Looking for more info on my stove

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Bumpo

New Member
Nov 20, 2021
3
New Hampshire
Just bought this stove and I'm looking for as much information on it as possible. It appears to be a grandma stove, fireplace series.
Fisher.jpeg

Fisher 1.jpeg


Hopefully this will be my main source of heat for most of the winter. On the back panel, it has stamped... 10 78 GM 10855B. Not sure what that means. Also, it appears that there a channel for a gasket in the front doors, but I've read that Fisher stoves don't need gaskets so do I leave that channel empty?
Can I go from a 8" pipe to a 6" pipe with this stove and still use it with the occasional open door viewing?
Also looking to see if anyone could point me in the right direction in obtaining a viewing screen for this stove?
Thanks!
 
Last edited:

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
29,088
central pa
Just bought this stove and I'm looking for as much information on it as possible. It appears to be a grandma stove, fireplace series. View attachment 285912
View attachment 285913

Hopefully this will be my main source of heat for most of the winter. On the back panel, it has stamped... 10 78 GM 10855B. Not sure what that means. Also, it appears that there a channel for a gasket in the front doors, but I've read that Fisher stoves don't need gaskets so do I leave that channel empty?
Can I go from a 8" pipe to a 6" pipe with this stove and still use it with the occasional open door viewing?
Also looking to see if anyone could point me in the right direction in obtaining a viewing screen for this stove?
Thanks!
You absolutely can't use it with the doors open on 6". If the chimney is short it may not work correctly at all on 6"
 
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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
29,088
central pa
The pipe that’s on the stove in the photo is not the pipe that I’ll be using, it’s just how the guy sold it
Ok not sure what that has to do with anything..
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
7,023
Downeast Maine
You might be using that pipe, it's welded to the top of the stove.
 
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coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,589
NE PA
Just bought this stove and I'm looking for as much information on it as possible. It appears to be a grandma stove, fireplace series. View attachment 285912
View attachment 285913

Hopefully this will be my main source of heat for most of the winter. On the back panel, it has stamped... 10 78 GM 10855B. Not sure what that means. Also, it appears that there a channel for a gasket in the front doors, but I've read that Fisher stoves don't need gaskets so do I leave that channel empty?
Can I go from a 8" pipe to a 6" pipe with this stove and still use it with the occasional open door viewing?
Also looking to see if anyone could point me in the right direction in obtaining a viewing screen for this stove?
Thanks!
Made 10/78 and was the 10,855th stove made in Bow New Hampshire.

When you wire wheel the entire stove also open doors and wire wheel the door seal which is the channel iron welded to stove front. Wire wheel the back of doors so you get a clean contact surface all the way around. That is the only thing required for a good seal.

The screen is the same for the Insert, Goldilocks, and Teddy Bear. So they are the easiest to find of all screens. Not saying they are readily available, but do come up for sale from time to time. That are not considered a radiant heater in Fireplace Mode and you will need a damper to slow the fire operating with doors open. With fire established, slowly close damper until the smoke rolls in at top of door opening. Open slightly to allow smoke to evacuate, while retaining as much heat as possible in stove. This is the only control to slow fire with doors open and screen in place.

Are you reducing the pipe to 6 to accommodate a 6 inch insulated chimney?
Reducing to 6 depends on many factors. Chimney type, pipe configuration, cap, outdoor temperature, atmospheric conditions as well as how heat rises in home up and away from stove. (negative air pressure in building) The larger the chimney diameter, the more BTU capacity it has. Like an engine with a restrictor plate to slow air flow, it won’t have the wide open high output as an 8 allows, but depending on the area heated, you may never need the full output such as needed in a large open space and be able to run at cruise where it is most efficient anyway.

So don’t expect a larger stove reduced to 6 to operate properly with elbows, tee at chimney, 10 foot rise, with partially clogged screen on top on a 60* day.
 
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coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,589
NE PA
You might be using that pipe, it's welded to the top of the stove.
I believe your looking at the weld of the stove collar on stove. Many slip the pipe over the older stove connector since they were 8 inch OD instead of 8 inch ID like newer stoves. The pipe into stove should have been a double skirted connector made for that purpose, or straight pipe crimped smaller by hand until it fit into the stove connector.
When reducing, use an 8 inch male x 6 female adapter crimped down as necessary to fit into stove. As you crimp the factory crimped end more by hand, apply outward bending force to prevent the angled funnel shape of the male end.
 
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Bumpo

New Member
Nov 20, 2021
3
New Hampshire
This 8 to 6 thing has been beat to death on this
Thank you for
Made 10/78 and was the 10,855th stove made in Bow New Hampshire.

When you wire wheel the entire stove also open doors and wire wheel the door seal which is the channel iron welded to stove front. Wire wheel the back of doors so you get a clean contact surface all the way around. That is the only thing required for a good seal.

The screen is the same for the Insert, Goldilocks, and Teddy Bear. So they are the easiest to find of all screens. Not saying they are readily available, but do come up for sale from time to time. That are not considered a radiant heater in Fireplace Mode and you will need a damper to slow the fire operating with doors open. With fire established, slowly close damper until the smoke rolls in at top of door opening. Open slightly to allow smoke to evacuate, while retaining as much heat as possible in stove. This is the only control to slow fire with doors open and screen in place.

Are you reducing the pipe to 6 to accommodate a 6 inch insulated chimney?
Reducing to 6 depends on many factors. Chimney type, pipe configuration, cap, outdoor temperature, atmospheric conditions as well as how heat rises in home up and away from stove. (negative air pressure in building) The larger the chimney diameter, the more BTU capacity it has. Like an engine with a restrictor plate to slow air flow, it won’t have the wide open high output as an 8 allows, but depending on the area heated, you may never need the full output such as needed in a large open space and be able to run at cruise where it is most efficient anyway.

So don’t expect a larger stove reduced to 6 to operate properly with elbows, tee at chimney, 10 foot rise, with partially clogged screen on top on a 60* day.
I would assume that my wood stove would be a series III model then?
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,589
NE PA
Thank you for

I would assume that my wood stove would be a series III model then?
No, Series I.
Series III is 1979 and after. In ‘79 they were available with the older flat top doors or the new optional Cathedral arched top door design for 1980.
The flat top doors were discontinued for 1980 and the Series III without angle iron corners was the first UL listed stove. This model also had rear and bottom shields and internal baffle plate. Most fabricators continued to make the old style box as well where UL approval was not required when installed on it near non-combustible surfaces. They sold for $100 less. They had no tag, but were considered Series III and shown as such on the owners manual cover.