Log splitter tank flange/fitting?

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tebenhoh

Burning Hunk
May 19, 2020
101
Southern Illinois
The kick down and relief pressure need to be set for the engine.
That sure explains a big pump bogging down a small engine.
I do know both can usually be adjusted, but most of what I’ve read/heard seems to be based on operator preference in relation to cycle times.
I didn’t adjust either on the old setup, nor on the new 11 gpm pump and valve - the engine barely flinched cycling through my trial rounds.
Thanks, Isaac.
 

Isaac Carlson

Minister of Fire
Nov 19, 2012
1,131
NW Wisconsin
Cycle times can be quickened by increasing the kickdown, but only up to what the engine can handle comfortably.

I am using a 3hp electric motor on an 11 gpm pump and I have the kickdown set a bit lower because of the limited hp.
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
19,564
Philadelphia
The kick down and relief pressure need to be set for the engine.
True, to an extent. A16 gpm pump on a splitter with 1/2" lines will likely bog a typical 160 cc flathead "5.5 hp" engine, just dry cycling the ram, before even putting any wood on the beam. The op has 190cc OHV, which will almost certainly be more up to the task, and it amuses me that both are rated 5.5 hp (if true).

I am using a 3hp electric motor on an 11 gpm pump and I have the kickdown set a bit lower because of the limited hp.
I've never looked at electric splitters, at all. But for torque and cost, I assume they're using universal motors, which have a peak torque to rated horsepower ratio much higher than any gasoline engine. Their torque also doesn't follow the same curve, having more of an ideal hp/5252 rpm trend. I wouldn't expect a 3 hp gasoline engine to do very well at 11 gpm, lacking sufficient torque to keep the RPM's up in the power band, but it's likely no big deal for a universal motor.
 

Isaac Carlson

Minister of Fire
Nov 19, 2012
1,131
NW Wisconsin
True, to an extent. A16 gpm pump on a splitter with 1/2" lines will likely bog a typical 160 cc flathead "5.5 hp" engine, just dry cycling the ram, before even putting any wood on the beam. The op has 190cc OHV, which will almost certainly be more up to the task, and it amuses me that both are rated 5.5 hp (if true).


I've never looked at electric splitters, at all. But for torque and cost, I assume they're using universal motors, which have a peak torque to rated horsepower ratio much higher than any gasoline engine. Their torque also doesn't follow the same curve, having more of an ideal hp/5252 rpm trend. I wouldn't expect a 3 hp gasoline engine to do very well at 11 gpm, lacking sufficient torque to keep the RPM's up in the power band, but it's likely no big deal for a universal motor.

I built my splitter and I am using a "real" 3 hp motor. I believe I have it set rather conservatively, but should check the amp draw to make sure.

I would love to run a 5hp motor and a 16 gpm pump, but the amp draw would require a bigger cord and plugs, and at 100 ft, that gets expensive fast. I could ream the fittings, that's no big deal.
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
19,564
Philadelphia
I built my splitter and I am using a "real" 3 hp motor.
All 3 hp motors are "real", but the method of measurement and the usefulness of result for a given application varies. Universal motors are often measured by stall current. It's as real as anything else, for knowing how much torque and power the thing can produce prior to stalling, but obviously produces a much different result than a split-phase induction motor measured at 5% slip. Of course, with the exception of a repulsion-induction motor (which is really a universal motor coupled to a regular induction motor), most induction motors have very poor start-up torque. RI motors are usually more expensive, heavier, and larger than other (eg. split phase) induction motors, so I'd think them to be a poor choice for a log splitter, but perhaps someone is using them.

I'd suspect most log splitters use universal motors, like a modern wood planer, router, or shop vac. They're extremely high torque, small size and weight, low cost, relatively durable for homeowner use... really everything I think you'd want in a log splitter. There are literally dozens of topologies for electric motors, each with its own pros and cons, with regard to torque, horsepower, size, weight, and cost. I've worked on the half dozen most common types while rebuilding antique industrial machinery (an old hobby), and I guess know more than the average Joe about them, but am by no means an expert.
 

tebenhoh

Burning Hunk
May 19, 2020
101
Southern Illinois
Thanks Isaac and Ashful! I believe you are both above my pay grade as far as engineering and physics go, but don’t get me wrong; I appreciate the input and always look forward to learning the how, why, things work or don’t, and the what to do to fix them.
After splitting 2 - 8ft bed truck loads, I’m glad to report that a 5.5hp (190cc) paired with an 11 gpm pump splits just fine. 👍🏻