Moving Tarm SOLO-PLUS out of cellar

woodsmaster

Minister of Fire
Jan 25, 2010
2,878
N.W. Ohio
carefully ? He, he. Could use some pipes under it to roll it. Pallet jack would also work. As far as getting it up the stairs now that might be a little trickier.
Some planks on the stairs and pull it op with a truck or a winch. Take the skins off the outside, wrap a tow strap around the boiler towards the bottom.
just some ideas.
 

rockwall

Member
Dec 1, 2015
22
Central Maine
carefully ? He, he. Could use some pipes under it to roll it. Pallet jack would also work. As far as getting it up the stairs now that might be a little trickier.
Some planks on the stairs and pull it op with a truck or a winch. Take the skins off the outside, wrap a tow strap around the boiler towards the bottom.
just some ideas.
Thanks I like your ideas. I do think the stairs will be the trickiest. Is it all right to lay it on its side?
 

maple1

Minister of Fire
Sep 15, 2011
9,872
Nova Scotia
Kind of hard to say without seeing the place.

The owner have any ideas, from when it was installed?

Any friendly neighbours around with a capable front end loader or the like?

Don't know anything about them, but I would also remove whatever can be removed from the inside first. Like refractories etc.. Both to lighten the load, and to prevent damage to them. I don't think I would lay it down without takings skins off first & seeing what it looks like under them.
 

velvetfoot

Minister of Fire
Dec 5, 2005
9,973
Sand Lake, NY
There was a thread where a tow truck's 'crane' was used.
 

maple1

Minister of Fire
Sep 15, 2011
9,872
Nova Scotia
Quick further thought on the laying down thing - if I was going to try that, I would likely try laying it on its back.

Said without knowing the Tarm first hand.

If the smoke pipe exits at the back, I'd lay it down onto a blocking running across the back, just under the pipe exit, to keep the pipe exit from resting on something. If that is done onto planks running up the stairs, then you should be able to pull/push/slide it up the planks. With lots of help, that is. Ropes tied around the bottom somewhere running under & up to guys at the top to pull with. Guys at the bottom pushing. Piece of cake - easy to say from here at least. :)
 

dogwood

Minister of Fire
Mar 22, 2009
805
Western VA
Call Tarm Biomass in New Hampshire (603) 795-9100. They sell them and could probably offer you some advice.
 

airlina

Burning Hunk
Feb 15, 2009
114
western new york
Funny you should ask-last year I decided to to move my Sherman tank AKA Econoburn boiler out of my basement and in to an outside shed. the beast weighs 1500 LBS. so I did everything possible to make the move a non event. As they say prep is everything, the pull out of the basement was a piece of cake but it took a few days of prep to get everything ready. You can find photos by doing this search on this site. Search for Moving an econoburn out of a basement, then about halfway down the page , you will see a thread about moving a furnace out of a cellar and I posted to that thread. My screenname is airlina. Be careful and remember if it doesn't go well sacrifice the boiler not the body!
 

rockwall

Member
Dec 1, 2015
22
Central Maine
I got more info from the homeowner. The stairs can be moved from the bulkhead and you can back right up to the bulkhead. So it seems the boiler could be lifted straight up. What do you think?
 

airlina

Burning Hunk
Feb 15, 2009
114
western new york
when I in initially installed my econoburn in my basement, that is how I did it-removed stairs, then lowered boiler into basement with a crane on the back of a utility truck. The owner of the truck was sure his crane could handle the 1500 lbs,however when we tested it , we found at full extension of the crane arm, the hydraulics couldn't hold the boiler and it would slowly drift earthward. Because we were lowering it anyway it worked but, Lifting it out with this crane would not have worked thus the stair ramps and brace technique that i used. Figure out what the boiler weighs and if you can find a piece of equip. that can lift it- go for it . it will save a bunch of time with ramps and such.
 

maple1

Minister of Fire
Sep 15, 2011
9,872
Nova Scotia
I got more info from the homeowner. The stairs can be moved from the bulkhead and you can back right up to the bulkhead. So it seems the boiler could be lifted straight up. What do you think?
I am still thinking to leave the stairs there & slide it up on planks (laid down on its back if possible), then keep right on going up another set of planks onto a trailer (trailer is lower to get up on than a truck - usually). It depends what else you have to help you with though. If there's something around there that would lift it right up out of the basement right onto whatever you're hauling it away with, then maybe. Like a boom lift or large tractor & FEL. You'll have to keep in mind how you're unloading it when you get home, too.

*Also depends on if it will stand laying down OK - might want to call Tarm about that one, to be sure.

*Might also pay to build a quick simple wood frame around it for the move.
 

mustash29

Minister of Fire
Feb 6, 2012
637
SE CT
I got more info from the homeowner. The stairs can be moved from the bulkhead and you can back right up to the bulkhead. So it seems the boiler could be lifted straight up. What do you think?
I would remove the stairs and hire a tow truck guy to lift it out with hydraulics.

If the current homeowner is worried about a tow truck messing up his lawn then I would check with your local rental centers for a small gantry crane and chain fall. Put a few planks on the sides of bulkhead to create ramps. This will spread out the weight of the gantry's casters. After lifting the boiler just roll it all away from the bulkhead out into the lawn. Back a truck or low bed trailer under the rig & drop her in.

http://www.harborfreight.com/1-ton-capacity-telescoping-gantry-crane-69513.html

A few years ago I moved an Empyre Elite 100 (about 950 lbs) out of a walk out and into my walk out.

Small floor jack to get some blocks under the boiler feet, then used the factory lifting eye and an engine hoist to lift it up in the air. Borrowed my girlfriends sisters Suzuki Quadmaster 500 and hooked a 3.5 x 7 foot U-Haul trailer to the hitch. The trailer cost 17 bucks to rent for the day. I was able to back the trailer right into the other guys basement (he had 2 French doors) and drive it through his very crappy and off camber back yard and up to the driveway.

Strapped the boiler to the trailer and pulled it home with my S-10 blazer. My GF drove the duramax with the quad in the bed.

Once home, I backed the trailer into the garage and lifted it off with the engine hoist. I attached a landscape timber to the boiler feet to make 2 "skis". A plastic pallet was the perfect height to bridge the height difference from my garage floor to my walk out basement / rec room floor. A couple pipes and a few good pushes got it through the door.

Once in the rec room I put a 3 wheeled snowmobile dolly under each corner of the boiler and moved it into position. Floor jack to get the dollies and "skis" out from under it.

The whole operation getting it out of his walk out basement and into mine took less than 5 hours + another half day picking up & dropping off the rented trailer and borrowed quad.

These pics are in reverse order, so start at the end and go backwards for the correct sequence of events.

http://s23.photobucket.com/user/Mustash29/library/Empyre?sort=3&page=1
 
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Bad LP

Minister of Fire
Nov 28, 2014
863
Northern Maine
Remove the top skin and you will see a lifting eye. It weighs about 2000 pounds complete. It rolls very easily on 3/4 gas pipes on the cellar floor. I moved mine from NY to MA then to ME. Other than the prior owner putting it in my pick up I made the move and placement by myself and with a little help from John Deere. Never removed the skin or the refractory parts.

When you get it home into the basement put it up on concrete blocks to make it easier to clean if you have enough overhead clearance.
 

maple1

Minister of Fire
Sep 15, 2011
9,872
Nova Scotia
A few different ways to go about it, for sure.

You could also get it fastened on a couple of skids for dragging upright, or getting rollers under in places, if that would work better, for the whole move. Watch head height though. We can't see everything you'll be dealing with, from where it is now to where it will get finally parked. And what all you have available for help, machinery-wise. If you are going to lift it right out of the basement by the top - you will need to make sure you have something capable. An over anxious friend or neighbour with his compact tractor FEL won't cut it. The tow truck thing should work good.
 

rockwall

Member
Dec 1, 2015
22
Central Maine
I took your advice and contacted a tow truck guy. He came over to look at the moving job. The boiler owner and he couldn't find the eye hook on top of the boiler. Do all Tarms have one? I think the boiler was made in 2005 or so. The trucker also said he had some "skates" we could use to get boiler to bulkhead across cellar floor, anyone know that terminology? Thanks
 

maple1

Minister of Fire
Sep 15, 2011
9,872
Nova Scotia
Did you take the top skin off & look as suggested above?

My boiler didn't have a lifting eye, the recommended thing to do there was screw a nipple & T into the top centre piping tapping (tightly) and lift by that.
 

mustash29

Minister of Fire
Feb 6, 2012
637
SE CT
"Skates" are most likely heavy duty "furniture dollies" for moving machinery, etc.
 

Fred61

Minister of Fire
Nov 26, 2008
2,429
Southeastern Vt.
Machinery skate.jpg

There are several configurations.

It was amazing watching "riggers" moving heavy machinery at my former place of employment. They could move, elevate and load machinery that weighed tons with the simplest of tools. They moved them with their brain and not with brawn.
 

Bad LP

Minister of Fire
Nov 28, 2014
863
Northern Maine
Steel gas pipe is cheaper than buying rollers. I don't know if they can be rented but I can always use pipe for something.
 

rockwall

Member
Dec 1, 2015
22
Central Maine
So I asked the homeowner to look on the top of the Tarm for an eye hook to lift it with. I believe this Tarm Solo plus was built around 2000, do you think some Tarms were made without the eyehooks?
 

rockwall

Member
Dec 1, 2015
22
Central Maine
Well we got the Tarm home and installed and have used it a few days. Of course it was -13 when we switched the boilers but it has kept the house warm. The last few days I have been tweeking the unit, turned down the fan and added chain turbulators. I'm making progress and learning alot and staying warm. I think one of my problems is my firewood is only14" for my old non gasser boiler. It is very dry though so that is a plus. I was able to get it up to 190 operating temp after 3 hours and then it started cycling for 10 hours. I think I'm headed in the right direction and no sliding backwards.
 

BoiledOver

Minister of Fire
Apr 14, 2013
615
43°58'55 N - 85°20' W
Congratulations to your success.