. I expect we have seen the last of the really warm weather this year.
 

railfanron

Feeling the Heat
Nov 2, 2013
447
Perry MI
I store my pellets in my workshop. It's heated only when I'm working in it. I then move a week or twos worth of pellets to the back porch. They sit off the floor and uncovered and I carry them in as needed. I've had no problems doing this for the last four years. The porch is on the eastern side of the house, covered and open on three sides.
Ron
 
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bogieb

Minister of Fire
Oct 31, 2014
2,730
South Central NH
I tried it last year and the pellets were fine. I kept them wrapped in the wrapping they came in and added a tarp over them with bungee chords holding it in place. I still have 1/2 a ton left over from last year under a tarp. I haven't inspected yet but I am sure it is fine. Like everything else, the pellets will absorb some humidity with the climate cycles but as long as they don't get wet they are fine. When burning, I bring them in the house 15 bags at a time. After a couple of days, whatever humidity was in the pellet has dried out.
I still have a ton in the yard from the fire sale a couple of years ago (I started with 8 tons outside). Will be moving them into the house this fall. I keep a couple ton in the house, a couple ton in the garage, and any overflow out in the yard wrapped exactly as Vinny describes. I haven't had any issues, although I haven't checked that ton - will find out when I get it moved but I see no reason they would unless rodents have chewed their way in to make nests.
 

vinny11950

Minister of Fire
May 17, 2010
1,588
Eastern Long Island, NY
I found some pics of my setup. The delivery guy didn't have the pallet jack truck that could manuever the pallets into the spots that I wanted, so I had to restack them.

A couple of notes:

If you plan on having the pallets next to each or against a wall, like my fence, make sure to leave enough room to work the tarp and the bungee cords for those tight spaces. If you look at my setup, I covered everything with one big tarp except the front. The I layered a longer piece of tarp like an apron to cover the front spot. This allows for easy access to the pellets without having to take off the big tarp.

pelletstor1.jpg

This is some of the condensation you get. Not too bad.

pelletstor2.jpg
 
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Dataman

Feeling the Heat
Sep 10, 2018
482
Newport, Wa
I found some pics of my setup. The delivery guy didn't have the pallet jack truck that could manuever the pallets into the spots that I wanted, so I had to restack them.

A couple of notes:

If you plan on having the pallets next to each or against a wall, like my fence, make sure to leave enough room to work the tarp and the bungee cords for those tight spaces. If you look at my setup, I covered everything with one big tarp except the front. The I layered a longer piece of tarp like an apron to cover the front spot. This allows for easy access to the pellets without having to take off the big tarp.

View attachment 229631

This is some of the condensation you get. Not too bad.

View attachment 229632
Nice. My Confidence is up seeing how many do this. Great Job on Tarps. I will upload pics after Pellets arrive. Planing on Putting Tarp on open pallet. Almost go everything I ordered, just missing 100ah Battery and Pellets. I have some pellets and stove is working great.
 

vinny11950

Minister of Fire
May 17, 2010
1,588
Eastern Long Island, NY
I am getting old, so this was done just out of necessity because me at 38 years old had no trouble hauling pellets from the shed in the back yard. But 46 year old me says why not just leave the pellets closer to the front door. :)
 

Dataman

Feeling the Heat
Sep 10, 2018
482
Newport, Wa
I am getting old, so this was done just out of necessity because me at 38 years old had no trouble hauling pellets from the shed in the back yard. But 46 year old me says why not just leave the pellets closer to the front door. :)
Got ya Beat at 60. Bag of Pellets is easy compared to armfull of Wood. Going to have wife bring all the pellets up in Tractor's Bucket and I will load and unload. Tractor can move 600lb easily enough. When it gets low on the pallet we can just put them on back porch for easy of use. Or Not. Depends on how much snow slides off roof (metal roof). It blocks back porch off. Still trying to recover from tripping over wood I bucked up. God did that hurt. Torn Musel in shoulder and cartilage. Lost some of what I had. I don't recommend being stupid (could have had her move them so I did not trip).
 

vinny11950

Minister of Fire
May 17, 2010
1,588
Eastern Long Island, NY
Still trying to recover from tripping over wood I bucked up. God did that hurt. Torn Musel in shoulder and cartilage. Lost some of what I had. I don't recommend being stupid (could have had her move them so I did not trip)
That sucks. Glad you are getting better. My parents do most of the pellet loading into the stove. They are pushing late 70s. I do most of the hauling into the house to save them the longer runs. We also keep a pallet off to the side of the front door, for when the snow piles up in the coldest months. Even when snowed in, we can just reach into that stash and get pellets. One winter we got hammered with snow and ice followed by frigid temps, and getting pellets became a challenge because they were in the back yard, in the shed.
 

Jhawknseattle

New Member
Dec 24, 2017
71
Lake Stevens (Seattle), WA
I live in the northwest with lots of rain. I will say this against storing them outside. I bought a ton of golden fire which is a very premium Douglas fir brand that the coop stored outside. They burned really bad very ashy and not much heat compared to other stuff I burned. I bought a ton of bear mountain, same manufacturer just a little different blend and cheaper from another place that stores them inside, and burned hot and clean. Maybe it was just a bad batch, but I do not plan on buying any from places that store them outside regardless of how they are stored. M2C
 

tbear853

Burning Hunk
Used to haul them myself, offload into basement using hand truck. Then I'ld throw a bag over shoulder to bring upstairs to stove.

Now, they get stacked at closed end of carport that's attached to house. Co-0p will deliver at $10 extra a ton. Now just two steps up into house.
 
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