My precious

disturbedinwv

New Member
Aug 9, 2019
15
WV
Finally picked up my old woodstove. I'm hoping I can find a way to use it in our new home.

I can use the top or rear flue. It's an early version of secondary combustion and it pits off a lot of heat for as small as it is. It comes with a tool that's sort of a key to open it, and to pull out an optional screen if you burn with it open.

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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
78,672
South Puget Sound, WA
It's a big stove with huge clearance requirements. First, verify it will fit, Second that all clearances to combustible and hearth requirements are honored and third that the fireplace flue can accommodate an insulated 8" liner.

Can you post a picture of the whole fireplace in which it is proposed to be installed?
 

disturbedinwv

New Member
Aug 9, 2019
15
WV
The waterford is about 30in wide x 30in tall x 18in deep. It's a small stove but puts out a lot of btus.

The fireplace opening is just over 30in high and over 37 in wide.

I could build out a proper size hearth no problem. I'm not sure about the insulated 8 inch liner. The sweep wrote down the dimensions of the flue to be 9x13. They could bust out the flue an extra cost.

So those clearance numbers listed on the plate is for combustible materials right? If so, there would be nothing combustible behind it. Then I should have plenty of clearnce to each side wall.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
78,672
South Puget Sound, WA
30" wide is not small. Nor is the 40" side clearance. Furniture is combustible. I would not go to all this work except for a modern high-efficiency stove. It will heat better with less wood, take a 6" liner, and will provide a nice view of the fire.
 

disturbedinwv

New Member
Aug 9, 2019
15
WV
We would definitely re arrange the room to get the furniture away. I wouldn't like to spend a bunch of money on a new stove when we have one that we like a lot. It is unique and in good shape. I used it for two years.

I found one post about this stove on this forum: https://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/anyone-heard-of-a-waterford-103.9653/

"The 103 was a wood-burning "Fireplace Stove" from the mid-80's. It had two front doors with optional glass panels (but no airwash), and was designed to be burned with the doors open for open-fire ambience, or closed for a (somewhat) controlled combustion burn. The draft control was kind of unique. Instead of a turnscrew or slider, it had a lever that could only be moved to four preset positions.

There was no baffle plate of any kind, just a built in stovepipe-style damper in the 8" flue collar. Nonetheless, this model marked Waterford's earliest attempt at high-tech secondary combustion. Incoming air would flow between the outer cast iron shell and an inner cast iron liner, then squirt out through a single row of tiny holes that spanned the tops of the side and rear liner plates just above door height. Waterford claimed these "secondary air ports" would, by injecting pre-heated air into the upper part of the firebox, cause unburned exhaust gases to ignite and provide more heat (sound familiar?). In the absence of an insulated baffle system, this may or may not have worked; all I can say is we never saw any secondary fire like that produced in today's EPA approved designs."

I'll attach the same picture from this thread. Those folks have clearance issues. lol
 

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blades

Minister of Fire
Nov 23, 2008
3,308
WI, Leroy
get an nc30 roaring and all 4 tubes will have rocket jets emanating from them and they are not pointed directly down