New stove in Old house

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dlb stone

Member
Oct 21, 2019
9
Conestoga, PA
Hi There, hoping for some help on a woodstove install in an old stone house we just bought.

The previous owner had an indoor stove, and had to take it out per his insurance company's request, he said it was because the UL sticker on the stove was too damaged to read. He installed an outdoor wood furnace instead which is still there, but we are more interested in having an indoor stove for all the charms and perks it offers. (and using the outdoor furnace only when it's really cold.)

The chimney for the house doesn't start until the attic, The stove would go on the ground floor, there are ceramic rings in the floors both for an upstairs bedroom and for the floor of the attic. What I came across looking through this forum, was; as soon as you get to a floor or ceiling, you have to switch from a stove pipe to a class A chimney pipe. That would mean we need the class A going through the upstairs bedroom and a portion of the attic before going up and out a relatively short chimney (which we were planning on lining with stainless flex pipe).

I called a local installer for a quote, and showed him the images attached and he said " this does look like something that is not recommended to be safe and will not pass code for safety reasons, So I am afraid we cannot help you with this, We would need to go with an insulated chimney".

Is this through the floor system unsafe and outdated? What would we need to do get this up to code?

We were looking at a used Jotul Oslo, (see listing image) that comes with a length of chimney liner.

Thanks.
 

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Those flue tile pass-throughs are not legal or safe. I agree with the installer. Note that the Oslo is not ideal for corner placement. The side door is supposed to be locked in that type of installation. Is this the ideal location for the stove? If not, where in the house is most central and open to other rooms? That is probably the best location for placement.

If the current location is the best, then the current ceiling tile things need to be removed and then replaced with a class A chimney ceiling support. Then take the class A chimney up, all the way through the roof. There would need to be firestop and attic insulation shield as it passes through the upstairs bedroom ceiling. The chimney pipe would need to be chased (boxed in) where it passes through the bedroom.
 
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Those flue tile pass-throughs are not legal or safe. I agree with the installer. Note that the Oslo is not ideal for corner placement. The side door is supposed to be locked in that type of installation. Is this the ideal location for the stove? If not, where in the house is most central and open to other rooms? That is probably the best location for placement.

If the current location is the best, then the current ceiling tile things need to be removed and then replaced with a class A chimney ceiling support. Then take the class A chimney up, all the way through the roof. There would need to be firestop and attic insulation shield as it passes through the upstairs bedroom ceiling. The chimney pipe would need to be chased (boxed in) where it passes through the bedroom.

Thanks for your reply. At the roof, would the class A chimney go through the existing masonry chimney? Or out it's own path? What kind of stove would you recommend for corner placement?
 
It would go on its own path up through the roof. It looks like it might be possible for the new chimney to be relocated more toward the corner so that the chase upstairs also falls closer to the corner.

There are many front-loading stove options. Is the stove area in a room or wide open to the rest of the first floor? What is the first floor plan like? Open or closed off rooms?
 
It would go on its own path up through the roof. It looks like it might be possible for the new chimney to be relocated more toward the corner so that the chase upstairs also falls closer to the corner.

There are many front-loading stove options. Is the stove area in a room or wide open to the rest of the first floor? What is the first floor plan like? Open or closed off rooms?

The floor plan is relatively closed, I attached a floor plan i just drew up (may have gotten carried away lol) We've talked about taking some of the walls down to open it up but that probably won't happen right away. The old stove site isn't terribly central but we're limited by doors and walls etc. The majority of the house is stone with a stick built kitchen addition (with master bedroom above).

The Jotul side door swings to the left, wouldn't there be plenty of clearance as that's the more open part of the room (not opening into the corner).

Thoughts about running class A on the outside of the building? I know theres some concern about draft and cooling but it sure seems simpler than running through the house. The roof is slate FYI.

Some site's i've found make it sound like a closet can act as a chase... Is that legit or no?
 

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Either location is ok, but heat is going to need help with circulation due to the closed-off rooms. Otherwise the stove room could get pretty hot. The F500 needs 36" clearance to combustibles on the left side. That is an issue with most corner installs and why the manual says the side door must be locked in corner installs. However, most installations are not in stone houses. It looks like with the potential stove site (green), the left wall to the stove is solid stone. If so, that is non-combustible and could be considered an exception, but I would still install the stove so the there was ample room to open the door and put in a 20" log.