Long dead on the ground red oak

MoDoug

Feeling the Heat
Feb 3, 2018
310
NE Missouri
I am with both of you. My stove was just to burn for back up, for looks, and to just burn when we are home because the heat is nice. After the amount of propane it saved me in the first year, and the fact that my wife now has 3 different options for what she can sit on within range of the stove, I run it nonstop until October to April. The entire house just feels warmer and we spend most of the winter in the basement.
I've come to really enjoy the entire process.
I enjoy the entire process also. The only outside involvement I'd had with it, is the stove inspector required by our insurance company. A few weeks ago I told my wife I had no idea of how much work this wood stove was going to be when we decided to put it in. She asked me if I would do it again, and all I could say was yes.
 

MoDoug

Feeling the Heat
Feb 3, 2018
310
NE Missouri
I enjoy the entire process also. The only outside involvement I've had with it, is the stove inspector required by our insurance company. A few weeks ago I told my wife I had no idea of how much work this stove was going to be when we decided to put it in. She asked me if I would do it again, and all I could say was yes.
 

shortys7777

Feeling the Heat
Nov 15, 2017
298
Smithfield, RI
I burned some like that this year. It is messy when its dry inside. I have some rounds like this from sitting dead oak right now out back. I bucked them last week. I plan on splitting and top covering soon for 2 years or so. I also spent a few minutes and hit the bark/soft part with the splitting axe to scrape it off. This should help stop anymore rot.
 
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neverbilly

Burning Hunk
Dec 27, 2015
158
Arkansas, USA
the splits will not lose that much in 3 days throughout the split. If I come across something on the ground ill do a test cut to see of its starting to get punky. I did a thread a few years back on seasoning full rounds. some of the stiff sat for 2 years and was off the ground on pallets and tarped and was still 35%MC and getting punky. A good indicator for oak is if the bark peals off and is wet.. its on its way out
Do you know a link to your old thread? thanks if you do.
 

Woodsplitter67

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2017
1,616
Woolwich nj
What were the revelations of what your 'study' found?
I posted a thread about seasoning in rounds.. it was in direct response to a thread that someone posting a question if wood will actually season in round form. I had rounds cut up and top covered for something like 18 months... the rounds only dropped 10%mc in that time-frame.. so the rounds went from 45 to 35% mc.. the rounds started to get punky and showed rot even though it was top covered and off the ground. Although the rounds did drop some MC I don't really consider 10% really seasoning... and also the wood starting to rot.. All of the wood was oak. there was some debating from some members that the 10% drop in MC was seasoning...
 

neverbilly

Burning Hunk
Dec 27, 2015
158
Arkansas, USA
I posted a thread about seasoning in rounds.. it was in direct response to a thread that someone posting a question if wood will actually season in round form. I had rounds cut up and top covered for something like 18 months... the rounds only dropped 10%mc in that time-frame.. so the rounds went from 45 to 35% mc.. the rounds started to get punky and showed rot even though it was top covered and off the ground. Although the rounds did drop some MC I don't really consider 10% really seasoning... and also the wood starting to rot.. All of the wood was oak. there was some debating from some members that the 10% drop in MC was seasoning...
I dunno... going for 45% to 35% might actually be fairly normal seasoning but the difference seems to be that in round form, they started to go punky. If split, that shouldn't happen; there would be more surface area exposed to the air.
 

MoDoug

Feeling the Heat
Feb 3, 2018
310
NE Missouri
I posted a thread about seasoning in rounds.. it was in direct response to a thread that someone posting a question if wood will actually season in round form. I had rounds cut up and top covered for something like 18 months... the rounds only dropped 10%mc in that time-frame.. so the rounds went from 45 to 35% mc.. the rounds started to get punky and showed rot even though it was top covered and off the ground. Although the rounds did drop some MC I don't really consider 10% really seasoning... and also the wood starting to rot.. All of the wood was oak. there was some debating from some members that the 10% drop in MC was seasoning...
About what diameter size were the rounds you were working with? I would think that at some point smaller diameter rounds would season just fine. This is an interesting topic, on some of my rounds (mind you I'm new to this) that I "think" are on the edge of whether to split or not, I will tap it with the splitter just to crack it open, so moisture has another escape route. I don't know if it helps or not, but I would like to think so.

On some members debating about a 10% drop in MC, I'm with you, a MC still above 20% is not seasoned, especially way up there at 35%.
 

neverbilly

Burning Hunk
Dec 27, 2015
158
Arkansas, USA
About what diameter size were the rounds you were working with? I would think that at some point smaller diameter rounds would season just fine. This is an interesting topic, on some of my rounds (mind you I'm new to this) that I "think" are on the edge of whether to split or not, I will tap it with the splitter just to crack it open, so moisture has another escape route. I don't know if it helps or not, but I would like to think so.

On some members debating about a 10% drop in MC, I'm with you, a MC still above 20% is not seasoned, especially way up there at 35%.
I added this statement to my post.

"When I said fairly normal seasoning, I meant the process of seasoning, not totally seasoned." Going from 45 to 35 is progress. And my point being, perhaps not far off from a normal amount of seasoning for oak. I find 35% MC all the time on oak aged 18 months. It takes a long time!
 

MoDoug

Feeling the Heat
Feb 3, 2018
310
NE Missouri
I added this statement to my post.

"When I said fairly normal seasoning, I meant the process of seasoning, not totally seasoned." Going from 45 to 35 is progress. And my point being, perhaps not far off from a normal amount of seasoning for oak. I find 35% MC all the time on oak aged 18 months. It takes a long time!
I agree about the progress of the moisture content that @Woodsplitter67 was monitoring, and that oak takes a long time to season. Mostly I am curious about what size rounds he was dealing with. I'm also looking for opinions on what size rounds are good to go straight to the stack unsplit.
 

TradEddie

Minister of Fire
Jan 24, 2012
917
SE PA
That wood will burn well - in 2023. I've some very similar looking red oak that had been standing dead for two years, 1" of punk on the outside, solid inside. It was split, stacked and stored in direct sun, under cover 20 months ago, and the center of most splits is still over 20%. It burns, but it takes a lot more care with the air control, and gives more smoky glass. I'm burning poplar, and even some oak felled alive from the same time, because the "live" oak has similar %mc, but is more consistent.

TE
 

Woodsplitter67

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2017
1,616
Woolwich nj
So I dug up a picture of the rounds I was working with. Again this was in reply to a question that was going on. I believe that the original thread the OP had something like 18 in rounds and wanted to season them in that form. The wood he was asking about I believe was the same as mine ..oak..My rounds that you can see. some are 18 inches and some are over 30 inches.. Mostly all started to show rot and if left to season like this would have degrade even more losing more BTUs. The smaller limbs that are 6 inches round that are in my shed.. I dont consider them rounds.. they are branches.. the stuff that is larger like 12 and over maybe considered.. but mostly I consider 16 inches and up I consider rounds.. or round form.. This is very subjective.. its like burn time.. is burn time the time you see flames or heat your house... I truly don't think a 10% in 18 months is seasoning... AGAIN its subjective... to me I can get the same kind wood to drop 23%mc in the same time period and with out any rot or losing any BTUs. I am very particular about my wood. I like my wood clean and in good condition with no rot and it is less messy, I split alot of my wood square so it stacks nicely in my firebox and I get great burn times. If I'm going to do this amount of work I want to get the most out of my wood..
20171018_135153.jpg 20171020_073543.jpg
 
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TradEddie

Minister of Fire
Jan 24, 2012
917
SE PA
I'm also looking for opinions on what size rounds are good to go straight to the stack unsplit.
Anything bigger than about 6" rounds, I'll split it smaller, especially if it's a slow drying species. Even then, a sub 6" round with bark will take noticeably longer to season than an equivalent split with exposed sides. Smaller than 6" go into my racks, but usually end up the firepit anyway.
TE
 
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MoDoug

Feeling the Heat
Feb 3, 2018
310
NE Missouri
So I dug up a picture of the rounds I was working with. Again this was in reply to a question that was going on. I believe that the original thread the OP had something like 18 in rounds and wanted to season them in that form. The wood he was asking about I believe was the same as mine ..oak..My rounds that you can see. some are 18 inches and some are over 30 inches.. Mostly all started to show rot and if left to season like this would have degrade even more losing more BTUs. The smaller limbs that are 6 inches round that are in my shed.. I dont consider them rounds.. they are branches.. the stuff that is larger like 12 and over maybe considered.. but mostly I consider 16 inches and up I consider rounds.. or round form.. This is very subjective.. its like burn time.. is burn time the time you see flames or heat your house... I truly don't think a 10% in 18 months is seasoning... AGAIN its subjective... to me I can get the same kind wood to drop 23%mc in the same time period and with out any rot or losing any BTUs. I am very particular about my wood. I like my wood clean and in good condition with no rot and it is less messy, I split alot of my wood square so it stacks nicely in my firebox and I get great burn times. If I'm going to do this amount of work I want to get the most out of my wood..
View attachment 271549 View attachment 271550
Those are some big rounds to test seasoning. I've been collecting wood the past two days and the biggest I've got is about 17", I would never consider seasoning them, I was thinking maybe 8" or so, something that would fit in my stove door.
I've been splitting some of my wood in squares, rectangles actually, to use for over nighters with long burn time. But those won't be seasoned till next year for some, and longer for most. I've gotten a lot of green hard wood lately, white oak, black oak, hickory, and sugar maple, I'm thinking would be ideal candidate to make a kiln for.
 

Woodsplitter67

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2017
1,616
Woolwich nj
Those are some big rounds to test seasoning. I've been collecting wood the past two days and the biggest I've got is about 17", I would never consider seasoning them, I was thinking maybe 8" or so, something that would fit in my stove door.
I've been splitting some of my wood in squares, rectangles actually, to use for over nighters with long burn time. But those won't be seasoned till next year for some, and longer for most. I've gotten a lot of green hard wood lately, white oak, black oak, hickory, and sugar maple, I'm thinking would be ideal candidate to make a kiln for.
I was not trying to season the rounds.. There was a thread going on.. someone asked a question of whether or not ..could you season in round form. I had stored my rounds to be split later. The rounds were in storage for 18 months.. I decided to do some testing and post the results

Any wood is a good candidate for a kiln.. Poindexter in Alaska seasons soft wood in his..
 
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MoDoug

Feeling the Heat
Feb 3, 2018
310
NE Missouri
Anything bigger than about 6" rounds, I'll split it smaller, especially if it's a slow drying species. Even then, a sub 6" round with bark will take noticeably longer to season than an equivalent split with exposed sides. Smaller than 6" go into my racks, but usually end up the firepit anyway.
TE
Sounds like I need to send more of my dead with no bark rounds to the stack instead of splitting them. I've cut a lot of live trees this season, which is all hard wood, so those I'll keep splitting like usual.
 

Woodsplitter67

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2017
1,616
Woolwich nj
Sounds like I need to send more of my dead with no bark rounds to the stack instead of splitting them. I've cut a lot of live trees this season, which is all hard wood, so those I'll keep splitting like usual.
You can let them sit for a little. I have wood that I scrounge in the spring of 2020 that I'll start to cut up the end of the month. Just keep in mind that the longer it sits it will start to get punky.. As with the rest of us.. I run out of time to do projects.. or just get to busy at work. My son who does wood with me likes our current set up... split in January/February... scrounge late February March April.. take a break..
 

MoDoug

Feeling the Heat
Feb 3, 2018
310
NE Missouri
You can let them sit for a little...... .. take a break..
That is great and timely advice! A couple of my problems are that I am obsessed to get ahead while I can, and I enjoy the process. But you are spot on with taking a break. Appreciate the insight.
 

TradEddie

Minister of Fire
Jan 24, 2012
917
SE PA
That is great and timely advice! A couple of my problems are that I am obsessed to get ahead while I can, and I enjoy the process. But you are spot on with taking a break. Appreciate the insight.
Remember that it's far nicer to split logs in Winter. Unless there's some compelling reason, I consider anything above 50F too hot for splitting by hand. Any dead fall or storm damage that needs to be cleared in Spring, Summer or Fall will sit in rounds until the weather cools. getting ahead helps that way too.

TE
 
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