New wood stove in big home in cold climate

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simplynatural

Member
Aug 23, 2015
9
North Dakota
We have a unique home - an a frame with two 20x30 extensions off the side of the A. We have a Pacific energy summit we've used for 10 years ( only been in this home for 3 but brought it with us when we moved).

We had an Englander up until 2 years ago, but it never shut down properly like my other wood stoves. Even with stove damper turned all way off , it burned hot which always scared me. Then we had a house fire due to multiple things including tall chimney that snapped off in 80 mph snow storm which you all helped me work through.
We need a second wood stove at other end of house now ( we try moving the heat through the unique house but can only do so much with fans lol) and are looking for a new stove.
Maybe I'm out to lunch, but I'd like to keep under $3000 not including chimney. I don't want cheap built, but one that lasts like my pe is. ( I lived 10 miles from Canada before and drove up to get it, that's not an option anymore). I see Englander raves here, I feel sick thinking about it.
The a frame is 1200 , has an 800 sq foot basement and 300 sqy for loft.
The pe is in a 20x45 foot extension / living room and We use fans to move wood heat into the a frame and it does great. But on opposite side of a frame is another 20x35 Living area / bedroom area that gets mighty cold so we use small space heater when it's unbearable.
It's wide open space and we'll put wood stove in corner of room where there's a chimney ( it will get new liner and we are tearing out open fireplace as I want free standing). I'm thinking we need a stove in similar size to summit to get A frame a bit warmer ( we are used to 55-65 and lower, but it would be nice to stay above 65:) )

What do you guys recommend we look for? I'm researching drolet, Kuma, etc but would really appreciate some real life suggestions.

We are home to stoke fire all the time, and while we have electric backup furnace, we use wood for all heat year round. Live in zone 3b north Dakota and deal with snow storms, -40, power outages etc.

I thought the ability to cook would be great during outages, but feel like most stoves that have that sacrifice, but maybe I'm wrong...

I liked the englanders bigger box, and that would be nice. Summit works very well and we usually get 8-12 hours between loads in our coldest months.

We have tons of dry wood so that's not an issue.

I think I prefer non catalytic because my spouse is not very into maintenance, finicky starters, fussy care of anything and I can't convince him not to start fires or stoke them, so simple is best for my peace of mind.
Thank you I'm advance for the advice
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,570
South Puget Sound, WA
A second Summit would be fine, though even a Super would help a lot. If money is tight, look at the Drolet HT3000 or the Myriad III or Legend III.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,570
South Puget Sound, WA
Our Alderlea is going on season 13. We like it a lot. The only thing I have replaced so far is the door gasket about 5 years ago. The baffle gasket gets changed and is inexpensive. Same as the Summit. However, I finally made one of my own from 3/8" gasket rope and it's been in for about 4 seasons now. Not sure what the concern about the baffle is, ours still looks good. The firebox, baffle, etc. are the same as the Summit. The T6 would not be too much stove or heat. The cast iron jacket does a remarkable job of leveling out the heat for a more even room temp over the length of the burn. If the stove will be close to the kitchen, it is great to cook on. The swing-away trivets allow a wide range of temperature control.
 
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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,130
central pa
Any knowledge on the alderlea t6? I'm studying it now wondering if it's too much and reading with a bit of concern on baffle box , gaskets and warranties.
We don't see many pacific energies here but the few we do see have held up very well. I have replaced one baffle but that was atleast 20 years old and used hard. My father just chose a pe to replace his worn out 20+ year old quad.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,570
South Puget Sound, WA
This is our baffle, going on 13 yrs. Yeah, I know, it's ashy. The stove will be getting a good cleaning this month.

IMG_2009.jpg
 
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MEngineer24

Member
Dec 6, 2020
108
WV
We have a unique home - an a frame with two 20x30 extensions off the side of the A. We have a Pacific energy summit we've used for 10 years ( only been in this home for 3 but brought it with us when we moved).

We had an Englander up until 2 years ago, but it never shut down properly like my other wood stoves. Even with stove damper turned all way off , it burned hot which always scared me. Then we had a house fire due to multiple things including tall chimney that snapped off in 80 mph snow storm which you all helped me work through.
We need a second wood stove at other end of house now ( we try moving the heat through the unique house but can only do so much with fans lol) and are looking for a new stove.
Maybe I'm out to lunch, but I'd like to keep under $3000 not including chimney. I don't want cheap built, but one that lasts like my pe is. ( I lived 10 miles from Canada before and drove up to get it, that's not an option anymore). I see Englander raves here, I feel sick thinking about it.
The a frame is 1200 , has an 800 sq foot basement and 300 sqy for loft.
The pe is in a 20x45 foot extension / living room and We use fans to move wood heat into the a frame and it does great. But on opposite side of a frame is another 20x35 Living area / bedroom area that gets mighty cold so we use small space heater when it's unbearable.
It's wide open space and we'll put wood stove in corner of room where there's a chimney ( it will get new liner and we are tearing out open fireplace as I want free standing). I'm thinking we need a stove in similar size to summit to get A frame a bit warmer ( we are used to 55-65 and lower, but it would be nice to stay above 65:) )

What do you guys recommend we look for? I'm researching drolet, Kuma, etc but would really appreciate some real life suggestions.

We are home to stoke fire all the time, and while we have electric backup furnace, we use wood for all heat year round. Live in zone 3b north Dakota and deal with snow storms, -40, power outages etc.

I thought the ability to cook would be great during outages, but feel like most stoves that have that sacrifice, but maybe I'm wrong...

I liked the englanders bigger box, and that would be nice. Summit works very well and we usually get 8-12 hours between loads in our coldest months.

We have tons of dry wood so that's not an issue.

I think I prefer non catalytic because my spouse is not very into maintenance, finicky starters, fussy care of anything and I can't convince him not to start fires or stoke them, so simple is best for my peace of mind.
Thank you I'm advance for the advice
Was that a class A chimney that failed during the 80 mph winds? If so, any ideas what caused the failure?
 
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MEngineer24

Member
Dec 6, 2020
108
WV
80mph is no big deal. There were other causes.
I’ve often wondered what the wind rating on a classA would be. It’s definitely not listed anywhere that I’ve seen. Was the chimney installed incorrectly or something?
 

Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
19,311
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
I’ve often wondered what the wind rating on a classA would be. It’s definitely not listed anywhere that I’ve seen. Was the chimney installed incorrectly or something?

Being an A-frame, I'm guessing very tall and not properly braced. You're supposed to brace it every 5 feet above the roof line. Then of course, there is the snow sliding off.

It wasn't the wind alone.

I don't actually know what the cause was for the OP's chimney falling off but it wasn't wind. We get 80 mph winds regularly and my pipes are fine.
 
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MEngineer24

Member
Dec 6, 2020
108
WV
Being an A-frame, I'm guessing very tall and not properly braced. You're supposed to brace it every 5 feet above the roof line. Then of course, there is the snow sliding off.

It wasn't the wind alone.

I don't actually know what the cause was for the OP's chimney falling off but it wasn't wind. We get 80 mph winds regularly and my pipes are fine.
Thanks for info! I too get regular high winds with my setup. Not 80mph though, typically around gusts of 50mph. I’ve never had issues either.