Lopi Leyden problems - low burn time, house smells like smoke, back puffs, etc.

  • Active since 1995, Hearth.com is THE place on the internet for free information and advice about wood stoves, pellet stoves and other energy saving equipment.

    We strive to provide opinions, articles, discussions and history related to Hearth Products and in a more general sense, energy issues.

    We promote the EFFICIENT, RESPONSIBLE, CLEAN and SAFE use of all fuels, whether renewable or fossil.

Kevin Weis

Minister of Fire
Mar 3, 2018
932
Union Bridge, Md
Your collecting too much off gasses which ignite in the stove causing positive pressure. Positive pressure will push smoke out any unsealed or weakly sealed areas. Draft not enough to pull the gasses through before they ignite in the stove. Fixes are increasing draft and using bigger splits of the right MC to reduce the off gassing. If you don't do this you will not fix the problem. Kevin
 

branchburner

Minister of Fire
Sep 27, 2008
2,758
southern NH
Your collecting too much off gasses which ignite in the stove causing positive pressure. Draft not enough to pull the gasses through before they ignite in the stove.

Well, he does want the gasses to ignite in the stove, but in the process of a continuous and efficient secondary burn (rather than in the process of unburned gasses accumulating and then exploding). So the problem could be not just with draft or fuel, but with a flaw in the re-burn mechanism, such as a clogged combustor or damage from over-firing (which is quite likely with this particular stove).
 

Fennesseyb

New Member
Jan 23, 2018
19
WI
MisterFixIt, spoken like a true Leyden owner! This will be my last season with the stove. Sell it for very cheap, with a full disclosure, or just give it away to someone.

Last night I put the cement in the area the smoke was escaping from, tonight I'll fire it up and see if that solved it for at least this season.

A couple have mentioned some change in the house (tighter, or different appliance) that may be causing different pressure. There have been no changes, we have an old leaky Victorian home, I've never had to open a window or anything like that.
 

Fennesseyb

New Member
Jan 23, 2018
19
WI
Can you finger tool some stove cement in there for this season?

The stove cement worked great for that area! Now the smoke is escaping from under the top piece (not the lid). Same scenario, during secondary combustion. I think I'm just going to have to go around the stove and cement every seam. I know this will make it difficult for future repairs / maintenance, but this stove belongs in the landfill anyway.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,572
South Puget Sound, WA
The stove cement worked great for that area! Now the smoke is escaping from under the top piece (not the lid). Same scenario, during secondary combustion. I think I'm just going to have to go around the stove and cement every seam. I know this will make it difficult for future repairs / maintenance, but this stove belongs in the landfill anyway.
Scrap yard is much better. That way it can be recycled.
 

Fennesseyb

New Member
Jan 23, 2018
19
WI
Sealed up most of the joints, need to take off the rear collar to get back there. It's the only spot still left. Still smoke smell. Weird thing is I'm getting secondary burns longer than I've ever had before and the stove is holding high temps better than ever before.

Time to just get the Jotul Firelight I've had my eye on ever since I got this Leyden.
 

Biker B

New Member
Mar 2, 2019
1
Peoria, IL
Did the 2x4 burn this morning and kept a close eye on the stove. Lots of secondary combustion going on inside the stove. Almost every time you would see secondary combustion flames, a small little puff of smoke would come out the back. Back right corner out of the seam. I've attached a photo of the seam where smoke is coming out.

Once the secondary combustion flames slowed way down, the smoke stopped coming out. Smoke was coming out probably every 30-60 seconds at its worst.

The first and second year I owned the stove were probably the greenest wood I burned. This year is the driest wood yet. That could explain why it's so bad this year. The dry wood is creating more secondary burn than ever before. The secondary burn must create added pressure that forces smoke out the back?

The last paragraph tells much more about your stove than you think. The Leyden stove has a fiber combuster block behind the rear refractory. Once the combuster is clogged, the stove will puff smoke out of every crack and crevice it can find. Even if the combuster appears to be solid, it can still be clogged and using green wood will clog it up really fast. More than likely, that green wood that you burned for 2 years has clogged the combuster. I would suggest a new combuster. Do you even know how old it was when you bought the stove?

The other thing is draft. Check your manual, because this stove is engineered for a maximum 33" chimney. I would recommend that you get a high wind cap because your chimney is beyond what this stove supports. Just because you have a long draft (chimney) does not mean you have enough draft. When a chimney is taller than recommended for the stove a high wind cap can help.

Any stove with a combuster can be fussy and a stove with a fiber combuster can be a bit harder to diagnose.
 

webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
11,062
Indiana
The last paragraph tells much more about your stove than you think. The Leyden stove has a fiber combuster block behind the rear refractory. Once the combuster is clogged, the stove will puff smoke out of every crack and crevice it can find. Even if the combuster appears to be solid, it can still be clogged and using green wood will clog it up really fast. More than likely, that green wood that you burned for 2 years has clogged the combuster. I would suggest a new combuster. Do you even know how old it was when you bought the stove?

The other thing is draft. Check your manual, because this stove is engineered for a maximum 33" chimney. I would recommend that you get a high wind cap because your chimney is beyond what this stove supports. Just because you have a long draft (chimney) does not mean you have enough draft. When a chimney is taller than recommended for the stove a high wind cap can help.

Any stove with a combuster can be fussy and a stove with a fiber combuster can be a bit harder to diagnose.
Let’s not confuse a non-cat down draft combustion system for catalytic combustion system. Combuster isn’t an appropriate description for a non-cat system.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,572
South Puget Sound, WA
Yeah, that got me too, but it's what Lopi calls it in their parts listing.
Screen Shot 2019-03-02 at 7.43.55 PM.png
 

branchburner

Minister of Fire
Sep 27, 2008
2,758
southern NH
Let’s not confuse a non-cat down draft combustion system for catalytic combustion system. Combuster isn’t an appropriate description for a non-cat system.

Harman refers to it as a "combustion package" and others commonly call it the"combustion chamber"or "afterburner." I, too, think the term "combustor" should refer to a catalytic combustor when discussing wood stoves. But technically speaking, "combustor" actually IS an appropriate term as used by BikerB, in reference to a place where combustion occurs.
 

webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
11,062
Indiana
Harman refers to it as a "combustion package" and others commonly call it the"combustion chamber"or "afterburner." I, too, think the term "combustor" should refer to a catalytic combustor when discussing wood stoves. But technically speaking, "combustor" actually IS an appropriate term as used by BikerB, in reference to a place where combustion occurs.
Combustion package is what it’s commonly called. Lopi can call it whatever they want. How’d they finish again? Dead last!;lol