Marking wood for where to cut

mar13 Posted By mar13, Jun 2, 2019 at 6:00 PM

  1. mar13

    mar13
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    Any tricks out there for how to best mark wood to the right length? I have a lot of rounds that are 19-22 inches and also 3-4 ft rounds that I would like to cut down to 16 inches. I have a 16 inch measuring stick, but I don't want to keep fumbling between that and the saw after each cut, so I would like to do a bunch of measuring at once. Chalk?
     
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  2. Kevin Weis

    Kevin Weis
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    I use neon colored chalk. Works for me.
     
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  3. EODMSgt

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  4. TreePointer

    TreePointer
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    Same here. A magnetic attachment like the Woodcutter's Helper in your link is my favorite.
     
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  5. Mojappa

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    Thankfully I run an 18” bar and know where 18” is from the tip (first bar nut on mine) so I put the tip at the end of the log with the saw parallel to the log, look down at where the nut is in relation to the log, turn saw 90° and make a mark. I make all my marks and then cut. the magnetic attachment seems like a good alternative if you wanted to spend a little money on a solution plus it’s adjustable.
     
  6. CincyBurner

    CincyBurner
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    I eyeball log length just using chain saw - tip of nose to to a measured reference point of the saw (e.g. one of tensioning nuts, felling site line).
    It's quick, and accurate (to within a half inch).
    You can maintain your bucking cadence without needing stop to to physically measure and mark, and you can cut out unwanted portions (knots, forks.
     
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  7. SpaceBus

    SpaceBus
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    You will get the hang of it. Most of my rounds are now 18" +/-1", a few are probably +/- 2". Over time I'm sure they will get even more consistent. For now I'm using the tip of bar(not the chain) to the tip of my bucking spikes and that's about 18" with a 20" bar. I'm thinking of trading my saw and spare chains in on a lighter saw at the dealer through, probably with a 16" bar.
     
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  8. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands
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    I have a small 3/4 inch thick board cut to the length I want with a pull cut hand saw I use to mark every log I cut, I started doing that after my wife had a hard time getting a split that was cut longer than the box in when I was at work.
    pruning-saws-36408-64_400_compressed.jpg
     
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  9. SpaceBus

    SpaceBus
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    I've started checking them before I bring them in, for the same reason.
     
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  10. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands
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    She had loaded up on some nice coals so throwing it out the window wasn't happening since it was going pretty good, she got the split in.
     
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  11. StihlKicking

    StihlKicking
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    I use a Sweetgum stick cut to length, spray painted fluorescent orange. I take my stick and the can of spray paint and mark the length of the log before I start bucking it. Adds about 30 secs to the whole process.
     
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  12. trguitar

    trguitar
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    I used permanent marker on my bar and cover to mark 18". Very simple and quick.
     
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  13. Eureka

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    Stanley FatMax 25' tape measure on my hip and can of orange marking paint in my hand. The FatMax has a big hook and a strong backbone so it makes it easy quick work for me. I cut about 15 cords a year.
     
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  14. Highbeam

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    I demand precision and efficiency (swiss engineer). I just bucket up two cords of doug fir logs this weekend and used the super awesome mingo marker for exactly 16" lengths (minus the kerf width). It is very fast and precise. These are 30" logs and with proper marks made by just walking the tool down the log I can get my bucking saw going and it barely even idles down between cuts.

    Mingo mingo mingo.

    Before the mingo, and if the tree, paint can, or weather makes it not work, I will cut a small whip of branch 16" long but small enough to hold in my right hand while running the saw. Measure each round (mark with eye ball) with the stick in my right hand and then bring the branch to the saw trigger handle in my palm and make the cut.
     
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  15. maple1

    maple1
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    This.
     
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  16. mar13

    mar13
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    I had to Google around a bit to find that one: http://www.themingomarker.com/

    I suppose you get logs dropped off at your place.
     
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  17. Highbeam

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    Over the years I've done it different ways. The F350 can carry a cord but time is valuable and I need 5 cords per year. Loading and driving the truck added a lot of processing time. Fine if it's free but it's not.

    My current favorite is dump truck loads of logs. It's just about 5 cords, cheap, convenient, and it's waste from a tree service or land clearing operation.

    Here is this weekend's load. 14' long logs. Going to fill the 2020/2021 half of the shed.
     

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  18. mar13

    mar13
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    Those actually look like marketable size logs for dimensional lumber (by today's standards).

    Around here you can get tanoak logs cleared from the lumber lands (that which they failed to use round-up on) - great wood but only used by biomass plants, firewood, and wildlife. Eventually I may look into the minimum sized load that can be purchased. A moderate lumber truck load would overwhelm me and risk crushing my driveway.

    Thumbs up on the shed.
     
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  19. Highbeam

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    You need a log truck load of marketable logs to make it taking them to the mill. Tree service guys might get two or three of these down and the money is in the removal. Here's the truck. Packed tight I'm hoping for more than 4 cords. This load was delivered 20 miles from his yard for 400$.

    This is what we call "triaxle" loads here in the PNW. A 14' long dump truck. Any bigger than this is a full sized log truck with 34' logs. The east coast people have some really weird log trucks.
     

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  20. mar13

    mar13
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    I understand better after seeing the full log length. I've learned a bit from the forestry students about the log lengths (I forget the technical term) you can get from a tree. After a certain height, any lumber is used for low quality things like pallets, because of knots, etc. in the wood.
     
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  21. maple1

    maple1
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    Can't be a triaxle - there's only 2 axles back there.


    ==c
     
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  22. Highbeam

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    Steer axle counts as teh third I guess. Many of these will have drop axles or "bogie" axles. This guy was loaded pretty heavy since the logs were green. Made lots of dents in my lawn! A proper triaxle log truck from the east coast wood have a boom I think to minimize the dump damage and stack them in a smaller place.

    I'll start another thread for my weekend adventure so as not to take this one over. I
     
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  23. mar13

    mar13
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    That's fine. I'm the OP and I think it was dying out, anyway. I did notice your nice lawn and wondered about the truck & log dump.

    As for log lengths of doug fir, some people think long and hard about it:
    http://www.westernforesteconomists.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Pilkerton.pdf
     
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  24. johneh

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    DSCF0892.JPG This is the first load of 2
    it is sugar maple and some red oak approx 8 cord
    This is what I cut last winter . The saw logs have been remove
    and this is what has no value for lumber . The second load
    will be sugar maple red oak and a little beach They come on a
    tandem log truck with a grapple Delivery Cost 100 dollars a load
    40 kilometers round trip
     
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  25. maple1

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    That truck here would just be called a tandem.

    'A tandem load'.
     
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