OAK-before/after

Fisherman85

New Member
Oct 11, 2018
18
Indiana
I apologize because I realize the topic of OAKs has been debated for a long time. I was just curious if anyone has had a unit that they have operated without an OAK that they later converted to an OAK. I am debating on adding one to mine and am curious of the before and after results others have had? Do they make much of a difference in lost heat?
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,558
central pa
I have done it with the princess I am running and saw no difference. But I have added them to some customers stoves and it made a huge difference.
 

showrguy

Feeling the Heat
Aug 2, 2015
451
Marysville, Pa.
I ran my King for 1 1/2 seasons without, stove burnt great..
Added the OAK after realizing how many areas I had pulling cold air from outside,,,,, BIG DIFFERENCE... in my situation anyway !!
 

Ludlow

Minister of Fire
Jun 4, 2018
1,423
PA
Unless you are in a manufactured home or super tight new construction, adding an OAK probably wont make a difference in stove function. The benefit will be that far rooms will be less drafty/more comfortable. If it is easy to add one in your setup it's a no brainer.
 
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Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
12,160
Southern IN
I ran my King for 1 1/2 seasons without, stove burnt great..
Added the OAK after realizing how many areas I had pulling cold air from outside,,,,, BIG DIFFERENCE... in my situation anyway !!
Did you have a way to quantify that? I'd think maybe that it would be noticeable if one burns the stove with the air open quite a bit. Maybe you do that. Otherwise, burning on low like I do, I wouldn't think the stove is pulling in much additional air, especially in my leaky house. ;lol
I forget the exact numbers, but I thought I read somewhere that the average house turns the air completely over every few hours.
 

Das Jugghead

New Member
Jan 2, 2019
81
Indiana
I installed an outside air kit after burning for a season without one. In my case it substantially reduced the cold air sliding across the floors from the leaky windows toward the stove. It also helped with the overall comfort level of the house by reducing the amount of cold air infiltrating the heated envelope.

As far as stove performance it helped a little by slowing down the burn rate. I have a tall flue above the stove of approximately 28' of insulated stainless steel liner that drafts vigorously.
 

Kevin Weis

Minister of Fire
Mar 3, 2018
932
Union Bridge, Md
I installed an outside air kit after burning for a season without one. In my case it substantially reduced the cold air sliding across the floors from the leaky windows toward the stove. It also helped with the overall comfort level of the house by reducing the amount of cold air infiltrating the heated envelope.

As far as stove performance it helped a little by slowing down the burn rate. I have a tall flue above the stove of approximately 28' of insulated stainless steel liner that drafts vigorously.
Same exactly for me. House is an 1886 balloon frame construction. Made a big difference in the draftyness through the house.
 
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Gearhead660

Feeling the Heat
Dec 20, 2018
338
Southern WI
Did you have a way to quantify that? I'd think maybe that it would be noticeable if one burns the stove with the air open quite a bit. Maybe you do that. Otherwise, burning on low like I do, I wouldn't think the stove is pulling in much additional air, especially in my leaky house. ;lol
I forget the exact numbers, but I thought I read somewhere that the average house turns the air completely over every few hours.
I don't recall the air exchange being every few hours, but I think it was 6 or so times a day. With how air tight we are making new houses these days, the air isn't getting exchanged enough and indoor air quality is suffering. I have an old farm house with no issues with exchanging air, and when I install my new stove this spring, I will be adding and oak to it.
 

showrguy

Feeling the Heat
Aug 2, 2015
451
Marysville, Pa.
Did you have a way to quantify that? I'd think maybe that it would be noticeable if one burns the stove with the air open quite a bit. Maybe you do that. Otherwise, burning on low like I do, I wouldn't think the stove is pulling in much additional air, especially in my leaky house. ;lol
I forget the exact numbers, but I thought I read somewhere that the average house turns the air completely over every few hours.
A scientific study ? No...
Can I tell my office 10 ft. from the stove is now within a few degrees of the great room, instead of 10-12 deg. cooler ? Yes