New to the forum and inserts.

Cndctrdj

New Member
Jan 3, 2020
19
Plymouth ma USA
Ya I plan on getting some wood that is dry and stacking it for next season and the following. I have some land so I have room to stack it properly. Just need to figure out what a proper stack is.
I thought bio bricks were a no no with these stoves?
I can get a cord of kiln dried wood for ok money to at least enjoy this season as I will be moving in the current wet stuff I have now.
Any other suggestions would be great
 

jatoxico

Minister of Fire
Aug 8, 2011
4,218
Long Island NY
Biobricks are not same as product like Duralogs.

They're just compressed sawdust. Just need to careful not to overload leading to overfire.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
83,703
South Puget Sound, WA
Had some dry kindling. It went up beautifully. No issues with the door open or closed. But my wood must be wet. After everything else went up. The larger logs just smoldered red and really didn't catch on. They eventually burned to Ash. But that's it.
So my question is, what do I do? How do I dry out the wood that I have?
That can be a real challenge depending on how wet the wood is and the species of wood. If this is oak, it is not going to dry out quickly. You could split it in half and bring some in the house in big totes and let it sit for a few weeks. But if the wood is essentially green then it's may take a year or two to dry. If it is >30% moisture content then I wouldn't mix it. The best thing to do in that case is to leave the wood stacked off the ground and top covered, and buy some known dry wood if true kiln dried wood is available. If not, consider buying high-quality, compressed sawdust logs or bricks.
 

Cndctrdj

New Member
Jan 3, 2020
19
Plymouth ma USA
I'll have the moisture tester tomorrow. So I'll check that out.
What does everyone do for wood storage? I've been watching a lot online and seeing so many different things. I was looking at getting a woodshed if that's even the correct name for it.
Something I can put the new dry wood in and leave the older wet stuff out for dry up.
 

Grizzerbear

Minister of Fire
Feb 12, 2019
591
SW Missoura

All the ideas a guy could ever need are in that link. Even a simple prefab carport works just fine.
 

Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
12,160
Southern IN
Left the door open for about 30 minutes.
You should really stay right there, any time you have the door open. The load can dry out a bit more and really take off in a short period of time. You can overfire and damage your stove if you are not right there to catch when the load takes off.
 

Cndctrdj

New Member
Jan 3, 2020
19
Plymouth ma USA
I found out my wife is way better at making fires than I am. She can make them and maintain them for hours.
That's the good news.
The bad news is, the wood I have is all over the place. Some 13% moisture. Some as high as 48%

I'm also having trouble getting the temp to go over 300°f. It really isn't heating up the house. Or even the room. We get the fire going, turn the air down a little. And continues to feed it more and more wood. But the temp never goes up.
 

shortys7777

Feeling the Heat
Nov 15, 2017
250
Smithfield, RI
Only use the dry wood and pack the firebox when you have some solid coals. Don't touch the air till the temp hits 300. Lately my temps have been easily getting over 400. I end up closing the damper all the way and get secondaries for a while.
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
83,703
South Puget Sound, WA
The bad news is, the wood I have is all over the place. Some 13% moisture. Some as high as 48%
Pull out the high moisture wood and set it aside for next year. Trying to burn it is an exercise in futility and a creosote maker. You can tell if it is really wet by weight. When in doubt, bang two splits together. If you get a musical note, it is dry. If one or both go thud, it is wet.
 

Cndctrdj

New Member
Jan 3, 2020
19
Plymouth ma USA
Ok. I'll let her know.
She does not pack a lot of wood in the firebox. She thinks it won't have enough air. I'll get her to pack more in. There is always a lot of extra room
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
83,703
South Puget Sound, WA
Ok. I'll let her know.
She does not pack a lot of wood in the firebox. She thinks it won't have enough air. I'll get her to pack more in. There is always a lot of extra room
My wife runs the stove with partial loads, maybe about 1/2 full. She is more comfortable with a smaller load and that's fine. I'm glad she runs the stove when I am away.
 

hickoryhoarder

Feeling the Heat
Apr 5, 2013
479
Indiana
In our area Menards has bundles of kiln-dried wood, reasonably priced at $3.99, that can be used right away. I tested two last week out of curiosity.

Have you read the directions for your insert very carefully? It is possible you don't have it set to get maximum air at the beginning.

Also, on my Lopi insert, the door must be open an inch or two, as you're starting the fire, to get adequate oxygen and hot burn. Usually for four to ten minutes. So you have to stay in the room. The Lopi insert is trickier to start a fire than most stoves I've used, but their directions are perfect. So maybe that's true with some other inserts?
 
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Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
12,160
Southern IN
having trouble getting the temp to go over 300°f. It really isn't heating up the house. Or even the room. We get the fire going, turn the air down a little. And continues to feed it more and more wood. But the temp never goes up.
That's the thing with trying to burn wet wood; You burn it all up but get no heat. Better to stack it and wait, and used the compressed wood bricks for now.
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
83,703
South Puget Sound, WA
The Lopi insert is trickier to start a fire than most stoves I've used, but their directions are perfect. So maybe that's true with some other inserts?
Are you loading the stove E/W or N/S?
 

Cndctrdj

New Member
Jan 3, 2020
19
Plymouth ma USA
I try east west. She likes north south.
Also I'm going to have to build a wood shed. Leave this current wood for next season and order some dry stuff this season. We are getting much better at having the fire run for a while and not have issues. But currently we are not getting enough heat from the unit. But it's all trial and error.

Can anyone show me pictures of a full unit? I'd love to show my wife so she knows you can put more in.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
83,703
South Puget Sound, WA
N/S will permit fuller loading without concern of a log rolling up against the glass.
 

lml999

Minister of Fire
Oct 25, 2013
503
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
Also the wood isn't the best. I know that. But I have a chord of it and am not going to throw it all away
No such thing as bad wood. :) Even pine. (But lets not go there)

Ideally, you want to take wood that has been cut and split and let it season at least one year. Two years is better (depending on the type of wood.) Over on the wood subforum you'll find lots of great ideas on how to stack wood outside (sun and wind is good, rain isn't bad).

And if you are going to burn regularly, to actually heat with wood, you want to stay two or three years ahead of your demand so that you always have good seasoned wood on hand. You have to expect that any wood that you purchase will be wet and green, not burnable for at least a year or two.

We have all learned this the hard way. Years ago I told one guy that something must be wrong with his wood...it just didn't burn. What was actually wrong was my expectation that freshly delivered wood was burnable.

You may be able to source a small amount of real kiln dried wood that is immediately burnable. That might cover you for this season.
 
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Cndctrdj

New Member
Jan 3, 2020
19
Plymouth ma USA
Ya I'm hoping I can find some dry wood for this seasons and start getting wood for the next season and the one after. Keep a few years out.
Need to buy or make a wood shed.
I wish I had known I needed to get wood three years ago for a stove I didn't own and a house I didn't own
 

Cndctrdj

New Member
Jan 3, 2020
19
Plymouth ma USA
Also... Is it wrong that I get so much more heat from the c550 when I open the door to feed it. Like the temp in the room goes up a good amount when I open the door. When the door is closed I just get a little heat from the unit.
 

lml999

Minister of Fire
Oct 25, 2013
503
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
Ya I'm hoping I can find some dry wood for this seasons and start getting wood for the next season and the one after. Keep a few years out.
Need to buy or make a wood shed.
I wish I had known I needed to get wood three years ago for a stove I didn't own and a house I didn't own
We were all new at this once. One step at a time.

Lots of people here to help!
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
83,703
South Puget Sound, WA
Also... Is it wrong that I get so much more heat from the c550 when I open the door to feed it. Like the temp in the room goes up a good amount when I open the door. When the door is closed I just get a little heat from the unit.
That is radiant heat, but with the door open gobs of air are flooding in and actually cooling down the firebox. With the door closed, once the fire is going strong and the blower is going, there is a lot more convective heat.

PS: Was a block-off plate installed above this insert?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
83,703
South Puget Sound, WA
I try east west. She likes north south.
Also I'm going to have to build a wood shed. Leave this current wood for next season and order some dry stuff this season. We are getting much better at having the fire run for a while and not have issues. But currently we are not getting enough heat from the unit. But it's all trial and error.

Can anyone show me pictures of a full unit? I'd love to show my wife so she knows you can put more in.
Included firebox shots in this thread.