Manual vs power/professional chain sharpening?

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Woodspliter

Member
Jan 25, 2020
131
Maine
I've got the same set up. That's awesome! Nothing like the perfect geometry everytime. Let's face it pretty expensive for the average firewood cutter but if your like me and have to go scavenging once in a while this is your best friend!
 

Medic21

Minister of Fire
Feb 26, 2017
1,142
Northern Indiana
I've got the same set up. That's awesome! Nothing like the perfect geometry everytime. Let's face it pretty expensive for the average firewood cutter but if your like me and have to go scavenging once in a while this is your best friend!

$350 or so on Amazon, 10-12 Stihl chains. Once I got the hang of it and started sharpening for others I had it paid for in a few months. The CBN wheels make the difference though.
 

duramaxman05

Minister of Fire
Aug 17, 2014
546
Perryville, Mo
$350 or so on Amazon, 10-12 Stihl chains. Once I got the hang of it and started sharpening for others I had it paid for in a few months. The CBN wheels make the difference though.
You can buy the stens brand tecomec super jolly which is the same as the oregon 620-120. Apparently tecomec makes the Oregon grinders. Maverick mower supply has the for $288 and free shipping.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
6,301
Downeast Maine
I derped and forgot to hit the rakers after filing the cutters five or six times. The cutters could shave my face, but won't cut a thing because the rakers are so long...
 

Sawset

Minister of Fire
Feb 14, 2015
1,219
Palmyra, WI
This looks like a handy little gadget and matching chain. Plus it's on a husky, win win. Russian innovation.
 

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Medic21

Minister of Fire
Feb 26, 2017
1,142
Northern Indiana
You can buy the stens brand tecomec super jolly which is the same as the oregon 620-120. Apparently tecomec makes the Oregon grinders. Maverick mower supply has the for $288 and free shipping.
I’ve seen that. I may buy a second on to set up for rakers. I’ve been eyeing the Temco auto one just to use for the rakers.
 

PaulOinMA

Minister of Fire
Oct 20, 2018
1,086
MA
Another vote for the Stihl 2-in1 or equivalent.
 
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RandyBoBandy

Minister of Fire
Feb 25, 2015
1,270
Whitmore lake, MI
Hand power with a lot of patience !!!
 

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duramaxman05

Minister of Fire
Aug 17, 2014
546
Perryville, Mo
I get them on Amazon. $100 a piece. Good for about 1000 chains a wheel.
Would you by chance have the info on those cbn wheels? I am very interested in them. Thanks
 

duramaxman05

Minister of Fire
Aug 17, 2014
546
Perryville, Mo

DodgyNomad

Minister of Fire
Dec 19, 2009
689
West Michigan
I am also a fan of the 2-in-1 tools. I bought a Pferd last season and wish I would've got it years ago. So easy and fast. As @tadmaz stated, my chain cuts better than it did when new.

Another vote for the 2 in 1
 

RandyBoBandy

Minister of Fire
Feb 25, 2015
1,270
Whitmore lake, MI
I like your rig! Looks like a stationary version of the Granberg File-N-Joint.
Thanks. I really like it. It’s simple and very effective. It can take sometime if the chain is in rough shape buts that’s fine with me. I just get a good fire going in the barn and turn on some music and sharpen chains for a couple of hours.
 
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kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
6,115
07462
I have both a 2 in 1 hand sharpener and an electric sharpener, I prefer the hand vs electric to be honest, its just as fast and the hand seems more precise, I have the husky 2:1 it will sharpen the blade and lower the raker all at the same time, I generally touch up my chain every other fuel tank fill, I use full chisel chains now since most of my cutting is just bucking and not felling.
I will still use the electric sharpener to reshape a blade if I hit something in the wood or a rock in the ground, but luckily I haven't had to do that in over a year. Since owning the hand sharpener I've seen a great extended life of my chains, generally I can get on average of 12 full cords bucked on one chain before it gets to stretched out, that's good enough for me.
I've also use to bring my chains to the hardware store down the road from me to get sharpened, idk what they do but they literally take over half the tooth off when sharpening, butchering the chain in the process, that's what got me into sharpening my own stuff to begin with.
 

Medic21

Minister of Fire
Feb 26, 2017
1,142
Northern Indiana
I have both a 2 in 1 hand sharpener and an electric sharpener, I prefer the hand vs electric to be honest, its just as fast and the hand seems more precise, I have the husky 2:1 it will sharpen the blade and lower the raker all at the same time, I generally touch up my chain every other fuel tank fill, I use full chisel chains now since most of my cutting is just bucking and not felling.
I will still use the electric sharpener to reshape a blade if I hit something in the wood or a rock in the ground, but luckily I haven't had to do that in over a year. Since owning the hand sharpener I've seen a great extended life of my chains, generally I can get on average of 12 full cords bucked on one chain before it gets to stretched out, that's good enough for me.
I've also use to bring my chains to the hardware store down the road from me to get sharpened, idk what they do but they literally take over half the tooth off when sharpening, butchering the chain in the process, that's what got me into sharpening my own stuff to begin with.
They usually take the young kid that works in there and say here how this works and turn him loose. He doesn’t know anything at all about what he’s doing.
 

Medic21

Minister of Fire
Feb 26, 2017
1,142
Northern Indiana
These are the before and after for grinding the chain. Unless you hit a rick or chunk of metal that damages the chain this is about normal. .347 inches down to .324. Not even .015 inches off the chain to put an edge that’s better than a factory edge back on it. There is a lot of sharpening left.

I do sharpen more than a lot of people do. I ran this chain for three tanks of fuel today and it was still throwing good chips. It was slowing down though. That’s the difference between having the equipment at your fingertips or paying someone.

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Sawset

Minister of Fire
Feb 14, 2015
1,219
Palmyra, WI
I measured removal rate for 1stroke of the 2:1, and if remember right was about .004to .005".
 

kswaterfowler

Member
Dec 18, 2015
20
Kansas
I keep this in my kit out there with me

I hand filed freehand for a long time. I like this little device. I also have the harbor freight sharpener. I use it after hitting something to set the angle. Also keep a flat file handy for keeping the rakers down.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
6,301
Downeast Maine
I keep this in my kit out there with me

I hand filed freehand for a long time. I like this little device. I also have the harbor freight sharpener. I use it after hitting something to set the angle. Also keep a flat file handy for keeping the rakers down.
I've tried this tool and messed my chain up. It just didn't work well for me.